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Alectura
The Australian brushturkey
Australian brushturkey
or Australian brush-turkey (Alectura lathami), also frequently called the scrub turkey or bush turkey, is a common, widespread species of mound-building bird from the family Megapodiidae
Megapodiidae
found in eastern Australia from Far North Queensland
Far North Queensland
to Illawarra
Illawarra
in New South Wales. The Australian brushturkey
Australian brushturkey
has also been introduced to Kangaroo Island
Kangaroo Island
in South Australia. It is the largest extant representative of the family Megapodiidae, and is one of three species to inhabit Australia. Despite its name and their superficial similarities, the bird is not closely related to American turkeys, nor to the Australian bustard, which is also known as the bush turkey
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Conservation Status
The conservation status of a group of organisms (for instance, a species) indicates whether the group still exists and how likely the group is to become extinct in the near future
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Insects
See text.SynonymsEctognatha EntomidaInsects or Insecta (from Latin
Latin
insectum) are by far the largest group of hexapod invertebrates within the arthropod phylum. Definitions and circumscriptions vary; usually, insects comprise a class within the Phylum
Phylum
Arthropoda. As used here, the term is synonymous with Ectognatha. Insects have a chitinous exoskeleton, a three-part body (head, thorax and abdomen), three pairs of jointed legs, compound eyes and one pair of antennae
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Statistical Significance
In statistical hypothesis testing,[1][2] a result has statistical significance when it is very unlikely to have occurred given the null hypothesis.[3] More precisely, a study's defined significance level, α, is the probability of the study rejecting the null hypothesis, given that it were true;[4] and the p-value of a result, p, is the probability of obtaining a result at least as extreme, given that the null hypothesis were true
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MHNT
The Muséum de Toulouse, sometimes known as MHNT or Muséum d'Histoire Naturelle de la ville de Toulouse, is a museum of natural history in Toulouse, France. It is located in the Busca-Montplaisir, and houses a collection of more than 2.5 million items.Contents1 History 2 Permanent exhibitions 3 Collections3.1 Prehistory 3.2 Botany 3.3 Entomology3.3.1 Coleoptera 3.3.2 Lepidoptera 3.3.3 Orthoptera3.4 Mineralogy 3.5 Ornithology 3.6 Osteology 3.7 Paleontology3.7.1 Invertebrates 3.7.2 Vertebrates4 Henri Gaussen
Henri Gaussen
Botanical Garden 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (November 2011)The museum was founded in 1796 by the naturalist Philippe-Isidore Picot de Lapeyrouse. It was at that time housed in the old buildings of the monastery of the carmelite friars. It was opened to the public in 1865 in its present location and under the directorship of Édouard Filhol
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Goanna
See text.A goanna is any of several Australian monitor lizards of the genus Varanus, as well as certain species from Southeast Asia. Around 30 species of goanna are known, 25 of which are found in Australia. This varied group of carnivorous reptiles ranges greatly in size and fills several ecological niches.[1] The goanna features prominently in Aboriginal mythology and Australian folklore. Being predatory lizards, goannas are often quite large, or at least bulky, with sharp teeth and claws. The largest is the perentie (V. giganteus), which can grow over 2.5 m (8.2 ft) in length.A goanna in Toowoomba, Darling Downs, QueenslandNot all goannas are gargantuan. Pygmy goannas may be smaller than a man's arm. The smallest of these, the short-tailed monitor (Varanus brevicuda) reaches only 20 cm (8 inches) in length. They survive on smaller prey, such as insects and mice. Goannas combine predatory and scavenging behaviours
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Dingo
Canis
Canis
dingo (Meyer, 1793)[6][7][8] Dingo
Dingo
showing its usual "white socked" feet and scarringThe dingo ( Canis
Canis
lupus dingo[4] or Canis
Canis
dingo[9]) is a type of feral dog[1][10] native to Australia.[9][10] The first British colonists to arrive in 1788 established a settlement at Port Jackson
Port Jackson
and recorded dingoes living there with indigenous Australians.[11] Although the dingo exists in the wild,[12] it associates with humans but has not been selectively bred similarly to other domesticated animals.[2][12] It is a medium-sized canid that possesses a lean, hardy body designed for speed, agility and stamina
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Aboriginal Australians
Aboriginal Australians
Australians
are legally defined as people who are members "of the Aboriginal race of Australia" (indigenous to mainland Australia or to the island of Tasmania).[3][4][5][6]Contents1 Legal and administrative definitions1.1 Definitions from Aboriginal Australians 1.2 Definitions from academia2 Origins 3 Health3.1 Tobacco
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Mulch
A mulch is a layer of material applied to the surface of soil. Reasons for applying mulch include conservation of soil moisture, improving fertility and health of the soil, reducing weed growth and enhancing the visual appeal of the area. A mulch is usually, but not exclusively, organic in nature. It may be permanent (e.g. plastic sheeting) or temporary (e.g. bark chips). It may be applied to bare soil or around existing plants. Mulches of manure or compost will be incorporated naturally into the soil by the activity of worms and other organisms
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Rainforest
Rainforests are forests characterized by high rainfall, with annual rainfall in the case of tropical rainforests between 250 and 450 centimetres (98 and 177 in),[1] and definitions varying by region for temperate rainforests
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Sclerophyll
Sclerophyll
Sclerophyll
is a type of vegetation that has hard leaves, short internodes (the distance between leaves along the stem) and leaf orientation parallel or oblique to direct sunlight. The word comes from the Greek sklēros (hard) and phyllon (leaf). Sclerophyllous plants occur in many parts of the world,[1] but are most typical in the chaparral biomes. They are prominent throughout western ( Perth
Perth
region), eastern ( Sydney
Sydney
region) and southern (Adelaide region) parts of Australia,[2] in the Mediterranean forests, woodlands, and scrub biomes that cover the Mediterranean Basin, Californian chaparral and woodlands, Chilean Matorral, and the Cape Province of South Africa. The sclerophyll leaves have three leaf stress traits used to cope with hot and dry summer. 1. The leaves are hard due to lignin, which prevents wilting and allows plants to grow 2
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Brisbane
Brisbane
Brisbane
(/ˈbrɪzbən/ ( listen))[8] is the capital of and most populous city in the Australian state of Queensland,[9] and the third most populous city in Australia
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Sydney
Sydney
Sydney
(/ˈsɪdni/ ( listen))[7] is the state capital of New South Wales
Wales
and the most populous city in Australia
Australia
and Oceania.[8] Located on Australia's east coast, the metropolis surrounds the world's largest natural harbour and sprawls about 70 km (43.5 mi) on its periphery towards the Blue Mountains to the west, Hawkesbury to the north and Macarthur to the south.[9] Sydney
Sydney
is made up of 658 suburbs, 40 local government areas and 15 contiguous regions
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Cooktown
Cooktown is a town and locality in the Shire of Cook, Queensland, Australia.[2][3] Cooktown is located about 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) north of Brisbane
Brisbane
and 328 kilometres (204 mi) north of Cairns, by road. At the time of the 2016 census, Cooktown had a population of 2,631.[4] Cooktown is at the mouth of the Endeavour River, on Cape York Peninsula in Far North Queensland
Queensland
where James Cook
James Cook
beached his ship, the Endeavour, for repairs in 1770
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Nesting Season
The nesting season is the time of year during which birds and some other animals, particularly some reptiles, build nests, lay eggs in them, and in most cases bring up their young. It is usually in the spring. Bird
Bird
conservation often advises measures to avoid disturbing birds in their nesting season.This bird-related article is a stub
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Department Of Environment, Climate Change And Water (New South Wales)
The New South Wales
New South Wales
Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH), a division of the Government of New South Wales, is responsible for the care and protection of the environment and heritage, which includes the natural environment, Aboriginal country, culture and heritage, and built heritage in New South Wales, Australia. The OEH supports the community, business and government in protecting, strengthening and making the most of a healthy environment and economy within the state. The OEH is part of the Department of Planning and Environment cluster and also manages national parks and reserves.[1] The Chief Executive of the Office of Environment and Heritage is Antony Lean; who reports to the Minister for the Environment and Minister for Heritage, the Hon
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