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Albert Riemenschneider
(Charles) Albert Riemenschneider (August 31, 1878 – July 20, 1950) was an American musician and Bach musicologist. Riemenschneider was born into a musical family. His father, Karl H. Riemenschneider,[N 1] was the president of German Wallace College in Berea, Ohio (which later became Baldwin-Wallace (BW) College)
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Grove Dictionary Of Music And Musicians
The New Grove Dictionary of Music
Music
and Musicians is an encyclopedic dictionary of music and musicians. Along with the German-language Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart, it is one of the largest reference works on western music. Originally published under the title A Dictionary of Music
Music
and Musicians, and later as Grove's Dictionary of Music
Music
and Musicians, it has gone through several editions since the 19th century and is widely used
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Doctor Of Music
The Doctor of Music
Doctor of Music
degree (D.Mus., D.M., Mus.D. or occasionally Mus.Doc.) is a higher doctorate awarded on the basis of a substantial portfolio of compositions and/or scholarly publications on music. Like other higher doctorates, it is granted by universities in the United Kingdom, Ireland
Ireland
and some Commonwealth
Commonwealth
countries. Most universities restrict candidature to their own graduates or staff, which is a reversal of the practice in former times, when (unlike higher degrees in other faculties) candidates for the degree were not required to be a Master of Arts. The Doctor of Music
Doctor of Music
degree should not be confused with the Doctor of Musical Arts (D.M.A.) degree, which is the standard (Ph.D.-level) doctorate in fields such as performance (including conducting) and musical composition
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List Of Chamber Music Works By Johann Sebastian Bach
Sebastian
Sebastian
may refer to:Contents1 People1.1 Musicians2 Music 3 Characters 4 Places 5 Films 6 Literature 7 See alsoPeople[edit] Sebastian
Sebastian
(name), including a list of persons with the name Sebastián (sculptor)
Sebastián (sculptor)
(born 1947), artist based in Mexico Sebastian I of Portugal
Sebastian I of Portugal
(1554–1578), King of Portugal Mr
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List Of Keyboard And Lute Compositions By Johann Sebastian Bach
Composition or Compositions may refer to:Contents1 Arts 2 Computer science 3 Mathematics 4 History 5 Other 6 See alsoArts[edit] Composition doll, a doll made of a wood based composite material Composition roller, cast from a hide glue and molasses used in brayers and inking rollers for letterpress and other relief printing
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Musicology
Musicology
Musicology
(from Greek μουσική (mousikē), meaning 'music', and -λογία (-logia), meaning 'study of') is the scholarly analysis and research-based study of music. Musicology
Musicology
is part of the humanities. A scholar who participates in musical research is a musicologist.[1][2][3] Traditionally, historical musicology (commonly termed "music history") has been the most prominent sub-discipline of musicology. In the 2010s, historical musicology is one of several large musicology sub-disciplines. Historical musicology, ethnomusicology, and systematic musicology are approximately equal in size.[4] Ethnomusicology
Ethnomusicology
is the study of music in its cultural context. Systematic musicology includes music acoustics, the science and technology of acoustical musical instruments, and the musical implications of physiology, psychology, sociology, philosophy and computing
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Akron, Ohio
Akron (/ˈækrən/) is the fifth-largest city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Ohio
Ohio
and is the county seat of Summit County. It is located on the western edge of the Glaciated Allegheny Plateau, approximately 39 miles (63 km) south of Lake Erie. As of the 2015 Census
Census
Estimate, the city proper had a total population of 197,542, making it the 119th largest city in the United States. The Akron, OH Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) covers Summit and Portage counties, and in 2010 had a population of 703,200.[5] It is also part of the larger Cleveland-Akron-Canton, OH Combined Statistical Area, which in 2013 had a population of 3,501,538, ranking 15th. Co-founded along the Little Cuyahoga River
Cuyahoga River
in 1825 by Simon Perkins and Paul Williams, it was chosen as a strategic point at the summit of the developing Ohio
Ohio
and Erie Canal
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List Of Students Of Johann Sebastian Bach
This is a list of students of music, organized by teacher. A[edit]ContentsA B C to F G to J K to M N to Q R to S T to ZSee also ReferencesArkady Abaza[edit]this teacher's teachers Abaza (1843–1915) studied with teachers including Alexander Dreyschock and Camille Everardi.Nikolai Roslavets[1]Christian Ferdinand Abel[edit]Carl Friedrich Abel[2]Hermann Abendroth[edit]this teacher's teachers Abendroth (1883–1956) studied with teachers including Ludwig Thuille.Allard de Ridder [pupils][3] Herbert Eimert [pupils] Günther Herbig[4] Wilhelm Schüchter[5] William Steinberg[6]Dieter Acker[edit]Susanne Erding-Swiridoff[7]Adolphe Adam[edit]this teacher's teachers Adam (1803–1856) studied with teachers including Charles-Simon Catel, François Benoist, and François-Adrien Boieldieu.Léo Delibes [pupils][8][9] Ferdinand Poise[10] Loïsa Puget[11][12]L
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G. Schirmer
G. Schirmer, Inc.
G. Schirmer, Inc.
is an American classical music publishing company based in New York City, founded in 1861. It publishes sheet music for sale and rental, and represents some well-known European music publishers in North America, such as the Music Sales
Music Sales
Affiliates ChesterNovello, Breitkopf & Härtel, Sikorski and many Russian and former Soviet composers' catalogs.[1]Contents1 History 2 Composers published by the company 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The company was founded in 1861 in the United States by German-born Gustav Schirmer, Sr. (1829–1893), the son of a German immigrant.[2] In 1891, the company established its own engraving and printing plant. The next year it inaugurated the Schirmer's Library of Musical Classics
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Figured Bass
Figured bass, or thoroughbass, is a kind of musical notation in which numerals and symbols (often accidentals) indicate intervals, chords, and non-chord tones that a musician playing piano, harpsichord, organ, lute (or other instruments capable of playing chords) play in relation to the bass note that these numbers and symbols appear above or below. Figured bass
Figured bass
is closely associated with basso continuo, a historically improvised accompaniment used in almost all genres of music in the Baroque period of
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Chorale
Chorale
Chorale
is the name of several related musical forms originating in the music genre of the Lutheran chorale: Hymn tune
Hymn tune
of a Lutheran hymn
Lutheran hymn
(e.g. the melody of "Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme"), or a tune in a similar format (e.g. one of the themes in the Finale of Saint-Saëns's Third Symphony) Such tune with a harmonic accompaniment (e.g. chorale monody, chorales included in Schemellis Gesangbuch) Such a tune presented in a homophonic or homorhythmic harmonisation, usually four-part harmony (e.g. Bach's four-part chorales, or the chorale included in the second movement of Mahler's Fifth Symphony) A more complex setting of a hymn(-like) tune (e.g
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Library Of Congress
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
(LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States
United States
Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States. It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States. The Library is housed in three buildings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.; it also maintains the Packard Campus in Culpeper, Virginia, which houses the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center.[3] The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
claims to be the largest library in the world.[4][5] Its "collections are universal, not limited by subject, format, or national boundary, and include research materials from all parts of the world and in more than 450 languages
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Methodism
Methodism
Methodism
or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant
Protestant
Christianity
Christianity
which derive their inspiration from the life and teachings of John Wesley, an Anglican minister in England. George Whitefield
George Whitefield
and John Wesley's brother Charles Wesley
Charles Wesley
were also significant early leaders in the movement. It originated as a revival within the 18th century Church of England
Church of England
and became a separate denomination after Wesley's death. The movement spread throughout the British Empire, the United States, and beyond because of vigorous missionary work,[1] today claiming approximately 80 million adherents worldwide.[2][nb 1] Wesley's theology focused on sanctification and the effect of faith on the character of a Christian
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Harmony
In music, harmony considers the process by which the composition of individual sounds, or superpositions of sounds, is analysed by hearing. Usually, this means simultaneously occurring frequencies, pitches (tones, notes), or chords.[1] The study of harmony involves chords and their construction and chord progressions and the principles of connection that govern them.[2] Harmony
Harmony
is often said to refer to the "vertical" aspect of music, as distinguished from melodic line, or the "horizontal" aspect.[3] Counterpoint, which refers to the relationship between melodic lines, and polyphony, which refers to the simultaneous sounding of separate independent voices, are thus sometimes distinguished from harmony. In popular and jazz harmony, chords are named by their root plus various terms and characters indicating their qualities. In many types of music, notably baroque, romantic, modern, and jazz, chords are often augmented with "tensions"
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Honorary Degree
An honorary degree,[1] in Latin
Latin
a degree honoris causa ("for the sake of the honor") or ad honorem ("to the honor"), is an academic degree for which a university (or other degree-awarding institution) has waived the usual requirements, such as matriculation, residence, a dissertation and the passing of comprehensive examinations. The degree is typically a doctorate or, less commonly, a master's degree, and may be awarded to someone who has no prior connection with the academic institution[2] or no previous postsecondary education. An example of identifying a recipient of this award is as follows: Doctorate
Doctorate
in Business Administration (Hon
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