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Albany Ward
Hannam Edward Albany Ward (6 November 1879 – 18 February 1966), known as Albany Ward, was a pioneer English theatre proprietor and cinema developer, who ran one of the largest cinema circuits in Britain in the early part of the twentieth century. He was born Hannam Edward Bonnor in Stoke Newington, London, the youngest son of William Bonnor, a surgeon originally from Hereford, and his wife Emma. He was educated at Christ's Hospital.[1] After leaving school he joined his widowed mother in Ilfracombe, Devon, before starting work in 1896 as an assistant to pioneer filmmaker Birt Acres in High Barnet.[1] He then joined the Velograph Company, managed by Adolphe Langfier, as a projectionist, and began touring the country with films of such events as Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee.[2] In 1898 he formed his own company and toured Wales and the south-west of England, becoming the first moving picture exhibitor in parts of the country
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Sound Effect
Sound
Sound
effects (or audio effects) are artificially created or enhanced sounds, or sound processes used to emphasize artistic or other content of films, television shows, live performance, animation, video games, music, or other media. In motion picture and television production, a sound effect is a sound recorded and presented to make a specific storytelling or creative point without the use of dialogue or music. The term often refers to a process applied to a recording, without necessarily referring to the recording itself. In professional motion picture and television production, dialogue, music, and sound effects recordings are treated as separate elements
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Moving Picture
A film, also called a movie, motion picture, theatrical film, or photoplay, is a series of still images that, when shown on a screen, create the illusion of moving images. (See the glossary of motion picture terms.) This optical illusion causes the audience to perceive continuous motion between separate objects viewed in rapid succession. The process of filmmaking is both an art and an industry
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Chepstow
Chepstow
Chepstow
(Welsh: Cas-gwent) is a town in Monmouthshire, Wales, adjoining the border with Gloucestershire, England. It is located on the River Wye, about 2 miles (3.2 km) above its confluence with the River Severn, and adjoining the western end of the Severn Bridge. It is 16 miles (26 km) east of Newport, 28 miles (45 km) east-northeast of Cardiff, 18 miles (29 km) northwest of Bristol and 110 miles (180 km) west of London. Chepstow
Chepstow
Castle, situated on a clifftop above the Wye and its bridge, is often cited as the oldest surviving stone castle in Britain. The castle was established by William FitzOsbern immediately after the Norman conquest, and was extended in later centuries before becoming ruined after the Civil War. A Benedictine
Benedictine
priory was also established within the walled town, which was the centre of the Marcher lordship of Striguil
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Exeter
Exeter
Exeter
(/ˈɛksɪtər/ ( listen)) is a cathedral city in Devon, England, with a population of 129,800 (mid-2016 est.). The city is on the River Exe
River Exe
about 37 miles (60 km) northeast of Plymouth
Plymouth
and 70 miles (110 km) southwest of Bristol. It is the county town of Devon, and the home of Devon
Devon
County Council. Exeter
Exeter
was the most south-westerly Roman fortified settlement in Britain, although there is evidence a British tribe existed in Exeter before the Roman invasion. Exeter
Exeter
became a religious centre during the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and into the Tudor times: Exeter
Exeter
Cathedral, founded in the mid 11th century, became Anglican
Anglican
during the 16th-century English Reformation
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Weymouth, Dorset
Weymouth /ˈweɪməθ/ is a seaside town in Dorset, England, situated on a sheltered bay at the mouth of the River Wey on the English Channel coast. The town is 11 kilometres (7 mi) south of Dorchester and 8 kilometres (5 mi) north of the Isle of Portland. The town's population is 52,323 (2011). Weymouth has a metropolitan population of 71,083 (2016) [2]. The town is the third largest settlement in Dorset
Dorset
after the unitary authorities of Bournemouth
Bournemouth
and Poole.[3] Weymouth is a tourist resort, and its economy depends on its harbour and visitor attractions; the town is a gateway situated halfway along the Jurassic Coast, a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
on the Dorset
Dorset
and east Devon coast, important for its geology and landforms
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Variety Act
Variety shows, also known as variety arts or variety entertainment, is entertainment made up of a variety of acts including musical performances, sketch comedy, magic, acrobatics, juggling, and ventriloquism. It is normally introduced by a compère (master of ceremonies) or host. The variety format made its way from Victorian era stage to radio and then television. Variety shows were a staple of anglophone television from the late 1940s into the 1980s. While still widespread in some parts of the world, the proliferation of multichannel television and evolving viewer tastes affected the popularity of variety shows in the United States
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Oxford
Oxford
Oxford
(/ˈɒksfərd/)[3][4] is a city in the South East region of England
England
and the county town of Oxfordshire. With an estimated 2016 population of 170,350, it is the 52nd largest city in the United Kingdom,[5][6] and one of the fastest growing and most ethnically diverse.[7][8] The city is situated 57 miles (92 km) from London, 69 miles (111 km) from Bristol, 65 miles (105 km) from both Southampton
Southampton
and Birmingham
Birmingham
and 25 miles (40 km) from Reading. The city is known worldwide as the home of the University of Oxford, the oldest university in the English-speaking world.[9] Buildings in Oxford
Oxford
demonstrate notable examples of every English architectural period since the late Saxon period. Oxford
Oxford
is known as the "city of dreaming spires", a term coined by poet Matthew Arnold
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Stoke Newington
Stoke Newington
Stoke Newington
is an area occupying the north-west part of the London Borough of Hackney in north-east London. It is 5 miles north-east of Charing Cross
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Diamond Jubilee
A diamond jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 60th anniversary of an event related to a person (e.g. accession to the throne, wedding, etc.). In the case of an event not relating to a person (e.g. the founding of an organization), a diamond jubilee is observed at the 75th anniversary.[1][not in citation given]Contents1 Western monarchies 2 Asian monarchies 3 African monarchies 4 List of diamond jubilees 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksWestern monarchies[edit]The Tolsey clock commemorates the Diamond
Diamond
Jubilee (60 years) of Queen Victoria's reign. The clock says "1837 – 1897"
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Torquay
Torquay
Torquay
(/tɔːrˈkiː/ tor-KEE) is a seaside town in Devon, England, part of the unitary authority area of Torbay. It lies 18 miles (29 km) south of the county town of Exeter
Exeter
and 28 miles (45 km) east-north-east of Plymouth, on the north of Tor Bay, adjoining the neighbouring town of Paignton
Paignton
on the west of the bay and across from the fishing port of Brixham. The town's economy, like Brixham's, was initially based upon fishing and agriculture, but in the early 19th century it began to develop into a fashionable seaside resort, initially frequented by members of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
during the Napoleonic Wars
Napoleonic Wars
while the Royal Navy anchored in the bay. Later, as the town's fame spread, it was popular with Victorian society
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Queen Victoria
Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom
Queen of the United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death. On 1 May 1876, she adopted the additional title of Empress of India. Victoria was the daughter of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, the fourth son of King George III. Both the Duke of Kent and King George III
King George III
died in 1820, and Victoria was raised under close supervision by her German-born mother, Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. She inherited the throne at the age of 18, after her father's three elder brothers had all died, leaving no surviving legitimate children. The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
was already an established constitutional monarchy, in which the sovereign held relatively little direct political power
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Projectionist
A projectionist is a person who operates a movie projector. In the strict sense of the term this means any film projector and therefore could include someone who operates the projector in a show. In common usage the term is generally understood to describe a paid employee of a movie theater. They are also known as "operators".[1][2]Contents1 Historical background1.1 Early cinema (1895–1915) 1.2 Classical period (1915–1953) 1.3 Post-Classical period (1953–early 1980s) 1.4 Final film period (early 1980s–present) 1.5 Future2 Elements of the job2.1 Film presentation 2.2 Maintenance and repair3 References 4 Bibliography 5 External linksHistorical background[edit] N.B
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High Barnet
Chipping Barnet
Chipping Barnet
or High Barnet is a market town in the London Borough of Barnet, England. It is a suburban development built around a 12th-century settlement, and is located 10 1⁄2 miles (17 km) north north-west of Charing Cross, east from Borehamwood, west from Enfield and south from Potters Bar. Its name is very often abbreviated to just Barnet, which is also the name of the borough of which it forms a part. Chipping Barnet
Chipping Barnet
is also the name of the Parliamentary constituency covering the local area - the word "Chipping" denotes the presence of a market, one that was established here at the end of the 12th century and persists to this day
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