HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Alaska Peninsula
The Alaska
Alaska
Peninsula
Peninsula
is a peninsula extending about 800 km (497 mi) to the southwest from the mainland of Alaska
Alaska
and ending in the Aleutian Islands. The peninsula separates the Pacific
Pacific
Ocean from Bristol Bay, an arm of the Bering Sea. In literature (especially Russian) the term ‘ Alaska
Alaska
Peninsula’ was used to denote the entire northwestern protrusion of the North American continent, or all of what is now the state of Alaska, exclusive of its panhandle and islands
[...More...]

"Alaska Peninsula" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Volcano
A volcano is a rupture in the crust of a planetary-mass object, such as Earth, that allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because its crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in its mantle.[1] Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging, and most are found underwater. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates whereas the Pacific Ring of Fire
Pacific Ring of Fire
has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates
[...More...]

"Volcano" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Seismic
Seismology
Seismology
( /saɪzˈmɒlədʒi/; from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
σεισμός (seismós) meaning "earthquake" and -λογία (-logía) meaning "study of") is the scientific study of earthquakes and the propagation of elastic waves through the Earth
Earth
or through other planet-like bodies. The field also includes studies of earthquake environmental effects such as tsunamis as well as diverse seismic sources such as volcanic, tectonic, oceanic, atmospheric, and artificial processes such as explosions. A related field that uses geology to infer information regarding past earthquakes is paleoseismology. A recording of earth motion as a function of time is called a seismogram
[...More...]

"Seismic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Erosion
In earth science, erosion is the action of surface processes (such as water flow or wind) that removes soil, rock, or dissolved material from one location on the Earth's crust, and then transport it away to another location[1] (not to be confused with weathering which involves no movement). This natural process is caused by the dynamic activity of erosive agents, that is, water, ice (glaciers), snow, air (wind), plants, animals, and humans. In accordance with these agents, erosion is sometimes divided into water erosion, glacial erosion, snow erosion, wind (aeolic) erosion, zoogenic erosion, and anthropogenic erosion[2].The particulate breakdown of rock or soil into clastic sediment is referred to as physical or mechanical erosion; this contrasts with chemical erosion, where soil or rock material is removed from an area by its dissolving into a solvent (typically water), followed by the flow away of that solution
[...More...]

"Erosion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

North American Plate
The North American Plate
North American Plate
is a tectonic plate covering most of North America, Greenland, Cuba, the Bahamas, extreme northeastern Asia, and parts of Iceland
Iceland
and the Azores. It extends eastward to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge
Mid-Atlantic Ridge
and westward to the Chersky Range
Chersky Range
in eastern Siberia. The plate includes both continental and oceanic crust. The interior of the main continental landmass includes an extensive granitic core called a craton. Along most of the edges of this craton are fragments of crustal material called terranes, accreted to the craton by tectonic actions over a long span of time
[...More...]

"North American Plate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pacific Plate
The Pacific Plate
Pacific Plate
is an oceanic tectonic plate that lies beneath the Pacific Ocean. At 103 million square kilometres (40,000,000 sq mi), it is the largest tectonic plate.[2] The Pacific Plate
Pacific Plate
contains an interior hot spot forming the Hawaiian Islands.[3] Hillis and Müller are reported to consider the Bird's Head Plate
Bird's Head Plate
to be moving in unison with the Pacific Plate.[4] Bird considers them to be unconnected.[5]Contents1 Boundaries 2 Paleo-geology of the Pacific Plate 3 References 4 External linksBoundaries[edit] The north-eastern side is a divergent boundary with the Explorer Plate, the Juan de Fuca Plate
Juan de Fuca Plate
and the Gorda Plate
Gorda Plate
forming respectively the Explorer Ridge, the Juan de Fuca Ridge
Juan de Fuca Ridge
and the Gorda Ridge
[...More...]

"Pacific Plate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Caribou
Cervus
Cervus
tarandus (Linnaeus, 1758)The reindeer (Rangifer tarandus), also known as the caribou in North America,[3] is a species of deer with circumpolar distribution, native to Arctic, sub-Arctic, tundra, boreal and mountainous regions of northern Europe, Siberia
Siberia
and North America.[2] This includes both sedentary and migratory populations. Rangifer herd size varies greatly in different geographic regions. The Taimyr herd of migrating Siberian tundra reindeer (R. t. sibiricus) in Russia
Russia
is the largest wild reindeer herd in the world,[4][5] with numbers varying between 400,000 and 1,000,000. What was once the second largest herd is the migratory boreal woodland caribou (R. t. caribou) George River herd in Canada, with former variations between 28,000 and 385,000
[...More...]

"Caribou" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Moose
The moose (North America) or elk (Eurasia), Alces alces, is the largest extant species in the deer family. Moose
Moose
are distinguished by the broad, flat (or palmate) antlers of the males; other members of the family have antlers with a dendritic ("twig-like") configuration. Moose
Moose
typically inhabit boreal forests and temperate broadleaf and mixed forests of the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
in temperate to subarctic climates. Hunting
Hunting
and other human activities have caused a reduction in the size of the moose's range over time. Moose
Moose
have been reintroduced to some of their former habitats. Currently, most moose are found in Canada, Alaska, New England, Fennoscandia, Baltic states, and Russia. Their diet consists of both terrestrial and aquatic vegetation. The most common moose predators are the gray wolf along with bears and humans
[...More...]

"Moose" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gray Wolf
refer Subspecies
Subspecies
of Canis
Canis
lupusHistorical (red + green) and modern (green) range of wild subspecies of C. lupusThe gray wolf ( Canis
Canis
lupus),[a] also known as the timber wolf[3][4] or western wolf,[b] is a canine native to the wilderness and remote areas of Eurasia
Eurasia
and North America
[...More...]

"Gray Wolf" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sockeye Salmon
Sockeye salmon
Sockeye salmon
( Oncorhynchus
Oncorhynchus
nerka), also called red salmon, kokanee salmon, or blueback salmon, is an anadromous species of salmon found in the Northern Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
and rivers discharging into it. This species is a Pacific salmon
Pacific salmon
that is primarily red in hue during spawning. They can grow up to 84 cm (2 ft 9 in) in length and weigh 2.3 to 7 kg (5.1–15.4 lb). Juveniles remain in freshwater until they are ready to migrate to the ocean, over distances of up to 1,600 km (990 mi). Their diet consists primarily of zooplankton. Sockeye salmon
Sockeye salmon
are semelparous, dying after they spawn
[...More...]

"Sockeye Salmon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mountain Range
A mountain range or hill range is a series of mountains or hills ranged in a line and connected by high ground. A mountain system or mountain belt is a group of mountain ranges with similarity in form, structure and alignment that have arisen from the same cause, usually an orogeny.[1] Mountain
Mountain
ranges are formed by a variety of geological processes, but most of the significant ones on Earth
Earth
are the result of plate tectonics. Mountain
Mountain
ranges are also found on many planetary mass objects in the Solar System
Solar System
and are likely a feature of most terrestrial planets. Mountain
Mountain
ranges are usually segmented by highlands or mountain passes and valleys. Individual mountains within the same mountain range do not necessarily have the same geologic structure or petrology
[...More...]

"Mountain Range" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kodiak Archipelago
The Kodiak Archipelago
Archipelago
is an archipelago, or group of islands, south of the main land mass of the state of Alaska (United States), about 405 km (252 mi) by air south of Anchorage in the Gulf of Alaska. The largest island in the archipelago is Kodiak Island, the second largest island in the United States. The archipelago is about 285 km (177 mi) long and 108 km (67 mi) across, from the Barren Islands on the north to Chirikof Island
Island
and the Semidi Islands group on the south. The Archipelago
Archipelago
contains 13,890 km2 (5,360 sq mi) of land. The Kodiak Archipelago
Archipelago
contains about 40 small glaciers, numerous streams and many species of land and marine animals
[...More...]

"Kodiak Archipelago" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

County (United States)
In the United States, an administrative or political subdivision of a state is a county, which is a region having specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority.[1] The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana
Louisiana
and Alaska
Alaska
have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs respectively.[1] Most counties have subdivisions which may include municipalities and unincorporated areas. Others have no further divisions, or may serve as a consolidated city-county. Some municipalities are in multiple counties; New York City
New York City
is uniquely partitioned into multiple counties, referred to at the city government level as boroughs. The U.S. federal government
U.S. federal government
uses the term "county equivalent" to describe non-county administrative or statistical areas that are comparable to counties
[...More...]

"County (United States)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ecoregion
An ecoregion (ecological region) is an ecologically and geographically defined area that is smaller than a bioregion, which in turn is smaller than an ecozone. All three of these are either less or greater than an ecosystem.[citation needed][clarification needed] Ecoregions cover relatively large areas of land or water, and contain characteristic, geographically distinct assemblages of natural communities and species. The biodiversity of flora, fauna and ecosystems that characterise an ecoregion tends to be distinct from that of other ecoregions. In theory, biodiversity or conservation ecoregions are relatively large areas of land or water where the probability of encountering different species and communities at any given point remains relatively constant, within an acceptable range of variation (largely undefined at this point). Three caveats are appropriate for all bio-geographic mapping approaches. Firstly, no single bio-geographic framework is optimal for all taxa
[...More...]

"Ecoregion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chignik, Alaska
Chignik (Alutiiq: Cirniq) is a city in Lake and Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. It is two hundred and fifty miles southwest of Kodiak. At the 2010 census the population was 91, up from 79 in 2000.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Notable people 5 Climate 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] On April 17, 1911, a gale blew ashore numerous ships such as the Benjamin F
[...More...]

"Chignik, Alaska" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.