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Alasdair MacIntyre
Catholicism portal Philosophy portalv t eAlasdair Chalmers MacIntyre (/ˈæləstər ˈmækɪnˌtaɪər/; born 12 January 1929) is a Scottish philosopher, primarily known for his contribution to moral and political philosophy, but also known for his work in history of philosophy and theology.[1] MacIntyre's After Virtue
Virtue
(1981) is widely recognised as one of the most important works of Anglophone moral and political philosophy in the 20th century.[2] He is Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Contemporary Aristotelian Studies in
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Glasgow
Glasgow
Glasgow
(/ˈɡlɑːzɡoʊ, ˈɡlɑːs-, ˈɡlæz-, ˈɡlæs-/;[6][7] Scots: Glesga /ˈɡlezɡə/; Scottish Gaelic: Glaschu [ˈkl̪ˠas̪əxu]) is the largest city in Scotland, and third most populous in the United Kingdom. Historically part of Lanarkshire, the city now forms the Glasgow
Glasgow
City council area, one of the 32 council areas of Scotland; the local authority is Glasgow
Glasgow
City Council. Glasgow
Glasgow
is situated on the River Clyde
River Clyde
in the country's West Central Lowlands. Inhabitants of the city are referred to as "Glaswegians" or "Weegies". It is the fourth most visited city in the UK. Glasgow
Glasgow
grew from a small rural settlement on the River Clyde
River Clyde
to become the largest seaport in Britain
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Radical Orthodoxy
Radical orthodoxy is a Christian theological and philosophical school of thought which makes use of postmodern philosophy to reject the paradigm of modernity. The movement was founded by John Milbank and others and takes its name from the title of a collection of essays published by Routledge in 1999: Radical Orthodoxy: A New Theology, edited by Milbank, Catherine Pickstock, and Graham Ward
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Queen Mary, University Of London
Queen Mary University of London
University of London
(QMUL) is a public research university in London, England, and a constituent college of the federal University of London. It dates back to the foundation of London Hospital Medical College in 1785. Queen Mary College, named after Mary of Teck, was admitted to the University of London
University of London
in 1915 and in 1989 merged with Westfield College
Westfield College
to form Queen Mary and Westfield College. In 1995 Queen Mary and Westfield College
Westfield College
merged with St Bartholomew's Hospital Medical College and the London
London
Hospital Medical College to form the School of Medicine and Dentistry. Its main campus is in the Mile End
Mile End
area of Tower Hamlets, with other campuses in Holborn, Smithfield and Whitechapel
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Imre Lakatos
Imre Lakatos
Imre Lakatos
(UK: /ˈlækətɒs/,[4] US: /ˈlækətoʊs/; Hungarian: Lakatos Imre [ˈlɒkɒtoʃ ˈimrɛ]; November 9, 1922 – February 2, 1974) was a Hungarian philosopher of mathematics and science, known for his thesis of the fallibility of mathematics and its 'methodology of proofs and refutations' in its pre-axiomatic stages of development, and also for introducing the concept of the 'research programme' in his methodology of scientific research programmes.Contents1 Life 2 Proofs and refutations, mathematics2.1 Cauchy
Cauchy
and uniform convergence3 Research programmes 4 Pseudoscience4.1 Darwin's theory5 Rational reconstructions of the history of science 6 Criticism6.1 Feyerabend7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External links11.1 ArchivesLife[edit] Lakatos was born Imre (Avrum) Lipschitz to a Jewish family in Debrecen, Hungary in 1922
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Marx
Karl Marx[6] (/mɑːrks/;[7] German: [ˈkaɐ̯l ˈmaɐ̯ks]; 5 May 1818 – 14 March 1883) was a German philosopher, economist, historian, political theorist, sociologist, journalist and revolutionary socialist. Born in Trier
Trier
to a middle-class family, Marx studied law and Hegelian philosophy. Due to his political publications Marx became stateless and lived in exile in London, where he continued to develop his thought in collaboration with German thinker Friedrich Engels
Friedrich Engels
and publish his writings. His best-known titles are the 1848 pamphlet, The Communist
Communist
Manifesto, and the three-volume Das Kapital
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Edward Feser
Edward C. Feser (born April 16, 1968)[1] is an American associate professor of philosophy at Pasadena City College. He has also been a visiting assistant professor of philosophy at Loyola Marymount University and a visiting scholar at the social philosophy and policy center at Bowling Green State University in Ohio.[2] He graduated from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1999 with a PhD in philosophy; his thesis was entitled "Russell, Hayek, and the mind-body problem".[3] By his own account, Feser had been an atheist for ten years during his early adulthood. However, as a graduate student in philosophy, his deep readings of Aristotle and St. Thomas Aquinas led him back to a Christian belief in God and the Catholic Church (he had been baptized and confirmed as a child)
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Contemporary Philosophy
Contemporary philosophy
Contemporary philosophy
is the present period in the history of Western philosophy
Western philosophy
beginning at the end of the 19th century with the professionalization of the discipline and the rise of analytic and continental philosophy. The phrase "contemporary philosophy" is a piece of technical terminology in philosophy that refers to a specific period in the history of Western philosophy
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Victoria University Of Manchester
The former Victoria University of Manchester, now the University of Manchester, was founded in 1851 as Owens College. In 1880, the college joined the federal Victoria University, gaining an independent university charter in 1904 as the Victoria University of Manchester after the collapse of the federal university.[2] On 1 October 2004, the Victoria University of Manchester
Manchester
merged with the University of Manchester
Manchester
Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST) to form a new, larger entity, and the new university was named The University of Manchester.Contents1 History1.1 1851–1951 1.2 1951–20042 Officers 3 Notable people 4 Motto and arms 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksHistory[edit] 1851–1951[edit] The university was founded in 1851 as Owens College, named after John Owens, a textile merchant, who left a bequest of £96,942 for the purpose
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University Of Oxford
Coordinates: 51°45′40″N 1°15′12″W / 51.7611°N 1.2534°W / 51.7611; -1.2534University of OxfordCoat of armsLatin: Universitas OxoniensisMotto Dominus Illuminatio Mea (Latin)Motto in English"The Lord is my Light"Established c. 1096; 922 years ago (1096)[1]Endowment £5.069 billion (inc
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History Of Ethics
Ethics
Ethics
is the branch of philosophy that examines right and wrong moral behavior, moral concepts (such as justice, virtue, duty) and moral language. Various ethical theories pose various answers to the question "What is the greatest good?" and elaborate a complete set of proper behaviors for individuals and groups. Ethical theories are closely related to forms of life in various social orders.[1]Contents1 Origins 2 Jewish ethics 3 Ancient Greek ethics 4 Christian ethics 5 Natural law
Natural law
ethics 6 Kantian ethics 7 Utilitarianism 8 Twentieth century 9 See also 10 Bibliography 11 References 12 External linksOrigins[edit] The epic poems that stand at the beginning of many world literatures, such as the Mesopotamian Epic of Gilgamesh, Homer's Iliad
Iliad
and the Icelandic Eddas, portray a set of values that suit the strong leader of a small tribe
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Civil Society
Civil society
Civil society
is the "aggregate of non-governmental organizations and institutions that manifest interests and will of citizens".[1] Civil society includes the family and the private sphere, referred to as the "third sector" of society, distinct from government and business.[2] By other authors, "civil society" is used in the sense of 1) the aggregate of non-governmental organizations and institutions that manifest interests and will of citizens or 2) individuals and organizations in a society which are independent of the government.[1] Sometimes the term civil society is used in the more general sense of "the elements such as freedom of speech, an independent judiciary, etc, that make up a democratic society" (Collins English Dictionary).[3] Especially in the discussions among thinkers of Eastern and Central Europe, civil society is seen also as a concept of civic values
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Political Particularism
In political science, political particularism is the ability of policymakers to further their careers by catering to narrow interests rather than to broader national platforms.[1] It is often characterized by its opponents as the politics of group identity that trumps universal rights and therefore the rights of minorities or any other kind of "other". In a political system governed by particularism, sooner or later, the decisive factor of politics becomes religious and ethnic identity and the interests of the communities defined by these bonds. This stands in contrast with the ideas and values of political pluralism, with its emphasis on universal rights, separation of religion and the government, and an ethic of religious and ethnic tolerance. References[edit]^ Alejandro Gaviria; Ugo Panizza; Ernesto Stein; Jessica Seddon (March 2000)
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Positive Rights
Negative and positive rights are rights that oblige either action (positive rights) or inaction (negative rights). These obligations may be of either a legal or moral character. The notion of positive and negative rights may also be applied to liberty rights. To take an example involving two parties in a court of law: Adrian has a negative right to x against Clay if and only if Clay is prohibited from acting upon Adrian in some way regarding x. In contrast, Adrian has a positive right to x against Clay if and only if Clay is obliged to act upon Adrian in some way regarding x
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Social Capital
Social capital
Social capital
is a form of economic and cultural capital in which social networks are central; transactions are marked by reciprocity, trust, and cooperation; and market agents produce goods and services not mainly for themselves, but for a common good. The term generally refers to (a) resources, and the value of these resources, both tangible (public spaces, private property) and intangible ("actors", "human capital", people), (b) the relationships among these resources, and (c) the impact that these relationships have on the resources involved in each relationship, and on larger groups
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