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Alarich I
Alaric I
Alaric I
(/ˈælərɪk/; Gothic: *Alareiks, "ruler of all";[2] Latin: Alaricus; 370 (or 375) – 410 AD) was the first King of the Visigoths
Visigoths
from 395–410, son (or paternal grandson) of chieftain Rothestes.[3] Alaric is best known for his sack of Rome
Rome
in 410, which marked a decisive event in the decline of the Roman Empire. Alaric began his career under the Goth soldiers Gainas and later joined the Roman army. Alaric's first appearance was as the leader of a mixed band of Goths
Goths
and allied peoples who invaded Thrace
Thrace
in 391 and were stopped by the half- Vandal
Vandal
Roman General Stilicho. In 394 he led a Gothic force of 20,000 that helped the Eastern Roman Emperor Theodosius defeat the Frankish usurper Arbogast at the Battle of Frigidus
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Visigoths
The Visigoths
Visigoths
(UK: /ˈvɪzɪˌɡɒθs/; US: /ˈvɪzɪˌɡɑːθs/; Latin: Visigothi, Wisigothi, Vesi, Visi, Wesi, Wisi; Italian: Visigoti) were the western branches of the nomadic tribes of Germanic peoples referred to collectively as the Goths.[2] These tribes flourished and spread throughout the late Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in Late Antiquity, or what is known as the Migration Period
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Flavius Arcadius
Arcadius
Arcadius
(Latin: Flavius Arcadius
Arcadius
Augustus; Greek: Ἀρκάδιος; 1 January 377 – 1 May 408) was Eastern Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
from 395 to 408. He was the eldest son of Theodosius I
Theodosius I
and his first wife Aelia Flaccilla, and brother of the Western Emperor Honorius. A weak ruler, his reign was dominated by a series of powerful ministers and by his wife, Aelia Eudoxia.[citation needed]Contents1 History 2 Character and works 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Arcadius
Arcadius
was born in Hispania, the elder son of Theodosius I
Theodosius I
and Aelia Flaccilla, and brother of Honorius, who would become a Western Roman Emperor. His father declared him an Augustus
Augustus
and co-ruler for the Eastern half of the Empire in January 383
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Arbogast (general)
Flavius Arbogastes (died September 8, 394), or Arbogast, was a Frankish general in the Roman Empire. It has been stated by some ancient historians that he was the son of Flavius Bauto, Valentinian II's former magister militum and protector before Arbogast, but modern scholars largely discount this claim.[1]Contents1 Early career1.1 Threat and execution of Maximus2 Arbogast and Valentinian II2.1 Death of Valentinian II2.1.1 Debate about the death of Valentinian II3 Arbogast and Eugenius3.1 The Battle of the Frigidus3.1.1 Deaths of Arbogast and Eugenius3.1.1.1 Symbolism of the Battle of the Frigidus3.2 Closing descriptions of Arbogast4 See also 5 References5.1 Sources 5.2 Further reading6 External linksEarly career[edit] Flavius Arbogastes, or simply Arbogast, was the nephew of the great Frankish General Flavius Richomeres[2] and resided within the Frankish domain as a native of Galatia Minor[3] until he was expelled in the later 370s CE
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Battle Of Frigidus
The Battle of the Frigidus, also called the Battle of the Frigid River, was fought between 5–6 September 394, between the army of the Eastern Emperor Theodosius I
Theodosius I
and the army of Western Roman ruler Eugenius. Because the Western Emperor Eugenius
Eugenius
(though nominally Christian) had pagan sympathies, the war assumed religious overtones, with Christianity pitted against the last attempt at a pagan revival
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Reiks
Reiks (pronunciation /ri:ks/; Latinized as rix) is a Gothic title for a tribal ruler, often translated as "king". In the Gothic Bible, it translates to the Greek árchōn (ἄρχων).[1] It is presumably translated as basiliskos (βασιλίσκος "petty king") in the Passio of Sabbas the Goth.[2] The Gothic Thervingi
Thervingi
were divided into subdivisions of territory and people called *kunja (singular kuni, cognate with English kin), led by a re
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Constantinople
Κωνσταντινούπολις (in Greek) Constantinopolis (in Latin)Map of ConstantinopleShown within Asia
Asia
MinorAlternate name Byzantion (earlier Greek name), Miklagard/Miklagarth (Old Norse), Tsarigrad (Slavic), Basileuousa ("Queen of Cities"), Megalopolis ("the Great City")Location Istanbul, Istanbul
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Greece
Greece
Greece
(Greek: Ελλάδα), officially the Hellenic Republic (Ελληνική Δημοκρατία), historically also known as Hellas, is a country located in Southern Europe,[10] with a population of approximately 11 million as of 2016. Athens
Athens
is the nation's capital and largest city, followed by Thessaloniki. Greece
Greece
is located at the crossroads of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Situated on the southern tip of the Balkan Peninsula, it shares land borders with Albania
Albania
to the northwest, the Republic of Macedonia
Republic of Macedonia
and Bulgaria
Bulgaria
to the north, and Turkey
Turkey
to the northeast
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Piraeus
Piraeus
Piraeus
(/paɪˈriːəs, pɪˈreɪ.əs/; Greek: Πειραιάς Pireás [pireˈas], Ancient Greek: Πειραιεύς, Peiraieús, pronounced [peːrai̯eús]) is a port city in the region of Attica, Greece. Piraeus
Piraeus
is located within the Athens
Athens
urban area,[2] 12 kilometres (7 miles) southwest from its city center (municipality of Athens), and lies along the east coast of the Saronic Gulf. According to the 2011 census, Piraeus
Piraeus
had a population of 163,688 people within its administrative limits, making it the fourth largest municipality in Greece
Greece
and the second largest within the urban area of the Greek capital, following the municipality of Athens
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Corinth
Corinth
Corinth
(/ˈkɒrɪnθ/; Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos, pronounced [ˈkorinθos] ( listen)) is an ancient city and former municipality in Corinthia, Peloponnese, which is located in south-central Greece
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Megara
Megara
Megara
(/ˈmɛɡərə/; Greek: Μέγαρα, pronounced [ˈmeɣara]) is a historic town and a municipality in West Attica, Greece. It lies in the northern section of the Isthmus of Corinth
Corinth
opposite the island of Salamis, which belonged to Megara
Megara
in archaic times, before being taken by Athens. Megara
Megara
was one of the four districts of Attica, embodied in the four mythic sons of King Pandion II, of whom Nisos
Nisos
was the ruler of Megara. Megara
Megara
was also a trade port, its people using their ships and wealth as a way to gain leverage on armies of neighboring poleis. Megara
Megara
specialized in the exportation of wool and other animal products including livestock such as horses
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Argos
Argos
Argos
(/ˈɑːrɡɒs, -ɡəs/; Modern Greek: Άργος [ˈarɣos]; Ancient Greek: Ἄργος [árɡos]) is a city in Argolis, the Peloponnese, Greece
Greece
and once was one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world.[citation needed] It is the biggest town in Argolis
Argolis
and a major centre for the area. Since the 2011 local government reform it has been part of the municipality of Argos-Mykines, of which it is a municipal unit.[2] The municipal unit has an area of 138.138 km2.[3] It is 11 kilometres (7 miles) from Nafplion, which was its historic harbour
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Sparta
Coordinates: 37°4′55″N 22°25′25″E / 37.08194°N 22.42361°E / 37.08194; 22.42361LacedaemonΣπάρτα / Λακεδαίμων900s–192 BCLambda was used by the Spartan army
Spartan army
as a symbol of Lacedaemon (Λακεδαίμων)Territory of ancient SpartaCapital SpartaLanguages Doric GreekReligion Greek polytheismGovernment Diarchy OligarchyKing See listLegislature GerousiaHistorical era Classical antiquity •  Foundation 900s BC •  Messenian War 685–668 BC •  Battle of Thermopylae 480 BC •  Peloponnesian War 431–404 BC •  Battle of Mantinea 362 BC •  Annexed by Achaea 192 BCPreceded by Succeeded byGreek Dark AgesAchaean LeagueRoman RepublicThis article contains special characters. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols.Hollow Lacedaemon
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Magister Militum
Magister militum
Magister militum
( Latin
Latin
for "Master of the Soldiers", plural magistri militum) was a top-level military command used in the later Roman Empire, dating from the reign of Constantine the Great.[dubious – discuss] Used alone, the term referred to the senior military officer (equivalent to a war theatre commander, the emperor remaining the supreme commander) of the Empire
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Theodosius I
Theodosius I
Theodosius I
(Latin: Flavius Theodosius Augustus;[1] Greek: Θεοδόσιος Αʹ; 11 January 347 – 17 January 395), also known as Theodosius the Great, was Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
from AD 379 to AD 395, as the last emperor to rule over both the eastern and the western halves of the Roman Empire. On accepting his elevation, he campaigned against Goths
Goths
and other barbarians who had invaded the empire. He failed to kill, expel, or entirely subjugate them, and after the Gothic War, they established a homeland south of the Danube, in Illyricum, within the empire's borders
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Praetorian Prefecture Of Illyricum
The praetorian prefecture of Illyricum (Latin: praefectura praetorio per Illyricum; Greek: ἐπαρχότης/ὑπαρχία [τῶν πραιτωρίων] τοῦ Ἰλλυρικοῦ, also termed simply the Prefecture of Illyricum) was one of four praetorian prefectures into which the Late Roman Empire
Roman Empire
was divided. The administrative centre of the prefecture was Sirmium
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