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Alan J. Pakula
Alan Jay Pakula (/pəˈkuːlə/; April 7, 1928 – November 19, 1998) was an American film director, writer and producer. He was nominated for three Academy Awards: Best Picture for To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), Best Director for All the President's Men (1976) and Best Adapted Screenplay for Sophie's Choice (1982). Pakula was also notable for directing his "paranoia trilogy": All the President's Men, Klute
Klute
(1971), and The Parallax View
The Parallax View
(1974).Contents1 Career 2 Personal life 3 Death 4 Filmography 5 References 6 External linksCareer[edit] Pakula started his Hollywood career as an assistant in the cartoon department at Warner Brothers. In 1957, he undertook his first production role for Paramount Pictures. In 1962, he produced To Kill a Mockingbird, for which he was nominated for a Best Picture Academy Award
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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Meryl Streep
Mary Louise "Meryl" Streep (born June 22, 1949) is an American actress. Cited in the media as the "best actress of her generation",[1][2][3] Streep is particularly known for her versatility and accent adaptation. Nominated for a record 21 Academy Awards, she has won three. Streep has also received 31 Golden Globe
Golden Globe
nominations, winning eight—more nominations and competitive wins than any other performer.[4] Streep made her stage debut in Trelawny of the Wells
Trelawny of the Wells
in 1975. In 1976, she received a Tony Award
Tony Award
nomination for Best Featured Actress in a Play for 27 Wagons Full of Cotton. In 1977, she made her screen debut in the television film The Deadliest Season, and also made her film debut in Julia. In 1978, she won an Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for her role in the mini-series Holocaust, and received her first Academy Award nomination for The Deer Hunter
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Jane Fonda
Jane Seymour
Jane Seymour
Fonda[1] (born December 21, 1937)[2] is an American actress, writer, political activist, former fashion model and fitness guru. She is a two-time Academy Award
Academy Award
winner and two-time BAFTA Award winner. In 2014, she was the recipient of the American Film Institute AFI Life Achievement Award. Fonda made her Broadway debut in the 1960 play There Was a Little Girl, for which she received the first of two Tony Award
Tony Award
nominations, and made her screen debut later the same year in Tall Story. She rose to fame in 1960s films such as Period of Adjustment (1962), Walk on the Wild Side (1962), Sunday in New York
Sunday in New York
(1963), Cat Ballou
Cat Ballou
(1965), Barefoot in the Park (1967) and Barbarella (1968). Her first husband was Barbarella director Roger Vadim
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Academy Awards
MoonlightBest Picture The Shape of WaterThe Academy Awards, also known as the Oscars,[1] are a set of 24 awards for artistic and technical merit in the American film industry, given annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), to recognize excellence in cinematic achievements as assessed by the Academy's voting membership. The various category winners are awarded a copy of a golden statuette, officially called the "Academy Award of Merit", which has become commonly known by its nickname "Oscar". The sculpture was created by George Stanley.[2] The awards, first presented in 1929 at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, are overseen by AMPAS.[3][4] The awards ceremony was first broadcast on radio in 1930 and televised for the first time in 1953. It is now seen live in more than 200 countries and can be streamed live online.[5] The Academy Awards ceremony is the oldest worldwide entertainment awards ceremony
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Watergate Scandal
The Watergate scandal
Watergate scandal
was a major political scandal that occurred in the United States during the early 1970s, following a break-in by five men at the Democratic National Committee
Democratic National Committee
(DNC) headquarters at the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
on June 17, 1972, and President Richard Nixon's administration's subsequent attempt to cover up its involvement. After the five burglars were caught and the conspiracy was discovered, Watergate was investigated by the United States Congress. Meanwhile, Nixon's administration resisted its probes, which led to a constitutional crisis.[1] The term Watergate, by metonymy, has come to encompass an array of clandestine and often illegal activities undertaken by members of the Nixon administration
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Melville, New York
Melville is an affluent hamlet and census-designated place (CDP) in the Town of Huntington in Suffolk County on Long Island, New York, in the United States. The population was 18,985 at the 2010 census.[1]Contents1 Location 2 Economy2.1 Media3 History and characteristics 4 Geography4.1 Climate5 Demographics of the CDP 6 Education 7 Fire protection 8 References 9 External linksLocation[edit] Melville lies directly east of the boundary with Nassau County. The Long Island Expressway (LIE) and Northern State Parkway, two of the country's busiest highways and major points of entry in and out of New York City, pass through Melville. Melville is located immediately off Exit 49 of the LIE. New York State Route 110 runs through the center of Melville. Economy[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Carl Bernstein
Carl Bernstein (/ˈbɜːrnstiːn/ BURN-steen; born February 14, 1944) is an American investigative journalist and author. While a young reporter for The Washington Post in 1972, Bernstein was teamed up with Bob Woodward; the two did much of the original news reporting on the Watergate scandal. These scandals led to numerous government investigations and the eventual resignation of President Richard Nixon. The work of Woodward and Bernstein was called "maybe the single greatest reporting effort of all time" by longtime journalism figure Gene Roberts.[1] Bernstein's career since Watergate has continued to focus on the theme of the use and abuse of power via books and magazine articles. He has also done reporting for television and opinion commentary
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Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Lee Hoffman (born August 8, 1937) is an American actor and director, with a career in film, television, and theater since 1960.[2] Hoffman has been known for his versatile portrayals of antiheroes and vulnerable characters.[3] He won the Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Actor in 1980 for Kramer vs. Kramer, and in 1989 for Rain Man. Hoffman first drew critical praise for starring in the play, Eh?, for which he won a Theatre World Award and a Drama Desk Award. This achievement was soon followed by his breakthrough 1967 film role as Benjamin Braddock, the title character in The Graduate. Since that time, Hoffman's career has largely been focused on the cinema, with sporadic returns to television and to the stage. Hoffman's films include Midnight Cowboy, Little Big Man, Straw Dogs, Papillon, Lenny, Marathon Man, All the President's Men, Kramer vs. Kramer, Tootsie, Rain Man, Hook, and Wag the Dog
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Scott Turow
Scott Frederick Turow[1] (born April 12, 1949) is an American author and lawyer. Turow has written eleven fiction and three nonfiction books, which have been translated into more than 40 languages and sold more than 30 million copies.[2] Films have been based on several of his books.Contents1 Life and career 2 Bibliography2.1 Kindle County 2.2 Other Novels 2.3 As Editor 2.4 Non-fiction 2.5 Reception3 Films 4 Awards 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksLife and career[edit] Turow was born in Chicago, to a family of Russian Jewish descent.[3] He attended New Trier High School, and graduated from Amherst College in 1970, as a brother of the Alpha Delta Phi
Alpha Delta Phi
Literary Society.[4] He received an Edith Mirrielees Fellowship to Stanford University’s Creative Writing Center, where he attended from 1970 to 1972. Turow later became a Jones Lecturer at Stanford, serving until 1975, when he entered Harvard Law School
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Paranoia
Paranoia is an instinct or thought process believed to be heavily influenced by anxiety or fear, often to the point of delusion and irrationality.[1] Paranoid thinking typically includes persecutory, or beliefs of conspiracy concerning a perceived threat towards oneself (e.g. the American parochial phrase,"Everyone is out to get me"). Paranoia is distinct from phobias, which also involve irrational fear, but usually no blame. Making false accusations and the general distrust of others also frequently accompany paranoia. For example, an incident most people would view as an accident or coincidence, a paranoid person might believe was intentional
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John Grisham
John Ray Grisham Jr. (/ˈɡrɪʃəm/; born February 8, 1955)[2][3] is an American bestselling writer, attorney, politician, and activist best known for his popular legal thrillers. His books have been translated into 42 languages and published worldwide. John Grisham
John Grisham
graduated from Mississippi State University
Mississippi State University
before attending the University of Mississippi School of Law
University of Mississippi School of Law
in 1981. He practiced criminal law for about a decade and served in the House of Representatives in Mississippi
Mississippi
from January 1984 to September 1990.[4] His first novel, A Time to Kill, was published in June 1989, four years after he began writing it
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Harrison Ford
Harrison Ford
Harrison Ford
(born July 13, 1942) is an American actor and film producer. He gained worldwide fame for his starring roles as Han Solo in the Star Wars
Star Wars
film series and as the title character of the Indiana Jones film series
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The Bronx
The Bronx
The Bronx
(/brɒŋks/) is the northernmost of the five boroughs of New York City within the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York. It is south of Westchester County; north and east of Manhattan, across the Harlem River; and north of Queens, across the East River. Since 1914, the borough has had the same boundaries as Bronx County, the third-most densely populated county in the United States.[2] The Bronx
The Bronx
has a land area of 42 square miles (109 km2) and a population of 1,471,160 in 2017.[1] Of the five boroughs, it has the fourth-largest area, fourth-highest population, and third-highest population density.[2] It is the only borough predominantly on the U.S. mainland. The Bronx
The Bronx
is divided by the Bronx River
Bronx River
into a hillier section in the west, and a flatter eastern section
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The Hill School
The Hill School
The Hill School
(commonly known as "The Hill") is a coeducational preparatory boarding school located on a 200-acre (81 ha) campus.[4] in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, about 35 mi (56 km) northwest of Philadelphia. The Hill is part of the Ten Schools Admission Organization (TSAO). The school is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Elementary and Secondary Schools.[2]Contents1 History 2 School life 3 Academics3.1 Foreign languages 3.2 Partner schools4 Athletics 5 Culture 6 In popular culture6.1 Film7 Notable alumni 8 Headmasters 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] The Hill School
The Hill School
was founded in 1851 by the Rev. Matthew Meigs
Matthew Meigs
as the Family Boarding School for Boys and Young Men
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Pottstown, Pennsylvania
Pottstown is a borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, United States about 40 miles (55 km) northwest of Philadelphia
Philadelphia
and 20 miles (32 km) southeast of Reading, on the Schuylkill River. Pottstown was laid out in 1752–53 and named Pottsgrove in honor of its founder, John Potts. The old name was abandoned at the time of the incorporation as a borough in 1815. In 1888, the limits of the borough were considerably extended. Pottstown is the center of a productive farming and dairying region. In the past, its iron and steel interests were very extensive. There were large rolling mills, furnaces, nail works, textile mills, bridge works, agricultural-implement works, boiler and machine shops, foundries, and manufactories of bricks, silks, shirts, hosiery, etc. In 1900, 13,696 people lived there; in 1910, 15,599; in 1920, 17,431; and in 1940, 20,194 people lived there
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