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Al-Mutawakkil Al-Qasim
Al-Mutawakkil al-Qasim (died April 23, 1727) was an Imam
Imam
of Yemen
Yemen
who ruled in 1716–1727. He belonged to the Qasimid
Qasimid
family, that was descended from Muhammad
Muhammad
and dominated the Zaidi imamate of Yemen
Yemen
in 1597–1962.Contents1 Usurpation of power 2 Reign 3 See also 4 ReferencesUsurpation of power[edit] Al-Qasim bin al-Husayn was a grandson of Imam
Imam
al-Mahdi Ahmad (d. 1681), and the nephew of Imam
Imam
al-Mahdi Muhammad
Muhammad
(d. 1718). During the reign of his uncle, he was a military commander of note, and chasticed the Hashid tribes in 1707. For some time he was imprisoned by the ruler. In 1716, however, al-Mahdi Muhammad
Muhammad
was badly cornered by the rival imam al-Mansur al-Husayn
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Imam
Imam
Imam
(/ɪˈmɑːm/; Arabic: إمام‎ imām; plural: أئمة aʼimmah) is an Islamic leadership position. It is most commonly used as the title of a worship leader of a mosque and Muslim
Muslim
community among Sunni
Sunni
Muslims
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History Of Yemen
Yemen
Yemen
is one of the oldest centers of civilization in the Near East.[1] Its relatively fertile land and adequate rainfall in a moister climate helped sustain a stable population, a feature recognized by the ancient Greek geographer Ptolemy, who described Yemen
Yemen
as Eudaimon Arabia
Arabia
(better known in its Latin translation, Arabia
Arabia
Felix) meaning "fortunate Arabia" or "Happy Arabia"
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Muhammad
Muhammad[n 1] (Arabic: محمد‎; pronounced [muħammad];[n 2] French: Mahomet /məˈhɒmɪt/; Latinized as Mahometus c. 570 CE – 8 June 632 CE)[1] was the founder of Islam.[2][3] According to Islamic doctrine, he was a prophet and God's messenger, sent to present and confirm the monotheistic teachings preached previously by Adam, Abraham, Moses, Jesus, and other prophets.[3][4][5][6] He is viewed as the final prophet of God
God
in all the main branches of Islam, though some modern denominations diverge from this belief.[n 3]
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Zaidiyyah
Zaidiyyah
Zaidiyyah
or Zaidism (Arabic: الزيدية‎ az-zaydiyya, adjective form Zaidi or Zaydi) is one of the Shia
Shia
sects closest in terms of theology to Hanafi
Hanafi
Sunni
Sunni
Islam.[1] Zaidiyyah
Zaidiyyah
emerged in the eighth century out of Shi'a
Shi'a
Islam.[2] Zaidis are named after Zayd ibn ʻAlī, the grandson of Husayn ibn ʻAlī and the son of their fourth Imam Ali ibn 'Husain.[2] Followers of the Zaydi Islamic jurisprudence
Islamic jurisprudence
are called Zaydi and make up about 35–42% of Muslims in Yemen, with the vast majority of Shia
Shia
Muslims in the country being Zaydi.[3][4] Zaidis dismiss religious dissimulation (taqiyya).[5] Zaydis were the oldest branch of the Shia
Shia
and are currently the second largest group after Twelvers
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Imamate
Imamate
Imamate
(Arabic: إمامة‎ imāmah) is a word derived from imam and meaning "leadership". Its use in theology is confined to Shia. An imam is the head or leader of an imamate and is similar to a caliph or khalifah with one major difference: While a caliph is more of a political head of a state, the imam (in imamate) is a religious as well as a political head of a group of people
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Al-Mahdi Ahmad
Al-Mahdi Ahmad (1633 – July 10, 1681) was an Imam of Yemen, who ruled in 1676–1681. He belonged to the Qasimid family that was descended from Muhammad.Contents1 Struggle for the imamate 2 Reign 3 See also 4 ReferencesStruggle for the imamate[edit] Ahmad was a son of al-Hasan bin al-Qasim (d. 1639), a brother of the former imam al-Mutawakkil Isma'il. In the reign of his uncle, in 1658, he led forces that loosely incorporated Hadramaut in the Yemeni kingdom. When al-Mutawakkil Isma'il died, the imamate was claimed by Ahmad. He had, however, to fight his cousin and rival al-Qasim who controlled Shaharah, an almost impregnable fortress north of San'a. Ahmad collected forces which besieged Shaharah and forced al-Qasim to accept his claim.[1] Reign[edit] At his accession, the imam was already a mature man in his upper forties. He upheld the Yemeni suzerainty in Hadramaut, and was reported to be a pious figure. His residence was al-Ghiras north-east of San'a
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Hashid
The Hashid (Arabic: حاشد‎; Musnad: 𐩢𐩦𐩵𐩣) is a tribal confederation in Yemen. It is the second or third largest – after Bakil (Bakkil) and, depending on sources, Madhḥaj[1][2] – yet generally recognized as the strongest and most influential.[1][3] According to medieval Yemeni genealogies, Hashid and Bakil were the sons of Jashim bin Jubran bin Nawf Bin Tuba'a bin Zayd bin Amr bin Hamdan. Member tribes of the Hashid Confederation are found primarily in the mountains in the North and Northwest of the country.[4] In recent times, Hashid confederation had for decades been led by the powerful Al-Ahmar clan
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Yemen
Coordinates: 15°N 48°E / 15°N 48°E / 15; 48Republic of Yemen اَلْـجُـمْـهُـوْرِيَّـة الْـيَـمَـنِـيَّـة (Arabic) al-Jumhūrīyah al-YamanīyahFlagEmblemMotto:  الله، اَلْـوَطَـن، اَلـثَّـوْرَة، اَلْـوَحْـدَة (Arabic) "Allāh, al-Waṭan, ath-Thawrah, al-Waḥdah" "God, Country, Revolution, Unity"Anthem: اَلْـجُـمْـهُـوْرِيَّـة الْـمُـتَّـحِـدَة (Arabic) al-Jumhūrīyah al-Muttaḥidah (English: "United Republic")Location of  Yemen  (red)Capital and largest city Sana'aOfficial languages ArabicReligion IslamDemonym Yemeni, YemeniteGovernment Provisional government• President
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San'a
Sana'a
Sana'a
(Arabic: صنعاء‎ Ṣan‘ā’ pronounced [sˤɑnʕaːʔ], Yemeni Arabic: [ˈsˤɑnʕɑ]), also spelled Sanaa or Sana, is the largest city in Yemen
Yemen
and the centre of Sana'a
Sana'a
Governorate. The city is not part of the Governorate, but forms the separate administrative district of "Amanat Al-Asemah". Under the Yemeni constitution, Sana'a
Sana'a
is the capital of the country,[1] although the seat of the internationally recognised government moved to Aden
Aden
in the aftermath of the 2014–15 Yemeni coup d'état. Aden
Aden
was declared as the temporary capital by President Abdrabbuh Mansur Hadi
Abdrabbuh Mansur Hadi
in March 2015.[2] Sana'a
Sana'a
is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world
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An-Nasir Muhammad
Al-Malik an-Nasir Nasir ad-Din Muhammad ibn Qalawun
Qalawun
(Arabic: الملك الناصر ناصر الدين محمد بن قلاوون‎), commonly known as an-Nasir Muhammad (Arabic: الناصر محمد‎), or by his kunya: Abu al-Ma'ali (أبو المعالى) or as Ibn Qalawun
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Da'wah
Da‘wah (also daawa or daawah; Arabic: دعوة‎ "invitation") is the proselytizing or preaching of Islam.Contents1 Etymology 2 Early Islam 3 During Muhammad's era3.1 Post-Muhammad4 Purpose 5 Proselytism 6 Proselytizing methods6.1 Gentleness 6.2 Influence in politics 6.3 Wisdom 6.4 Speaking a common language 6.5 Location7 Proselytizing movements 8 See also 9 Footnotes 10 References 11 External linksEtymology[edit] Da‘wah literally means "issuing a summons" or "making an invitation", being a gerund of a verb meaning variously "to summon" or "to invite" (whose triconsonantal root is d-ʕ-w دعو)
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Bakil
The Bakil (Arabic: بكيل‎) federation is the largest tribal federation in Yemen. The tribe consists of more than 8 million men and women who are led by the Abulohom and Alshaif families. The member tribes of the Bakil Confederation are found primarily in the far north of the country; its leaders today are the Abulohom and Alshaif families.Contents1 Ancient history 2 Conversion to Islam 3 After Ali, power vacuum in Yemen
Yemen
and the Imam Hadi 4 Modern history 5 See also 6 Bibliography 7 References 8 External linksAncient history[edit] Hashid and Bakil were the sons of Jashim bin Jubran bin Nawf bin Tuba'a bin Zayd bin Amro bin Hamdan. Bani Hamdan was already a well known clan in the 1st century AD and it was mentioned in Sabean inscriptions. Therefore, Hashid and Bakil (the brothers) must have lived in the BC era
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Qasimid
The Imams of Yemen
Yemen
and later the Kings of Yemen
Yemen
were religiously consecrated leaders belonging to the Zaidiyyah
Zaidiyyah
branch of Shia
Shia
Islam. They established a blend of religious and secular rule in parts of Yemen
Yemen
from 897. Their imamate endured under varying circumstances until the republican revolution in 1962. Zaidiyyah
Zaidiyyah
theology differed from Ismailis
Ismailis
or Twelver Shi'ites
Twelver Shi'ites
by stressing the presence of an active and visible imam as leader. The imam was expected to be knowledgeable in religious sciences, and to prove himself a worthy headman of the community, even in battle if this was necessary. A claimant of the imamate would proclaim a "call" (da'wa), and there were not infrequently more than one claimant.[1] The historian Ibn Khaldun (d
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Imams Of Yemen
The Imams of Yemen
Yemen
and later the Kings of Yemen
Yemen
were religiously consecrated leaders belonging to the Zaidiyyah
Zaidiyyah
branch of Shia Islam. They established a blend of religious and secular rule in parts of Yemen
Yemen
from 897. Their imamate endured under varying circumstances until the republican revolution in 1962. Zaidiyyah
Zaidiyyah
theology differed from Sevener
Sevener
or Twelver Shi'ites
Twelver Shi'ites
by stressing the presence of an active and visible imam as leader. The imam was expected to be knowledgeable in religious scholarship, and to prove himself a worthy headman of the community, even in battle if this was necessary
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