HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Al-Hakim Mosque
The Mosque
Mosque
of al-Hakim (Arabic: مسجد الحاكم بأمر الله‎, translit. Masjid al-Ḥākim bi Amr Allāh), nicknamed al-Anwar (Arabic: الانور‎, lit. 'the Illuminated'),[1] is a major Islamic religious site in Cairo, Egypt. It is named after Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah
Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah
(985–1021), the sixth Fatimid
Fatimid
caliph and 16th Ismaili
Ismaili
Imam. The mosque was originally built as an enclosure by the Fatimid
Fatimid
vizier Gawhar Al-Siqilli (c. 928–992), but was incorporated into the extended fortifications built by Badr al-Jamali. It consists of an irregular rectangle with four arcades surrounding the courtyard. An unusual feature is the monumental entrance with its projecting stone porch
[...More...]

"Al-Hakim Mosque" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Napoleon
Napoléon Bonaparte (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a French statesman and military leader who rose to prominence during the French Revolution and led several successful campaigns during the French Revolutionary Wars. As Napoleon, he was Emperor of the French
Emperor of the French
from 1804 until 1814, and again briefly in 1815 during the Hundred Days. Napoleon
Napoleon
dominated European and global affairs for more than a decade while leading France
France
against a series of coalitions in the Napoleonic Wars. He won most of these wars and the vast majority of his battles, building a large empire that ruled over continental Europe before its final collapse in 1815. He is considered one of the greatest commanders in history, and his wars and campaigns are studied at military schools worldwide
[...More...]

"Napoleon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Literal Translation
Literal translation, direct translation, or word-for-word translation is the rendering of text from one language to another one word at a time (Latin: "verbum pro verbo") with or without conveying the sense of the original whole. In translation studies, "literal translation" denotes technical translation of scientific, technical, technological or legal texts.[1] In translation theory, another term for "literal translation" is "metaphrase"; and for phrasal ("sense") translation — "paraphrase." When considered a bad practice of conveying word by word (lexeme to lexeme, or morpheme to lexeme) translation of non-technical type literal translations has the meaning of mistranslating idioms,[2] for example, or in the context of translating an analytic language to a synthetic language, it renders even the grammar unintelligible. The concept of literal translation may be viewed as an oxymoron (contradiction in terms), given that literal denotes something existing without interpretation, where
[...More...]

"Literal Translation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Saladin
An-Nasir
An-Nasir
Salah ad-Din Yusuf
Yusuf
ibn Ayyub (Arabic: صلاح الدين يوسف بن أيوب‎ / ALA-LC: Ṣalāḥ ad-Dīn Yūsuf ibn Ayyūb; Kurdish: سەلاحەدینی ئەییووبی‎ / ALA-LC: Selahedînê Eyûbî), known as Salah ad-Din or Saladin (/ˈsælədɪn/; 1137 – 4 March 1193), was the first sultan of Egypt
Egypt
and Syria[4] and the founder of the Ayyubid
Ayyubid
dynasty. A Sunni Muslim of Kurdish ethnicity,[5][6][7] Saladin
Saladin
led the Muslim military campaign against the Crusader states in the Levant
[...More...]

"Saladin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Crusades
After 1291Smyrniote 1343–1351 Alexandrian 1365 Savoyard 1366 Barbary 1390 Nicopolis 1396 Varna
Varna
1443 Portuguese 1481 Northern Crusades
Northern Crusades
(1147–1410)Wendish 1147 Swedish1150 1249 1293Livonian 1198–1290 Prussian 1217–1274 Lithuan
[...More...]

"Crusades" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Abu Al-Abbas Al-Mursi Mosque
Al-Mursi Abu'l-'Abbas (1219 in Murcia – 1287 CE) (Arabic: المرسي أبو العباس‎) is a Sufi saint from Al-Andalus of the Moroccan Merinid dynasty who later in his life moved to Alexandria in Egypt. His complete name is Shahab al-Din Abu'l-'Abbas Ahmad ibn 'Umar ibn Mohammad al-Ansari al-Mursi. Al-Mursi Abul-'Abbas, as he is now commonly called, is one of the four master saints of Egypt, the other three being Ahmad al-Badawi, al-Dessouqi and al-Haggag. His legacy and reverence in Egypt were such that Mursi became a common name in the country.Contents1 In al-Andalus 2 Meeting al-Shadhili 3 His mosque in Alexandria 4 BibliographyIn al-Andalus[edit] Shahab was born in Murcia in al-Andalus, in 616 H (1219 CE) to a wealthy family in the trading business and was well educated in religious sciences. He grew up helping his father in the trading business. He was known for his honesty and for his many contributions to the needy
[...More...]

"Abu Al-Abbas Al-Mursi Mosque" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Abu Al-'Ila Mosque
A mosque (/mɒsk/; from Arabic: مَـسْـجِـد‎, translit. masjid) is a place of worship for Muslims. There are strict and detailed requirements in Sunni jurisprudence (Arabic: فِـقْـه‎, fiqh) for a place of worship to be considered a mosque, with places that do not meet these requirements regarded as musallas.[1] There are stringent restrictions on the uses of the area formally demarcated as the mosque (which is often a small portion of the larger complex), and in the Islamic Sharī‘ah (Arabic: شَـرِيْـعَـة‎, Law), after an area is formally designated as a mosque, it remains so until the Last Day.[1] Many mosques have elaborate domes, minarets, and prayer halls, in varying styles of architecture. Mosques originated on the Arabian Peninsula, but are now found in all inhabited continents
[...More...]

"Abu Al-'Ila Mosque" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Badr Al-Jamali
Abū'l-Najm Badr ibn ʿAbdallāh al-Jamālī al-Mustanṣirī,[1] better known as Badr al-Jamali (Arabic: بدر الجمالى‎‎, 1015–1094) was a vizier and prominent statesman for the Fatimid Caliphate under Caliph al-Mustansir
[...More...]

"Badr Al-Jamali" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Gawhar Al-Siqilli
Jawhar (Arabic: جوهر‎; fl. 966–d. 992) was a Fatimid general. Under the command of Caliph
Caliph
Al-Mu'izz, he led the conquest of North Africa and then of Egypt,[1] founded the city of Cairo[2] and the great al-Azhar Mosque. A Greek slave by origin, he was freed by Al-Mu'izz.[3]Contents1 Biography 2 Epithets 3 See also 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksBiography[edit] Jawhar was a Sicilian ghulam of Greek ethnicity.[4][5][6][7][8] His family originated from the Emirate of Sicily
Sicily
(hence the epithet الصقلي = the Sicilian), and came as a slave to North Africa. He was sent to the Fatimid Caliph
Caliph
Ismail al-Mansur
Ismail al-Mansur
on account of his intelligence and cunning. Under his son al-Muizz (953-975) he gained his freedom and became his personal secretary. Soon he was the vizier and the highest-ranking military commander of the Fatimids
[...More...]

"Gawhar Al-Siqilli" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vizier
A vizier (/vɪˈzɪər/, rarely /ˈvɪziər/;[1] Arabic: وزير‎ wazīr; Persian: وازیر‬‎ vazīr; Turkish: vezir; Chinese: 宰相 zǎixiàng; Bengali: উজির ujira'; Hindustani (Hindi-Urdu): वज़ीर or وزیر‬ vazeer, sometimes spelled vazir, vizir, vasir, wazir, vesir, or vezir), is a high-ranking political advisor or minister.[2] The Abbasid
Abbasid
caliphs gave the title wazir to a minister formerly called katib (secretary) who was at first merely a helper, but afterwards became the representative and successor of the dapir (official scribe or secretary) of the Sassanian kings.[3] In modern usage, the ter
[...More...]

"Vizier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Al-Burdayni Mosque
A mosque (/mɒsk/; from Arabic: مَـسْـجِـد‎, translit. masjid) is a place of worship for Muslims. There are strict and detailed requirements in Sunni jurisprudence (Arabic: فِـقْـه‎, fiqh) for a place of worship to be considered a mosque, with places that do not meet these requirements regarded as musallas.[1] There are stringent restrictions on the uses of the area formally demarcated as the mosque (which is often a small portion of the larger complex), and in the Islamic Sharī‘ah (Arabic: شَـرِيْـعَـة‎, Law), after an area is formally designated as a mosque, it remains so until the Last Day.[1] Many mosques have elaborate domes, minarets, and prayer halls, in varying styles of architecture. Mosques originated on the Arabian Peninsula, but are now found in all inhabited continents
[...More...]

"Al-Burdayni Mosque" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Al-Hussein Mosque
A mosque (/mɒsk/; from Arabic: مَـسْـجِـد‎, translit. masjid) is a place of worship for Muslims. There are strict and detailed requirements in Sunni jurisprudence (Arabic: فِـقْـه‎, fiqh) for a place of worship to be considered a mosque, with places that do not meet these requirements regarded as musallas.[1] There are stringent restrictions on the uses of the area formally demarcated as the mosque (which is often a small portion of the larger complex), and in the Islamic Sharī‘ah (Arabic: شَـرِيْـعَـة‎, Law), after an area is formally designated as a mosque, it remains so until the Last Day.[1] Many mosques have elaborate domes, minarets, and prayer halls, in varying styles of architecture. Mosques originated on the Arabian Peninsula, but are now found in all inhabited continents
[...More...]

"Al-Hussein Mosque" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Romanization Of Arabic
The romanization of Arabic
Arabic
writes written and spoken Arabic
Arabic
in the Latin script
Latin script
in one of various systematic ways. Romanized Arabic
Arabic
is used for a number of different purposes, among them transcription of names and titles, cataloging Arabic language
Arabic language
works, language education when used in lieu of or alongside the Arabic
Arabic
script, and representation of the language in scientific publications by linguists
[...More...]

"Romanization Of Arabic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dawoodi Bohra
The Dawoodi Bohras are a sect within the Ismā'īlī
Ismā'īlī
branch of Shia Islam.[1][2] Dawoodi mainly reside in the western cities of India
India
and also in Pakistan, Yemen
Yemen
and East Africa.[3] The main language of the community is "Lisan al-Dawat", a dialect of Gujarati with inclusions from Arabic, Urdu and other languages. The Script used is Perso-Arabic. When in communal attire, a Dawoodi male has a form of tunic called kurta, equally lengthy overcoat dress called saya, and an izaar typically donned underneath, all of which are mostly white, along with a white and golden cap called topi. Most men have a beard
[...More...]

"Dawoodi Bohra" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.