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Aksaray
Aksaray
Aksaray
(pronounced [ˈaksaɾaj]) is a city in the Central Anatolia
Anatolia
region of Turkey
Turkey
and the capital district of Aksaray Province. According to 2009 census figures, the population of the province is 376 907 of which 171,423 live in the city of Aksaray.[3][4] The district covers an area of 4,589 km2 (1,772 sq mi),[5] and the average elevation is 980 m (3,215 ft), with the highest point being Mt
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Ibn Battuta
Muhammad
Muhammad
Ibn Battuta
Ibn Battuta
(or Ibn Baṭūṭah) (/ˌɪbənbætˈtuːtɑː/; Arabic: محمد ابن بطوطة‎; fully ʾAbū ʿAbd al-Lāh Muḥammad ibn ʿAbd al-Lāh l-Lawātī ṭ-Ṭanǧī ibn Baṭūṭah; Arabic: أبو عبد الله محمد بن عبد الله اللواتي الطنجي بن بطوطة) (February 25, 1304 – 1368 or 1369) was a Moroccan scholar who widely travelled the medieval world.[1][2] Over a period of thirty years, Ibn Battuta visited most of the Islamic world and many non-Muslim lands, including North Africa, the Horn of Africa, West Africa, the Middle East, Central Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia
South Asia
and China
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Byzantine Emperor
This is a list of the Byzantine emperors from the foundation of Constantinople
Constantinople
in 330 AD, which marks the conventional start of the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
(or the Eastern Roman Empire), to its fall to the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
in 1453 AD. Only the emperors who were recognized as legitimate rulers and exercised sovereign authority are included, to the exclusion of junior co-emperors (symbasileis) who never attained the status of sole or senior ruler, as well as of the various usurpers or rebels who claimed the imperial title. Traditionally, the line of Byzantine emperors is held to begin with the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great, the first Christian emperor, who rebuilt the city of Byzantium
Byzantium
as an imperial capital, Constantinople, and who was regarded by the later emperors as the model ruler
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Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western) Nicomedia
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Aplekton
Aplekton (Greek: ἄπληκτον, from Latin: applicatum) was a Byzantine term used in the 10th–14th centuries for a fortified army base (in this sense similar to the metaton) and later in the Palaiologan period
Palaiologan period
for the obligation of billeting soldiers.[1] History and functions[edit] The institution of the aplekta as major assembly areas, where stores of supplies were kept and where the provincial armies of the themata were to join the main imperial force for a campaign, date most probably to the reign of Emperor Constantine V
Constantine V
(r. 741–775).[2] Of these, the camp of Malagina in Bithynia
Bithynia
was the nearest to the capital of Constantinople, and is mentioned as early as 786/787.[2] Other such bases existed in Anatolia. Emperor Basil I
Basil I
(r
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First Council Of Nicaea
The First Council of Nicaea
Nicaea
(/naɪˈsiːə/; Greek: Νίκαια [ˈnikεa]) was a council of Christian bishops convened in the Bithynian city of Nicaea
Nicaea
(now İznik, Bursa province, Turkey) by the Roman Emperor Constantine I
Constantine I
in AD 325. Constantine I
Constantine I
organized the council along the lines of the Roman Senate
Roman Senate
and presided over it, but did not cast any official vote. This ecumenical council was the first effort to attain consensus in the Church through an assembly representing all of Christendom
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Basil The Great
Basil
Basil
UK: /ˈbæzəl/;[1] US: /ˈbeɪzəl/[2] ( Ocimum
Ocimum
basilicum), also called great basil or Saint-Joseph's-wort, is a culinary herb of the family Lamiaceae
Lamiaceae
(mints). The name "basil" comes from Latin, Basilius, and Greek βασιλικόν φυτόν (basilikón phutón), "royal/kingly plant".[3] Basil
Basil
is native to tropical regions from central Africa to Southeast Asia.[4] It is a tender plant, and is used in cuisines worldwide. Depending on the species and cultivar, the leaves may taste somewhat like anise, with a strong, pungent, often sweet smell. There are many varieties of Ocimum
Ocimum
basilicum, as well as several related species or hybrids also called basil. The type used commonly as a flavor is typically called sweet basil (or Genovese basil), as opposed to Thai basil
Thai basil
(O. basilicum var
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Gregory Of Nazianzus
Gregory of Nazianzus (Greek: Γρηγόριος ὁ Ναζιανζηνός Grēgorios ho Nazianzēnos; c. 329[2] – 25 January 390[2][3]), also known as Gregory the Theologian
Theologian
or Gregory Nazianzen, was a 4th-century Archbishop of Constantinople, and theologian. He is widely considered the most accomplished rhetorical stylist of the patristic age.[4] As a classically trained orator and philosopher he infused Hellenism into the early church, establishing the paradigm of Byzantine theologians and church officials.[4] Gregory made a significant impact on the shape of Trinitarian theology among both Greek- and Latin-speaking theologians, and he is remembered as the "Trinitarian Theologian". Much of his theological work continues to influence modern theologians, especially in regard to the relationship among the three Persons of the Trinity
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First Council Of Constantinople
The First Council of Constantinople
Constantinople
(Greek: Πρώτη σύνοδος της Κωνσταντινουπόλεως commonly known as Greek: Β΄ Οικουμενική, "Second Ecumenical"; Latin: Concilium Constantinopolitanum Primum or Latin: Concilium Constantinopolitanum A) was a council of Christian bishops convened in Constantinople
Constantinople
in AD 381 by the Roman Emperor Theodosius I.[1][2] This second ecumenical council, an effort to attain consensus in the church through an assembly representing all of Christendom,[3] confirmed the Nicene Creed, expanding the doctrine thereof to produce the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed, and dealt with sundry other matters
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Council Of Ephesus
The Council of Ephesus
Ephesus
was a council of Christian bishops convened in Ephesus
Ephesus
(near present-day Selçuk
Selçuk
in Turkey) in AD 431 by the Roman Emperor Theodosius II. This third ecumenical council, an effort to attain consensus in the church through an assembly representing all of Christendom,[1] confirmed the original Nicene Creed,[2] and condemned the teachings of Nestorius, Patriarch of Constantinople, who held that the Virgin Mary
Virgin Mary
may be called the Christotokos, "Birth Giver of Christ" but not the Theotokos, "Birth Giver of God"
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Roman Province
In Ancient Rome, a province (Latin: provincia, pl. provinciae) was the basic, and, until the Tetrarchy
Tetrarchy
(293 AD), largest territorial and administrative unit of the empire's territorial possessions outside Italy. The word province in modern English has its origins in the term used by the Romans. Provinces were generally governed by politicians of senatorial rank, usually former consuls or former praetors. A later exception was the province of Egypt, incorporated by Augustus
Augustus
after the death of Cleopatra: it was ruled by a governor of equestrian rank only, perhaps as a discouragement to senatorial ambition
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Cappadocia Tertia
Cappadocia
Cappadocia
was a province of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in Anatolia
Anatolia
(modern central-eastern Turkey), with its capital at Caesarea. It was established in 17 AD by the Emperor Tiberius
Tiberius
(ruled 14-37 AD), following the death of Cappadocia's last king, Archelaus. Cappadocia
Cappadocia
was an imperial province, meaning that its governor (legatus Augusti) was directly appointed by the emperor
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Leo I The Thracian
Leo I (Latin: Flavius Valerius Leo Augustus; 401 – 18 January 474) was an Eastern Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
from 457 to 474. A native of Dacia Aureliana near historic Thrace,[1] he was known as Leo the Thracian (Greek: Λέων Α' ὁ Θρᾷξ Leōn ha ho Thrax). Ruling the Eastern Empire for nearly 20 years, Leo proved to be a capable ruler. He oversaw many ambitious political and military plans, aimed mostly for the aid of the faltering Western Roman Empire
Western Roman Empire
and recovering its former territories. He is notable for being the first Eastern Emperor to legislate in Greek rather than Latin.[2] He is commemorated as a Saint in the Orthodox Church, with his feast day on January 20.[3][4]Contents1 Reign 2 Marriage and children 3 See also 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksReign[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Silk Road
The Silk
Silk
Road was an ancient network of trade routes connecting the East and West which for centuries was central to cultural interaction between them.[1][2][3] The Silk
Silk
Road refers to both the terrestrial and the maritime routes connecting Asia with the Middle East
Middle East
and southern Europe. The Silk
Silk
Road derives its name from the lucrative trade in silk carried out along its length, beginning in the Han dynasty
Han dynasty
(207 BCE–220 CE)
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Proterius Of Alexandria
Alexandria
Alexandria
(/ˌælɪɡˈzændriə/ or /-ˈzɑːnd-/;[3] Arabic: الإسكندرية al-ʾIskandariyya; Egyptian Arabic: إسكندرية Eskendria; Coptic: Ⲁⲗⲉⲝⲁⲛⲇⲣⲓⲁ, Ⲣⲁⲕⲟⲧⲉ Alexandria, Rakotə) is the second-largest city in Egypt
Egypt
and a major economic centre, extending about 32 km (20 mi) along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
in the north central part of the country. Its low elevation on the Nile delta
Nile delta
makes it highly vulnerable to rising sea levels. Alexandria
Alexandria
is an important industrial center because of its natural gas and oil pipelines from Suez. Alexandria
Alexandria
is also a popular tourist destination. Alexandria
Alexandria
was founded around a small, ancient Egyptian town c. 331 BC by Alexander the Great
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Council Of Chalcedon
The Council of Chalcedon
Chalcedon
(/kælˈsiːdən, ˈkælsɪdɒn/)[1] was a church council held from October 8 to November 1, AD 451, at Chalcedon. The council is numbered as the fourth ecumenical council by the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and most Protestants
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