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Akhenaten
Akhetaten, Gempaaten, Hwt-BenbenReligion Ancient Egyptian religion Atenism Akhenaten
Akhenaten
(/ˌækəˈnɑːtən/;[1] also spelled Echnaton,[7] Akhenaton,[8] Ikhnaton,[9] and Khuenaten;[10][11] meaning "Effective for Aten"), known before the fifth year of his reign as Amenhotep IV (sometimes given its Greek form, Amenophis IV, and meaning " Amun
Amun
Is Satisfied"), was an ancient Egyptian pharaoh of the 18th Dynasty
18th Dynasty
who ruled for 17 years and died perhaps in 1336 BC or 1334 BC. He is noted for abandoning traditional Egyptian polytheism and introducing worship centered on the Aten, which is sometimes described as monolatristic, henotheistic, or even quasi-monotheistic
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Hellenization
Hellenization
Hellenization
or Hellenisation is the historical spread of ancient Greek culture, religion and, to a lesser extent, language, over foreign peoples conquered by Greeks or brought into their sphere of influence, particularly during the Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
following the campaigns of Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
in the fourth century BC. The result of Hellenization
Hellenization
was that elements of Greek origin combined in various forms and degrees with local elements; these Greek influences spread from the Mediterranean basin
Mediterranean basin
as far east as modern-day Pakistan
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British Museum
5,906,716 (2017)[2]Ranked 1st nationallyChairman Sir Richard LambertDirector Hartwig FischerPublic transit access Goodge Street; Holborn; Tottenham Court Road; Russell Square;Website britishmuseum.orgArea 807,000 sq ft (75,000 m2) in 94 GalleriesThe centre of the museum was redeveloped in 2001 to become the Great Court, surrounding the original Reading Room.The British Museum, located in the Bloomsbury
Bloomsbury
area of London, United Kingdom, is a public institution dedicated to human history, art and culture
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Alan Gardiner
Sir Alan Henderson Gardiner (29 March 1879, in Eltham  – 19 December 1963, in Oxford) was an English Egyptologist, linguist, philologist, and independent scholar. He is regarded as one of the premier Egyptologists of the early and mid-20th century
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Egyptologists
This is a partial list of Egyptologists. An Egyptologist is any archaeologist, historian, linguist, or art historian who specializes in Egyptology, the scientific study of Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egypt
and its antiquities. Demotists are Egyptologists who specialize in the study of the Demotic language and field of Demotic Studies. Although a practitioner of the disciplined study of Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egypt
and Egyptian antiquities is an "Egyptologist", the field of Egyptology
Egyptology
is not exclusive to such practitioners.ContentsA B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y ZA[edit]Jan Assmann Barbara G
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DNA Analysis
Deoxyribonucleic acid (/diˈɒksiˌraɪboʊnjʊˈkliːɪk, -ˈkleɪ.ɪk/ ( listen);[1] DNA) is a thread-like chain of nucleotides carrying the genetic instructions used in the growth, development, functioning and reproduction of all known living organisms and many viruses. DNA
DNA
and ribonucleic acid (RNA) are nucleic acids; alongside proteins, lipids and complex carbohydrates (polysaccharides), they are one of the four major types of macromolecules that are essential for all known forms of life. Most DNA
DNA
molecules consist of two biopolymer strands coiled around each other to form a double helix. The two DNA
DNA
strands are called polynucleotides since they are composed of simpler monomer units called nucleotides.[2][3] Each nucleotide is composed of one of four nitrogen-containing nucleobases (cytosine [C], guanine [G], adenine [A] or thymine [T]), a sugar called deoxyribose, and a phosphate group
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Edward R. Ayrton
Edward Russell Ayrton (17 December 1882 – 18 May 1914) was an English Egyptologist
Egyptologist
and archaeologist.Edward Russell Ayrton.He was the son of William Scrope Ayrton, 1849-1904 (a British consular official in China) and his wife Ellen Louisa McClatchie, and was born in Wuhu, China, on 17 December 1882 (coincidentally, the same year as the formation of the Egypt
Egypt
Exploration Fund). He was educated at St Paul's School, in London. He began his career in Egyptology at the age of 20, assisting the pioneer of systematic methodology in archaeology William Matthew Flinders Petrie. He joined Petrie on the Egypt
Egypt
Exploration Fund excavations at Abydos (which began in 1899) from 1902 to 1904. Ayrton's first independent work was the excavation of the Second Dynasty site of Shunet ez Zebib
Shunet ez Zebib
(at Abydos)
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Flinders Petrie
Sir William Matthew Flinders
Matthew Flinders
Petrie, FRS, FBA (3 June 1853 – 28 July 1942), commonly known as Flinders Petrie, was an English Egyptologist and a pioneer of systematic methodology in archaeology and preservation of artifacts
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Ancient Egyptian Royal Titulary
The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt
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Henotheistic
Henotheism (from Greek ἑνός θεός (henos theos), meaning 'one god') is the worship of a single god while not denying the existence or possible existence of other deities.[1][2] Friedrich Schelling (1775–1854) coined the word, and Friedrich Welcker
Friedrich Welcker
(1784–1868) used it to depict primitive monotheism among ancient Greeks.[3]
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Polytheism
Polytheism
Polytheism
(from Greek πολυθεϊσμός, polytheismos) is the worship of or belief in multiple deities, which are usually assembled into a pantheon of gods and goddesses, along with their own religions and rituals. In most religions which accept polytheism, the different gods and goddesses are representations of forces of nature or ancestral principles, and can be viewed either as autonomous or as aspects or emanations of a creator deity or transcendental absolute principle (monistic theologies), which manifests immanently in nature (panentheistic and pantheistic theologies).[1] Most of the polytheistic deities of ancient religions, with the notable exceptions of the Ancient Egyptian[2] and Hindu deities, were conceived as having physical bodies. Polytheism
Polytheism
is a type of theism
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Akhaten
"The Rings of Akhaten" is the seventh episode of the seventh series of the British science-fiction drama Doctor Who, first broadcast on BBC One on 6 April 2013. It was written by Neil Cross and directed by Farren Blackburn. In the episode, alien time traveller the Doctor (Matt Smith) takes his new companion Clara Oswald
Clara Oswald
(Jenna-Louise Coleman) to the Rings of Akhaten, where several planets revolve around a larger one. They attend a religious festival where the young Queen of Years, Merry Gejelh (Emilia Jones), is about to be sacrificed. Determined to save Merry, the Doctor and Clara come face-to-face with the parasite of Akhaten, who requires memories, stories, and items of sentimental value. Cross was asked to write the episode after the success of scripting and shooting "Hide", a later episode
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Peter Dorman
Peter FitzGerald Dorman (born 1948) is an epigrapher, philologist, and Egyptologist. Recently a professor of history and archaeology at the American University of Beirut
American University of Beirut
(AUB), he served as the 15th President of the university from 2008 to 2015.[1] He spent most of his career as a professor and chair in the department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations (NELC) of the University of Chicago, and was director of Chicago House
Chicago House
in Luxor, the Epigraphic Survey field project of the Oriental Institute. He is presently a professor emeritus of the University of Chicago. Life and work[edit] Dorman is a leader in the study of the ancient Near East, known for his work as a historiographer, epigrapher and philologist
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Neues Museum
The Neues Museum
Neues Museum
("New Museum") is a museum in Berlin, Germany, located to the north of the Altes Museum
Altes Museum
(Old Museum) on Museum Island. It was built between 1843 and 1855 according to plans by Friedrich August Stüler, a student of Karl Friedrich Schinkel. The museum was closed at the beginning of World War II
World War II
in 1939,[1] and was heavily damaged during the bombing of Berlin. The rebuilding was overseen by the English architect David Chipperfield. The museum officially reopened in October 2009[2] and received a 2010 RIBA European Award[3] and the 2011 European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture. Exhibits include the Egyptian and Prehistory and Early History collections, as it did before the war
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Thebes, Egypt
Thebes (Ancient Greek: Θῆβαι, Thēbai), known to the ancient Egyptians as Waset, was an ancient Egyptian city located east of the Nile
Nile
about 800 kilometers (500 mi) south of the Mediterranean. Its ruins lie within the modern Egyptian city of Luxor. Thebes was the main city of the fourth Upper Egyptian nome (Sceptre nome) and was the capital of Egypt
Egypt
mainly during the Middle Kingdom and the New Kingdom. It was close to Nubia
Nubia
and the Eastern Desert, with its valuable mineral resources and trade routes. It was a cult center and the most venerated city of ancient Egypt
Egypt
during its heyday
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Egyptian Chronology
The majority of Egyptologists agree on the outline and many details of the chronology of Ancient Egypt
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