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Ailbe Of Emly
Saint Ailbe (Irish pronunciation: [ˈalʲvʲə]; Latin: Albeus), usually known in English as St Elvis, (British/Welsh) Eilfyw or Eilfw,[4] was regarded as the chief 'pre-Patrician' saint of Ireland (although his death was recorded in the early 6th-century). He was a bishop, confessor and later saint.[5][6] Little that can be regarded as reliable is known about Ailbe: in Irish sources from the 8th century he is regarded as the first bishop, and later patron saint of Emly
Emly
in Munster. Later Welsh sources (from the 11th c.) associate him with Saint David
Saint David
whom he was credited with baptizing and very late sources (16th c.) even give him a local Welsh genealogy making him an Ancient Briton. Saint Ailbe is venerated as one of the four great patrons of Ireland. His feast day is 12 September
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Ailbhe (other)
Ailbhe is an Irish name. It was originally a male name, and was frequently anglicized as Albert (a name to which it is etymologically unrelated), but is now more commonly a female name
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Aengus Of Munster
Óengus mac Nad Froích
Óengus mac Nad Froích
(430-489)[1] was an Eoganachta
Eoganachta
and the first Christian king of Munster. He was the son of Nad Froich mac Cuirc by Faochan, a British lady (called daughter of the King of Britain).[2] In Geoffrey Keating's History of Ireland Oengus is given a reign of 36 years which would place the start of his reign as early as 453.Contents1 Biography 2 Issue 3 See also 4 References4.1 Notes 4.2 Bibliography5 External linksBiography[edit] He was baptized a Christian in the royal seat of Cashel by Saint Patrick himself and imposed a baptismal tax on the Christian converts of Munster
Munster
for St. Patrick. It is mentioned that half of his numerous progeny were given into the church. St Patrick baptized him in blood by driving his crozier through the king's foot
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Éoganacht
The Eóganachta
Eóganachta
or Eoghanachta were an Irish dynasty centred on Cashel which dominated southern Ireland
Ireland
(namely the Kingdom of Munster) from the 6/7th to the 10th centuries,[1] and following that, in a restricted form, the Kingdom of Desmond, and its offshoot Carbery, to the late 16th century. By tradition the dynasty was founded by Conall Corc but named after his ancestor Éogan, the firstborn son of the semi-mythological 3rd-century king Ailill Aulom
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Abbán
Abbán
Abbán
moccu Corbmaic (Latin: Abbanus; d. 520? AD), also Eibbán or Moabba, is a saint in Irish tradition. He was associated, first and foremost, with Mag Arnaide (Moyarney or Adamstown, near New Ross, Co. Wexford) and with Cell Abbáin (Killabban, County Laois).[3] His cult was, however, also connected to other churches elsewhere in Ireland, notably that of his alleged sister Gobnait.Contents1 Sources 2 Background and life 3 Foundations 4 Abingdon and Irish-Norman relations 5 Commemoration 6 See also 7 Notes7.1 Primary sources 7.2 Secondary sources8 Further readingSources[edit] Three recensions of the saint's Life survive, two in Latin and one in Irish. The Latin versions are found in the Codex Dublinensis and the Codex Salmanticensis, while the Irish version is preserved incomplete in two manuscripts: the Mícheál Ó Cléirigh's manuscript Brussels, Royal Library MS 2324-40, fos
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Martyrology Of Tallaght
The Martyrology of Tallaght, which is closely related to the Félire Oengusso or Martyrology of Óengus the Culdee, is an eighth- or ninth-century martyrology, a list of saints and their feast days assembled by Máel Ruain and/or Óengus the Culdee at Tallaght Monastery, near Dublin.[1] The Martyrology of Tallaght is in prose and contains two sections for each day of the year, one general and one for Irish saints
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Vita Tripartita Sancti Patricii
The Vita tripartita Sancti Patricii (English: The Tripartite Life of Saint Patrick) is a bilingual Life of Patrick, written partly in Irish and in parts in Latin
Latin
from the late 9th century. The author's name is sometimes given as Saint MacEvin.[1] It is the earliest example of a saint's Life written in the Irish language
Irish language
and it was meant to be read in three parts over the three days of the saint's festival. Editions and translations[edit]Mulchrone, Kathleen, ed. and tr. (1939). Bethu Phátraic. The Tripartite Life of Patrick. 1. Dublin. CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)University of Frankfurt: in four parts ([1], [2], [3], [4])Stokes, Whitley, ed. and tr. (1887). The Tripartite Life of Patrick: With Other Documents Relating to that Saint. London. CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)References[edit]^ O'Leary, James (1874)
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Pope Hilary
Pope
Pope
Hilarius (died 29 February 468) was Pope
Pope
from 19 November 461 to his death in 468. Biography[edit] Hilarius was born in Sardinia.[3] As archdeacon under Pope
Pope
Leo I, he fought vigorously for the rights of the Roman See. In 449, he and Julius, Bishop of Puteoli, served as legates to the Second Council of Ephesus and vigorously opposed the condemnation of Flavian of Constantinople, by which he incurred the displeasure of Dioscurus of Alexandria, who presided over the synod
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List Of Popes
This chronological list of popes corresponds to that given in the Annuario Pontificio
Annuario Pontificio
under the heading "I Sommi Pontefici Romani" (The Supreme Pontiffs of Rome), excluding those that are explicitly indicated as antipopes. Published every year by the Roman Curia, the Annuario Pontificio
Annuario Pontificio
attaches no consecutive numbers to the popes, stating that it is impossible to decide which side represented at various times the legitimate succession, in particular regarding Pope Leo VIII, Pope
Pope
Benedict V and some mid-11th-century popes.[1] The 2001 edition of the Annuario Pontificio
Annuario Pontificio
introduced "almost 200 corrections to its existing biographies of the popes, from St Peter to John Paul II"
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Monastery
A monastery is a building or complex of buildings comprising the domestic quarters and workplaces of monastics, monks or nuns, whether living in communities or alone (hermits). A monastery generally includes a place reserved for prayer which may be a chapel, church, or temple, and may also serve as an oratory. Monasteries vary greatly in size, comprising a small dwelling accommodating only a hermit, or in the case of communities anything from a single building housing only one senior and two or three junior monks or nuns, to vast complexes and estates housing tens or hundreds. A monastery complex typically comprises a number of buildings which include a church, dormitory, cloister, refectory, library, balneary and infirmary. Depending on the location, the monastic order and the occupation of its inhabitants, the complex may also include a wide range of buildings that facilitate self-sufficiency and service to the community
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Irish Language
The Irish language
Irish language
(Gaeilge), also referred to as the Gaelic or the Irish Gaelic language,[5] is a Goidelic
Goidelic
language (Gaelic) of the Indo-European language family originating in Ireland
Ireland
and historically spoken by the Irish people. Irish is spoken as a first language by a small minority of Irish people, and as a second language by a larger group of non-native speakers. Irish has been the predominant language of the Irish people
Irish people
for most of their recorded history, and they have brought it with them to other regions, notably Scotland
Scotland
and the Isle of Man, where Middle Irish gave rise to Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
and Manx respectively
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Enda Of Aran
Saint
Saint
Enda of Aran
Enda of Aran
(Éanna, Éinne or Endeus, died c. 530) is an Irish saint in the Roman Catholic Church. His feast day is 21 March. Enda was a warrior-king of Oriel in Ulster, converted by his sister, Saint
Saint
Fanchea, an abbess. About 484 he established the first Irish monastery at Killeaney on Aran Mor. St Enda is described as the "patriarch of Irish monasticism". Most of the great Irish saints had some connection with Aran.Contents1 Early life and conversion 2 The Monastic School of Aran2.1 Enda and St Brecan 2.2 Enda and Corban3 Influence on early Gaelic Church 4 St Enda's well4.1 Barna, Co. Galway 4.2 Inis Oirr5 Saint
Saint
Brendan's stone 6 Legacy 7 See also 8 ReferencesEarly life and conversion[edit] According to the Martyrdom of Oengus, Enda was an Irish prince, son of Conall Derg of Oriel (Ergall) in Ulster
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Codex Salmanticensis
The Codex Salmanticensis (Brussels, Royal Library 7672–4) is a medieval Irish manuscript containing an extensive collection of Irish saints' Lives, now in the Royal Library of Belgium
Royal Library of Belgium
in Brussels. It was culled by the compilers from various sources, some of which can be identified as distinct, regionally focused groups in the text. One such group is that of the O'Donohue Lives, so called after one of the manuscript's contributors, Diarmaid Ó Dúnchadha. These works are mostly eighth- and ninth-century Lives of saints whose monasteries lay in central Ireland (around Slieve Bloom), in parts of Munster, Mide and Leinster
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Wales
Wales
Wales
(/ˈweɪlz/ ( listen); Welsh: Cymru [ˈkəmri] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the island of Great Britain.[8] It is bordered by England
England
to the east, the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel
Bristol Channel
to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous, with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon
Snowdon
(Yr Wyddfa), its highest summit
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Fosterage
Fosterage, the practice of a family bringing up a child not their own, differs from adoption in that the child's parents, not the foster-parents, remain the acknowledged parents. In many modern western societies foster care can be organised by the state to care for children with troubled family backgrounds, usually on a temporary basis
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Bishop Of St David's
The Bishop of St David's
St David's
is the ordinary of the Church in Wales Diocese of St David's. The succession of bishops stretches back to Saint David
Saint David
who in the 6th century established his seat in what is today the city of St David's in Pembrokeshire, founding St David's
St David's
Cathedral
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