HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Ahnenerbe
Ahnenerbe
Ahnenerbe
(German: [ˈʔaːnənˌʔɛʁbə], ancestral heritage) was a project in Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
to research the archaeological and cultural history of the Aryan
Aryan
race. Founded on July 1, 1935, as the Study Society for Primordial Intellectual history, German Ancestral Heritage (Studiengesellschaft für Geistesurgeschichte‚ Deutsches Ahnenerbe), by Heinrich Himmler, Herman Wirth, and Richard Walther Darré, the Ahnenerbe
Ahnenerbe
group later conducted experiments and launched expeditions in an attempt to prove that mythological Nordic populations had once ruled the world. Originally, the official mission of Ahnenerbe
Ahnenerbe
was to find new evidence of the racial heritage of the Germanic people; however, due to Himmler's obsession with occultism it quickly became his own occult tool and started using pseudoscience
[...More...]

picture info

Finland
Finland
Finland
(/ˈfɪnlənd/ ( listen); Finnish: Suomi [suo̯mi] ( listen); Swedish: Finland
Finland
[ˈfɪnland]), officially the Republic
Republic
of Finland
Finland
(Finnish: Suomen tasavalta, Swedish: Republiken Finland)[7] is a sovereign state in Northern Europe. The country has land borders with Sweden
Sweden
to the northwest, Norway
Norway
to the north, and Russia
Russia
to the east. To the south is the Gulf of Finland
Finland
with Estonia
Estonia
on the opposite side
[...More...]

picture info

Alfred Rosenberg
Alfred Ernst Rosenberg (12 January [O.S. 31 December 1892] 1893 – 16 October 1946) was the head of the Reich Ministry for the Occupied Eastern Territories
Reich Ministry for the Occupied Eastern Territories
and war criminal during the Nazi era. A Baltic German,[1] he was a theorist and an influential ideologue of the Nazi Party. Rosenberg was first introduced to Adolf Hitler
Adolf Hitler
by Dietrich Eckart
Dietrich Eckart
and held several important posts in the Nazi government. The author of a seminal work of Nazi ideology, The Myth of the Twentieth Century (1930), Rosenberg is considered one of the main authors of key National Socialist ideological creeds, including its racial theory, persecution of the Jews, Lebensraum, abrogation of the Treaty of Versailles, and opposition to what was considered "degenerate" modern art
[...More...]

picture info

Böttcherstrasse
Böttcherstraße
Böttcherstraße
is a street in the historic centre of Bremen, Germany. Only about 100 m (330 ft) long, it is famous for its unusual architecture and ranks among the city's main cultural landmarks and visitor attractions. Most of its buildings were erected between 1922 and 1931, primarily as a result of the initiative of Ludwig Roselius, a Bremen-based coffee-trader, who charged Bernhard Hoetger with the artistic supervision over the project. The street and its buildings are a rare example of an architectural ensemble belonging to a variant of the expressionist style. Several of the houses can be classed as Brick
Brick
Expressionism
[...More...]

picture info

Führerprinzip
The Führerprinzip
Führerprinzip
[ˈfyːʀɐpʀɪnˌtsiːp] ( listen) (German for "leader principle") prescribed the fundamental basis of political authority in the governmental structures of the Third Reich. This principle can be most succinctly understood to mean that "the Führer's word is above all written law" and that governmental policies, decisions, and offices ought to work toward the realization of this end.[1] In actual political usage, it refers mainly to the practice of dictatorship within the ranks of a political party itself, and as such, it has become an earmark of political Fascism.Contents1 Ideology 2 Propaganda 3 Application 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksIdeology[edit] The Führerprinzip
Führerprinzip
was not invented by the Nazis. Hermann von Keyserling, an ethnically German philosopher from Estonia, was the first to use the term
[...More...]

Glossary Of The Weimar Republic
These are terms, concepts and ideas that are useful to understanding the political situation in the Weimar Republic. Some are particular to the period and government, while others were just in common usage but have a bearing on the Weimar milieu and political maneuvering.Agrarian Bolshevism — an idea by several political parties, involving the expropriation of large estates (mostly those of junkers in Prussia) and passing them out to peasants. Angestellte — White-collar employees Barmat scandal
Barmat scandal
— brothers Julius, Herschel, Solomon and Isaak, who owned a huge conglomerate of businesses and overextended themselves. Their bankruptcy involved millions of dollars and they bribed politicians on all levels of the Social Democratic party
[...More...]

picture info

German Reichsmark
The Reichsmark
Reichsmark
(German: [ˈʁaɪçsˌmaʁk] ( listen); sign: ℛℳ) was the currency in Germany
Germany
from 1924 until 20 June 1948 in West Germany, where it was replaced with the Deutsche Mark, and until 23 June in East Germany
Germany
when it was replaced by the East German mark. The Reichsmark
Reichsmark
was subdivided into 100 Reichspfennig
[...More...]

picture info

Steglitz-Zehlendorf
Steglitz-Zehlendorf
Steglitz-Zehlendorf
is the sixth borough of Berlin, formed in Berlin's 2001 administrative reform by merging the former boroughs of Steglitz and Zehlendorf.Contents1 Demographics 2 Subdivision 3 Politics 4 Landmarks 5 Gallery 6 Education 7 Twin towns 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksDemographics[edit] As of 2010, the borough had a population of roughly 294,000, of whom about 70,000 (~24%) were of non-German ethnicity/origin
[...More...]

Eingetragener Verein
Verein is a German word, sometimes translated as union, club or association, and may refer to: Eingetragener Verein (e
[...More...]

picture info

Haithabu
Hedeby
Hedeby
(Danish pronunciation: [ˈheːð̩byːˀ], Old Norse Heiðabýr, German Haithabu) was an important Viking Age
Viking Age
(8th to the 11th centuries) trading settlement near the southern end of the Jutland Peninsula, now in the Schleswig-Flensburg
Schleswig-Flensburg
district of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
[...More...]

picture info

Berlin
Berlin
Berlin
(/bɜːrˈlɪn/, German: [bɛɐ̯ˈliːn] ( listen)) is the capital and the largest city of Germany, as well as one of its 16 constituent states. With a steadily growing population of approximately 3.7 million,[4] Berlin
Berlin
is the second most populous city proper in the European Union
European Union
behind London
London
and the seventh most populous urban area in the European Union.[5] Located in northeastern Germany
Germany
on the banks of the rivers Spree
Spree
and Havel, it is the centre of the Berlin- Brandenburg
Brandenburg
Metropolitan Region, which has roughly 6 million residents from more than 180 nations.[6][7][8][9] Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin
Berlin
is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate
[...More...]

picture info

Musicology
Musicology
Musicology
(from Greek μουσική (mousikē), meaning 'music', and -λογία (-logia), meaning 'study of') is the scholarly analysis and research-based study of music. Musicology
Musicology
is part of the humanities. A scholar who participates in musical research is a musicologist.[1][2][3] Traditionally, historical musicology (commonly termed "music history") has been the most prominent sub-discipline of musicology. In the 2010s, historical musicology is one of several large musicology sub-disciplines. Historical musicology, ethnomusicology, and systematic musicology are approximately equal in size.[4] Ethnomusicology
Ethnomusicology
is the study of music in its cultural context. Systematic musicology includes music acoustics, the science and technology of acoustical musical instruments, and the musical implications of physiology, psychology, sociology, philosophy and computing
[...More...]

picture info

Lur
A lur, also lure or lurr, is a long natural blowing horn without finger holes that is played by embouchure. Lurs
Lurs
can be straight or curved in various shapes. The purpose of the curves was to make long instruments easier to carry (e.g. for marching, like the modern sousaphone) and to prevent directing the loud noise at nearby people. The name lur is particularly given to two distinct types of ancient wind instruments. The more recent type is made of wood and was in use in Scandinavia
Scandinavia
during the Middle Ages. The older type, named after the more recent type, is made of bronze, dates to the Bronze
Bronze
Age and was often found in pairs, deposited in bogs, mainly in Denmark
Denmark
and Germany. It consists of a mouthpiece and several pieces and/or pipes. Its length can reach between 1.5 meters and 2 meters
[...More...]

picture info

Tonality
Tonality
Tonality
is the arrangement of pitches and/or chords of a musical work in a hierarchy of perceived relations, stabilities, attractions and directionality. In this hierarchy, the individual pitch or triadic chord with the greatest stability is called the tonic. The root of the tonic chord forms the name given to the key; so in the key of C major, the note C is both the tonic of the scale and the root of the tonic chord (C–E–G). Simple folk music songs often start and end with the tonic note
[...More...]

picture info

Atonalism
Atonality
Atonality
in its broadest sense is music that lacks a tonal center, or key. Atonality, in this sense, usually describes compositions written from about 1908 to the present day where a hierarchy of pitches focusing on a single, central tone is not used, and the notes of the chromatic scale function independently of one another (Kennedy 1994). More narrowly, the term atonality describes music that does not conform to the system of tonal hierarchies that characterized classical European music between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries (Lansky, Perle, and Headlam 2001)
[...More...]

picture info

Kalevala
The Kalevala
Kalevala
(Finnish Kalevala
Kalevala
IPA: [ˈkɑle̞ʋɑlɑ]) is a 19th-century work of epic poetry compiled by Elias Lönnrot
Elias Lönnrot
from Karelian and Finnish oral folklore and mythology.[1] It is regarded as the national epic of Karelia
Karelia
and Finland[Note 1] and is one of the most significant works of Finnish literature. The Kalevala
Kalevala
was instrumental in the development of the Finnish national identity, the intensification of Finland's language strife
Finland's language strife
and the growing sense of nationality that ultimately led to Finland's independence from Russia in 1917.[3][4] The first version of The Kalevala
Kalevala
(called The Old Kalevala) was published in 1835
[...More...]