HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Agony In The Garden
The Agony in the Garden
Agony in the Garden
of Gethsemane
Gethsemane
refers to the events in the life of Jesus
Jesus
as recorded in the New Testament, between the Farewell Discourse at the conclusion of the Last Supper
Last Supper
and Jesus' arrest.[1]Contents1 Scriptural depiction 2 Tradition 3 Holy Hour 4 Artistic depictions 5 Medical conjectures 6 See also 7 ReferencesScriptural depiction[edit] Agony in the Garden
Agony in the Garden
by El GrecoSee also: Luke 22:43–44 According to all four Gospels, immediately after the Last Supper, Jesus
Jesus
took a walk to pray. Each Gospel offers a slightly different account regarding narrative details. The gospels of Matthew and Mark identify this place of prayer as Gethsemane
[...More...]

"Agony In The Garden" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Michelangelo Merisi Da Caravaggio
Michelangelo
Michelangelo
Merisi (Michele Angelo Merigi or Amerighi) da Caravaggio (/ˌkærəˈvædʒioʊ/, US: /-ˈvɑːdʒ-/; Italian pronunciation: [mikeˈlandʒelo meˈriːzi da (k)karaˈvaddʒo]; 28 September 1571[2] – 18 July 1610) was an Italian painter active in Rome, Naples, Malta, and Sicily
Sicily
from the early 1590s to 1610. His paintings combine a realistic observation of the human state, both physical and emotional, with a dramatic use of lighting, and they had a formative influence on Baroque
Baroque
painting.[3][4][5] Caravaggio
Caravaggio
employed close physical observation with a dramatic use of chiaroscuro that came to be known as tenebrism. He made the technique a dominant stylistic element, darkening shadows and transfixing subjects in bright shafts of light
[...More...]

"Michelangelo Merisi Da Caravaggio" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Acts Of Reparation To The Virgin Mary
Catholic tradition and Mariology
Mariology
include specific prayers and devotions as acts of reparation for insults and blasphemies against the Blessed Virgin Mary
[...More...]

"Acts Of Reparation To The Virgin Mary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stations Of The Cross
The Stations of the Cross
Stations of the Cross
or the Way of the Cross, also known as the Way of Sorrows or the Via Crucis, refers to a series of images depicting Jesus
Jesus
Christ on the day of his crucifixion and accompanying prayers. The stations grew out of imitations of Via Dolorosa
Via Dolorosa
in Jerusalem
Jerusalem
which is believed to be the actual path Jesus
Jesus
walked to Mount Calvary. The object of the stations is to help the Christians faithful to make a spiritual pilgrimage through contemplation of the Passion of Christ
[...More...]

"Stations Of The Cross" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Heinrich Hofmann (painter)
Johann Michael Ferdinand Heinrich Hofmann (March 19, 1824 - June 23, 1911) was a German painter of the late 19th to early 20th century. He was the uncle of the German painter Ludwig von Hofmann. He was born in Darmstadt and died in Dresden. He is best known for his many paintings depicting the life of Jesus Christ.Contents1 Life 2 Body of works 3 Selected works 4 Bibliographical references 5 See also 6 External linksLife[edit] Heinrich Hofmann grew up in a family that harbored a deep interest in art. His father, advocate Heinrich Karl Hofmann (1795–1845) painted in watercolors, his mother Sophie Hofmann, née Volhard (1798–1854) gave lessons in art before she married, and his four brothers all showed artistic talent. Heinrich, however, was the only one for whom art was not only a profession but the center of his life. Hofmann received his first lessons in art from the copper engraver Ernst Rauch in Darmstadt
[...More...]

"Heinrich Hofmann (painter)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Acts Of Reparation
Reparation is a theological concept closely connected with those of atonement and satisfaction. In ascetical theology, reparation is the making of amends for insults given to God through sin, either one's own or another's. The response of man is to be reparation through adoration, prayer, and sacrifice. In Roman Catholic tradition, an act of reparation is a prayer or devotion with the intent to expiate the "sins of others", e.g
[...More...]

"Acts Of Reparation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Acts Of Reparation To Jesus Christ
Catholic tradition includes specific prayers and devotions as Acts of Reparation for insults and blasphemies against Jesus Christ and the Holy Name of Jesus. These include the sufferings during the Passion of Jesus. Similar prayers as Acts of Reparation to the Virgin Mary and Acts of Reparation to The Holy Trinity also exist. These prayers are recited with the intent to repair the sins of others, e.g. when the name of Jesus Christ is taken in vain, for the repair of the sin of blasphemy or the insults against and sufferings of Jesus in Calvary. Pope John Paul II referred to reparation as the "unceasing effort to stand beside the endless crosses on which the Son of God continues to be crucified".[1] Specific Roman Catholic organizations with this purpose exist. For instance, the Archconfraternity of Reparation for blasphemy and the neglect of Sunday was founded by Msgr
[...More...]

"Acts Of Reparation To Jesus Christ" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Raccolta
The Raccolta
Raccolta
(literally, "collection" in Italian) is a book, published from 1807 to 1950, that listed Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
prayers and other acts of piety, such as novenas, for which specific indulgences were granted by Popes. In 1968 it was replaced by the Enchiridion Indulgentiarum,[1][2] listing fewer specific prayers but including new general grants that apply to a wide range of prayerful actions. The text was in Italian, with the prayers themselves given in Latin.Contents1 Name 2 History 3 Successor 4 See also 5 Notes 6 External linksName[edit] The Raccolta
Raccolta
is an abbreviation of its full title: Raccolta
Raccolta
delle orazioni e pie opere per le quali sono sono concedute dai Sommi Pontefici le SS
[...More...]

"Raccolta" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Holy See
The Holy See
Holy See
(Italian: Santa Sede; Latin: Sancta Sedes; Ecclesiastical Latin: [ˈsaŋkta ˈsedes]), also referred to as the See of Rome, is the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in Rome, the episcopal see of the Pope, and an independent sovereign entity. It serves as the central point of reference for the Catholic Church everywhere and the focal point of communion due to its position as the pre-eminent episcopal see of the universal church. Today, it is responsible for the governance of all Catholics, organised in their Particular Churches, Patriarchates and religious institutes. As an independent sovereign entity, holding the Vatican City
Vatican City
enclave in Rome
Rome
as an independent state, it maintains diplomatic relations with other states
[...More...]

"Holy See" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Miserentissimus Redemptor
Miserentissimus Redemptor is the title of an encyclical by Pope Pius XI, issued on May 8, 1928 on reparation to the Sacred Heart.[1] This encyclical deals with the concepts of Acts of Reparation and atonement. Referencing Pope Leo XIII's encyclical, Annum sacrum, Pius stated, "For as in olden time when mankind came forth from Noe's ark, God set His "bow in the clouds" (Genesis ix, 13), shining as the sign of a friendly covenant; so in the most turbulent times of a more recent age, ..
[...More...]

"Miserentissimus Redemptor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Betrayal Of Judas
The Bargain of Judas is a biblical episode related to the life of Jesus which is recorded in all three Synoptic Gospels, Matthew 26:14–16, Mark 14:10–11 and Luke 22:1–6. It relates how Judas Iscariot made a bargain with the Jewish chief priests to betray Jesus.[1] The Gospel of Matthew specifies that Judas received thirty pieces of silver:Then one of the Twelve — the one called Judas Iscariot — went to the chief priests and asked, "What are you willing to give me if I hand him over to you?" So they counted out for him thirty silver coins. From then on Judas watched for an opportunity to hand him over.[2]The word which is translated "counted out" (Greek: εστησαν, estēsan) in modern translations like the Good News Translation and the New International Version appears as "they appointed unto him" in the Geneva Bible, "they covenanted with him" in the King James Version, "they weighed out" in the American Standard Version and as "they settled with him" in J. B
[...More...]

"Betrayal Of Judas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pope Pius XI
Pope
Pope
Pius XI, (Italian: Pio XI) born Ambrogio Damiano Achille Ratti[a] (Italian: [amˈbrɔ:dʒo daˈmja:no aˈkille ˈratti]; 31 May 1857 – 10 February 1939), was head of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
from 6 February 1922 to his death in 1939. He was the first sovereign of Vatican City
Vatican City
from its creation as an independent state on 11 February 1929. He took as his papal motto, "Pax Christi in Regno Christi," translated "The Peace of Christ in the Kingdom of Christ." Pius XI issued numerous encyclicals, including Quadragesimo anno on the 40th anniversary of Pope
Pope
Leo XIII's groundbreaking social encyclical Rerum novarum, highlighting the capitalistic greed of international finance, the dangers of socialism/communism, and social justice issues, and Quas primas, establishing the feast of Christ the King in response to anti-clericalism
[...More...]

"Pope Pius XI" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Visions Of Jesus And Mary
Since the Crucifixion of Jesus
Crucifixion of Jesus
Christ on Calvary, a number of people have claimed to have had visions of Jesus Christ
Jesus Christ
and personal conversations with him. Some people make similar claims regarding his mother, the Blessed Virgin Mary. Discussions about the authenticity of these visions have often invited controversy. The Catholic Church endorses a fraction of these claims, and various visionaries it accepts have achieved beatification, or even sainthood. The very first reported visions of Christ, and personal conversations with him, after his resurrection and prior to his ascension are found in the New Testament. One of the most widely recalled Resurrection appearances of Jesus is the doubting Thomas conversation (John 20:24-29) between him and Thomas the Apostle
Thomas the Apostle
after his death
[...More...]

"Visions Of Jesus And Mary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tate Britain
Tate
Tate
Britain (known from 1897 to 1932 as the National Gallery
National Gallery
of British Art and from 1932 to 2000 as the Tate
Tate
Gallery) is an art museum on Millbank
Millbank
in the City of Westminster
City of Westminster
in London. It is part of the Tate
Tate
network of galleries in England, with Tate
Tate
Modern, Tate Liverpool and Tate
Tate
St Ives. It is the oldest gallery in the network, having opened in 1897. It houses a substantial collection of the art of the United Kingdom since Tudor times, and in particular has large holdings of the works of J. M. W. Turner, who bequeathed all his own collection to the nation
[...More...]

"Tate Britain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Correggio
Antonio Allegri da Correggio (August 1489 – March 5, 1534), usually known as Correggio (Italian: [korˈreddʒo]), was the foremost painter of the Parma
Parma
school of the Italian Renaissance, who was responsible for some of the most vigorous and sensuous works of the 16th century. In his use of dynamic composition, illusionistic perspective and dramatic foreshortening, Correggio prefigured the Rococo
Rococo
art of the 18th century. He is considered a master of chiaroscuro.Contents1 Biography 2 Works in Parma 3 Mythological series based on Ovid's Metamorphoses 4 Evaluation 5 Selected works 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit]Nativity (c.1529–30)Antonio Allegri was born in Correggio, Italy, a small town near Reggio Emilia. His date of birth is uncertain (around 1489). His father was a merchant.[citation needed] Otherwise little is known about Correggio's early life or training
[...More...]

"Correggio" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Apsley House
Apsley House
Apsley House
is the London
London
townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner, on the south-east corner of Hyde Park, facing south towards the busy traffic roundabout in the centre of which stands the Wellington Arch. It is a Grade I listed building. It is sometimes[when?] referred to[by whom?] as the Wellington Museum. The house is now run by English Heritage
English Heritage
and is open to the public as a museum and art gallery, exhibiting the Wellington Collection, a large collection of paintings, other artworks and memorabilia of the career of the 1st Duke. The 9th Duke of Wellington retains the use of part of the buildings. It is perhaps the only preserved example of an English aristocratic town house from its period
[...More...]

"Apsley House" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.