HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Affirming The Consequent
Affirming the consequent, sometimes called converse error, fallacy of the converse or confusion of necessity and sufficiency, is a formal fallacy of inferring the converse from the original statement. The corresponding argument has the general form: P → Q , Q ∴ P displaystyle frac Pto Q,Q therefore P An argument of this form is invalid, i.e., the conclusion can be false even when statements 1 and 2 are true. Since P was never asserted as the only sufficient condition for Q, other factors could account for Q (while P was false).[1][2] To put it differently, if P implies Q, the only inference that can be made is non-Q implies non-P
[...More...]

"Affirming The Consequent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Shanghai Tower
The Shanghai Tower (Chinese: 上海中心大厦; pinyin: Shànghǎi Zhōngxīn Dàshà; Shanghainese: Zånhe Tsonshin Dasa; literally: "Shanghai Centre Tower") is a 632-metre (2,073 ft), 128-story megatall skyscraper in Lujiazui, Pudong, Shanghai.[9]. It also has the world's highest observation deck within a building or structure (Level 121, 561.25 m),[10] and the world's fastest elevators at a top speed of 20.5 metres per second (74 km/h; 46 mph).[11][12] It is the world's second-tallest building by height to architectural top. Designed by international design firm Gensler and owned by the Shanghai city government,[2] it is the tallest of the world's first triple-adjacent super-tall buildings in Pudong, the other two being the Jin Mao Tower and the Shanghai World Financial Centre
[...More...]

"Shanghai Tower" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eiffel Tower
The Eiffel Tower
Eiffel Tower
(/ˈaɪfəl/ EYE-fəl; French: tour Eiffel [tuʁ‿ɛfɛl] ( listen)) is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars
Champ de Mars
in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower. Constructed from 1887–89 as the entrance to the 1889 World's Fair, it was initially criticized by some of France's leading artists and intellectuals for its design, but it has become a global cultural icon of France
France
and one of the most recognisable structures in the world.[3] The Eiffel Tower
Eiffel Tower
is the most-visited paid monument in the world; 6.91 million people ascended it in 2015. The tower is 324 metres (1,063 ft) tall, about the same height as an 81-storey building, and the tallest structure in Paris. Its base is square, measuring 125 metres (410 ft) on each side
[...More...]

"Eiffel Tower" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Confusion Of The Inverse
Confusion of the inverse, also called the conditional probability fallacy or the inverse fallacy, is a logical fallacy whereupon a conditional probability is equivocated with its inverse:[1][2] That is, given two events A and B, the probability of A happening given that B has happened is assumed to be about the same as the probability of B given A. More formally, P(AB) is assumed to be approximately equal to P(BA).Contents1 Examples1.1 Example 1 1.2 Example 21.2.1 Calculations 1.2.2 Conclusion2 See also 3 Notes 4 ReferencesExamples[edit] Example 1[edit]Relative size Malignant Benign TotalTest positive 0.8 (true positive) 9.9 (false positive) 10.7Test negative 0.2 (false negative) 89.1 (true negative) 89.3Total 1 99 100In one study, physicians were asked to give the chances of malignancy with a 1% prior probability of occurring. A test can detect 80% of malignancies and has a 10% false positive rate
[...More...]

"Confusion Of The Inverse" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Appeal To Consequences
In law, an appeal is the process in which cases are reviewed, where parties request a formal change to an official decision. Appeals function both as a process for error correction as well as a process of clarifying and interpreting law.[1] Although appellate courts have existed for thousands of years, common law countries did not incorporate an affirmative right to appeal into their jurisprudence until the 19th century.[2]Contents1 History 2 Appellate procedure 3 Appellate courts 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] Appellate courts and other systems of error correction have existed for many millennia
[...More...]

"Appeal To Consequences" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Q.E.D.
Q.E.D.
Q.E.D.
(also written QED and QED) is an initialism of the Latin phrase quod erat demonstrandum meaning "what was to be demonstrated" or "what was to be shown."[1] Some may also use a less direct translation instead: "thus it has been demonstrated." Traditionally, the phrase is placed in its abbreviated form at the end of a mathematical proof or philosophical argument when the original proposition has been restated exactly, as the conclusion of the demonstration or completion of the proof.[2]Contents1 Etymology and early use 2 Modern philosophy 3 Difference from Q.E.F. 4 Equivalents in other languages 5 Typographical forms used symbolically 6 Modern humorous use 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEtymology and early use[edit] The phrase, quod erat demonstrandum, is a translation into Latin from the Greek ὅπερ ἔδει δεῖξαι (hoper edei deixai; abbreviated as ΟΕΔ)
[...More...]

"Q.E.D." on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Catch-22
Catch-22
Catch-22
is a satirical novel by American author Joseph Heller. He began writing it in 1953; the novel was first published in 1961. Often cited as one of the most significant novels of the twentieth century,[2] it uses a distinctive non-chronological third-person omniscient narration, describing events from the points of view of different characters. The separate storylines are out of sequence so the timeline develops along with the plot. The novel is set during World War II, from 1942 to 1944. It mainly follows the life of Captain John Yossarian, a U.S. Army Air Forces B-25
B-25
bombardier. Most of the events in the book occur while the fictional 256th Squadron is based on the island of Pianosa, in the Mediterranean Sea, west of Italy
[...More...]

"Catch-22" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Coping Mechanism
Coping is the conscious effort to reduce stress.[1][2][3][4][5] Psychological coping mechanisms are commonly termed coping strategies or coping skills. Coping skills develop from infancy and are learnt by watching others and trial and error
[...More...]

"Coping Mechanism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
Post hoc ergo propter hoc (Latin: "after this, therefore because of this") is a logical fallacy that states "Since event Y followed event X, event Y must have been caused by event X." It is often shortened simply to post hoc fallacy. A logical fallacy of the questionable cause variety, it is subtly different from the fallacy cum hoc ergo propter hoc ("with this, therefore because of this"), in which two events occur simultaneously or the chronological ordering is insignificant or unknown. Post hoc is a particularly tempting error because temporal sequence appears to suggest causality
[...More...]

"Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Heart Attack
Myocardial infarction
Myocardial infarction
(MI), commonly known as a heart attack, occurs when blood flow decreases or stops to a part of the heart, causing damage to the heart muscle.[1] The most common symptom is chest pain or discomfort which may travel into the shoulder, arm, back, neck, or jaw.[1] Often it occurs in the center or left side of the chest and lasts for more than a few minutes.[1] The discomfort may occasionally feel like heartburn.[1] Other symptoms may include shortness of breath, nausea, feeling faint, a cold sweat, or feeling tired.[1] About 30% of people have atypical symptoms.[7] Women more often have atypical symptoms than men.[10] Among t
[...More...]

"Heart Attack" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Contrapositive
In logic, contraposition is an inference that says that a conditional statement is logically equivalent to its contrapositive. The contrapositive of the statement has its antecedent and consequent inverted and flipped: the contrapositive of P → Q displaystyle Prightarrow Q is thus ¬ Q → ¬ P displaystyle neg Qrightarrow neg P . For instance, the proposition "All bats are mammals" can be restated as the conditional "If something is a bat, then it is a mammal"
[...More...]

"Contrapositive" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

ELIZA Effect
The ELIZA
ELIZA
effect, in computer science, is the tendency to unconsciously assume computer behaviors are analogous to human behaviors, that is anthropomorphisation.Contents1 Overview 2 Origin 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesOverview[edit] In its specific form, the ELIZA
ELIZA
effect refers only to "the susceptibility of people to read far more understanding than is warranted into strings of symbols — especially words — strung together by computers".[1] A trivial example of the specific form of the Eliza effect, given by Douglas Hofstadter, involves an automated teller machine which displays the words "THANK YOU" at the end of a transaction
[...More...]

"ELIZA Effect" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bill Gates
William Henry Gates III (born October 28, 1955) is an American business magnate, investor, author, philanthropist, humanitarian, and principal founder of the Microsoft
Microsoft
Corporation.[2][3] During his career at Microsoft, Gates held the positions of chairman, CEO and chief software architect, while also being the largest individual shareholder until May 2014. In 1975, Gates and
[...More...]

"Bill Gates" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Wealth
Wealth is the abundance of valuable resources or valuable material possessions. This includes the core meaning as held in the originating old English word weal, which is from an Indo-European word stem.[1] An individual, community, region or country that possesses an abundance of such possessions or resources to the benefit of the common good is known as wealthy. The modern concept of wealth is of significance in all areas of economics, and clearly so for growth economics and development economics yet the meaning of wealth is context-dependent. At the most general level, economists may define wealth as "anything of value" that captures both the subjective nature of the idea and the idea that it is not a fixed or static concept
[...More...]

"Wealth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States Bullion Depository
Coordinates: 37°53′00″N 85°57′55″W / 37.8832°N 85.96525°W / 37.8832; -85.96525US Bullion Depository, Fort Knox, KentuckyU.S. National Register of Historic PlacesThe United States Bullion DepositoryShow map of KentuckyShow map of the USLocation Gold
Gold
Vault Rd. and Bullion Blvd., Fort Knox, KentuckyArea 42 acres (17 ha)Built by Great Lakes Construction Co.Architect Louis A. SimonArchitectural style Classical RevivalNRHP reference # 88000056[1]Added to NRHP February 18, 1988The United States Bullion Depository, often known as Fort Knox, is a fortified vault building located within the United States Army
United States Army
post of Fort Knox, Kentucky. The vault is used to store a large portion of United States official gold reserves and occasionally other precious items belonging or entrusted to the federal government
[...More...]

"United States Bullion Depository" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.