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AeroVelo Atlas
The AeroVelo Atlas
AeroVelo Atlas
is a human-powered helicopter (HPH) that was built for AHS International's Igor I. Sikorsky Human Powered Helicopter Competition. On 13 June 2013, it became the first aircraft to achieve the goals of the competition and thus won the prize.Contents1 Design and development 2 Operational history 3 Specifications 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDesign and development[edit] AHS International
AHS International
announced AeroVelo as the winner of its Igor I. Sikorsky Human Powered Helicopter
Helicopter
Competition on 11 July 2013
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Safety Bicycle
A safety bicycle (or simply a safety) is a type of bicycle that became very popular beginning in the late 1880s as an alternative to the penny-farthing ("ordinary") and is now the most common type of bicycle. Early bicycles of this style were known as safety bicycles because they were noted for, and marketed as, being safer than the high wheelers they were replacing.[1] Even though modern bicycles use a similar design, the term is rarely used today and may be considered obsolete.[2]Contents1 Definition 2 History 3 Characteristics 4 Image gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDefinition[edit] The term safety bicycle was used in the 1880s for any alternative to the penny-farthing
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Hybrid Bicycle
Hybrid bicycles blend characteristics from more specialized road bikes, touring bikes and mountain bikes.[1] The resulting "hybrid" is a general-purpose bike that can tolerate a wide range of riding conditions and applications. Their stability, comfort and ease of use make them popular with novice cyclists, casual riders, commuters, and children. Hybrids typically borrow the flat, straight handlebars and upright seating posture of a mountain bike, which many bicyclists find comfortable and intuitive. Hybrids also employ the lighter weight, thinner wheels and smooth tires of road bikes, allowing for greater speed and less exertion when riding on the road. Hybrid bikes often have places to mount racks and bags for transporting belongings, much like a touring bike. Hybrid bikes have spawned numerous sub-categories satisfying diverse ridership
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Cycle Rickshaw
The cycle rickshaw is a small-scale local means of transport; it is also known by a variety of other names such as bike taxi, velotaxi, pedicab, bikecab, cyclo, beca, becak, trisikad, or trishaw. As opposed to rickshaws pulled by a person on foot, cycle rickshaws are human-powered by pedaling. Another type of rickshaw is the auto rickshaw. They are a type of tricycle designed to carry passengers on a for-hire basis
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Cyclo-cross Bicycle
A cyclo-cross bicycle is a bicycle specifically designed for the rigors of a cyclo-cross race.[1] Cyclo-cross
Cyclo-cross
bicycles roughly resemble the racing bicycles used in road racing. The major differences between the two are the frame geometry, and the wider clearances that cyclo-cross bikes have for their larger tires and mud and other debris that they accumulate.Contents1 Frame design 2 Components 3 Tires 4 Equipment choice 5 Rules 6 Non-racing use 7 Mountain bikes in Cyclocross Racing 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksFrame design[edit] Frame materials are selected with an aim to produce a lightweight, yet stiff and responsive frame. Low weight is prized for ease of carrying while running. A cyclo-cross racer may lift or carry his/her bike as many as 30 times in one 60 minute race, increasing the desire for a lightweight bicycle
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Downhill Bike
A downhill bike (also known as a downhill mountain bike) is a full suspension bicycle designed for downhill cycling on particularly steep, rocky trails. Unlike a typical mountain bike, durability and stability are the most important design features, compared to lighter, more versatile cross-country bikes. Downhill bikes are primarily intended for high speed descent, and downhill riders will usually push, or shuttle via chairlifts or motorized vehicles, to the trailhead.[1] Downhill bikes share similarities with freeride bikes due to their large strong frames and increased travel.[1]Contents1 Geometry 2 Components2.1 Suspension 2.2 Forks 2.3 Brakes 2.4 Drivetrain 2.5 Tires3 Materials 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksGeometry[edit] These bikes will also have very slack head tube angles (66 degrees or less),[2] long wheelbases (over 45 inches or 1,143 mm),[2] and will accommodate the use of up to 3-inch (76.2 mm) width knobbed tires
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Downhill Mountain Biking
Downhill mountain biking
Downhill mountain biking
(DH) is a genre of mountain biking practiced on steep, rough terrain that often features jumps, drops, rock gardens and other obstacles. Downhill bikes are heavier and stronger than other mountain bikes and feature front and rear suspension with over 8 inches (20 cm) of travel, to glide quickly over rocks and tree roots. In competitive races, a continuous course is defined on each side by a strip of tape. Depending on the format, riders have a single or double attempt to reach the finish line as fast as possible, while remaining between the two tapes designating the course. Riders must choose their line by compromising between the shortest possible line and the line that can be traveled at the highest speed
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Enduro (mountain Biking)
Enduro in its most basic definition is a type of mountain bike racing where the downhills are timed, and the uphills are not.[2][3][4] Riders are timed in stages that are primarily downhill, with neutral "transfer" stages in between. The transfer stages usually must be completed within a time-limit, but are not part of the accumulated time.Contents1 Background 2 Origins 3 Examples 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksBackground[edit] Enduro is a stage-race format where the winner is the rider who accumulates the lowest combined time from the timed downhill sections. Enduros typically take place over one or two days, however, week-long competitions also exist such as the Trans Provence (France),[5] the Andes Pacifico (Chile),[6] and the Pisgah Stage Race (United States).[3] A typical one-day enduro consists of 3 to 5 timed stages which take place on technically demanding, generally descending terrain, and often with sections of singletrack
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Fatbike
A fatbike (also called fat bike or fat-tire bike) is an off-road bicycle with oversized tires, typically 3.8 in (97 mm) or larger and rims 2.6 in (66 mm) or wider, designed for low ground pressure to allow riding on soft unstable terrain, such as snow, sand, bogs and mud.[1] Fatbikes are built around frames with wide forks and stays to accommodate the wide rims required to fit these tires. The wide tires can be used with inflation pressures as low as 340 hPa (5 psi) to allow for a smooth ride over rough obstacles
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Flat Bar Road Bike
A flat bar road bike, also called a fitness bike, is a hybrid bike optimized for road usage or a road bike with a flat handlebar in place of a drop bar.[1][2] Frame construction and geometry borrow significantly from conventional road design. The frame is constructed to a light or middleweight standard with a shape that promotes an aggressive, aerodynamic posture suited to riding at higher speeds. There is no conventional suspension for either wheel, though the front fork may use carbon or steel to quell vibration. Wheel size is almost universally 700c with a width of 28mm to 32mm, somewhat wider than the 23mm to 25mm road bike standard. The drivetrain of a flat bar bike often borrows features from multiple bike styles, pairing the trigger-shifting approach of mountain bikes with the taller cassette ratios of road bikes. The brakes of purpose-built flat-bar designs tend to be linear-pull, a mechanism nonexistent in road bikes and largely displaced by discs with mountain bikes
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Folding Bicycle
A folding bicycle is a bicycle designed to fold into a compact form, facilitating transport and storage. When folded, the bikes can be more easily carried into buildings, on public transportation (facilitating mixed-mode commuting and bicycle commuting), and more easily stored in compact living quarters or aboard a car, boat or plane. Folding mechanisms vary, with each offering a distinct combination of folding speed, folding ease, compactness, ride, weight, durability, and price. Distinguished by the complexities of their folding mechanism, more demanding structural requirements, greater number of parts, and more specialized market appeal, folding bikes may be more expensive than comparable non-folding models
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Freight Bicycle
Freight bicycles, carrier cycles, freight tricycles, cargo bikes, box bikes, or cycletrucks are human powered vehicles designed and constructed specifically for transporting loads. Vehicle designs include a cargo area consisting of an open or enclosed box, a flat platform, or a wire basket, usually mounted over one or both wheels, low behind the front wheel, or between parallel wheels at either the front or rear of the vehicle
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Glossary Of Cycling
This is a glossary of terms and jargon used in cycling, mountain biking, and cycle sport. For parts of a bicycle, see List of bicycle parts.Contents0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y ZSee also References External links0-9[edit] 27.5 Mountain bike A mountain bike with wheels that are approximately 27.5 inches (700 mm) in diameter and are based on ISO 584 mm (650B) rims. 29er (bicycle) A mountain bike with wheels that are approximately 29 inches (740 mm) in diameter and are based on ISO 622 mm (700C) rims. 3:1 rule a UCI rule stating the depth and breadth (in cross-section) of the bicycle frame tubes cannot exceed the ratio of 3:1.[1][2]A[edit] À bloc giving it all a rider has, going all out, riding as hard as one possibly can, which can be risky for it leaves one in a state where recovery is needed, and therefore vulnerable to being attacked. Example: "I really gave it all in the last kilometers,
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Mountain Bike
A mountain bike or mountain bicycle (abbreviated Mtn Bike or MTB[1]) is a bicycle designed for off-road cycling. Mountain bikes share similarities with other bikes, but incorporate features designed to enhance durability and performance in rough terrain. These typically include a front or full suspension, large knobby tires, more durable wheels, more powerful brakes, lower gear ratios for climbing steep grades, and higher gear ratios for going down steep grades.[citation needed] Mountain bikes are typically ridden on mountain trails, singletrack, fire roads, and other unpaved surfaces. This type of terrain commonly has rocks, roots, loose dirt, and steep grades. Many trails have additional TTF's (Technical Trail Features) such as log piles, log rides, rock gardens, skinnies, gap jumps, and wall-rides. Mountain bikes are built to handle these types of terrain and features
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Cold-weather Biking
Cold-weather biking
Cold-weather biking
or winter biking is the use of a bicycle during months when roads and paths are covered with ice, slush and snow. Cold weather cyclists face a number of challenges. Urban commuters on city streets may have to deal with "[s]now, slush, salt, and sand", which can cause rust and damage to metal bike components.[1] Slush and ice can jam derailleurs.[1] Some cyclists may bike differently in winter, by "...slow[ing] down on turns and brak[ing] gradually" in icy conditions.[2] Gaining traction on snow and ice-covered roads can be difficult.[3] Winter cyclists may use bikes with front and rear fenders,[1] metal studded winter tires[4] and flashing LED lights.[1][3] Winter cyclists may wear layers of warm clothes and "ea[r], face, and han[d]" coverings[5] may be used
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Mountain Biking
Mountain biking
Mountain biking
is the sport of riding bicycles off-road, often over rough terrain, using specially designed mountain bikes. Mountain bikes share similarities with other bikes but incorporate features designed to enhance durability and performance in rough terrain. Mountain biking can generally be broken down into multiple categories: cross country, trail riding, all mountain (also referred to as "Enduro"), downhill, freeride and dirt jumping. However, the majority of mountain biking falls into the categories of Trail
Trail
and Cross Country riding styles. The sport requires endurance, core strength and balance, bike handling skills, and self-reliance. Advanced riders pursue both steep technical descents and high incline climbs
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