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Aeneid
The Aeneid
Aeneid
(/ɪˈniːɪd/; Latin: Aeneis [ae̯ˈneːɪs]) is a Latin epic poem, written by Virgil
Virgil
between 29 and 19 BC,[1] that tells the legendary story of Aeneas, a Trojan who travelled to Italy, where he became the ancestor of the Romans. It comprises 9,896 lines in dactylic hexameter.[2] The first six of the poem's twelve books tell the story of Aeneas's wanderings from Troy
Troy
to Italy, and the poem's second half tells of the Trojans' ultimately victorious war upon the Latins, under whose name Aeneas
Aeneas
and his Trojan followers are destined to be subsumed. The hero Aeneas
Aeneas
was already known to Greco-Roman
Greco-Roman
legend and myth, having been a character in the Iliad
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Mediterranean Sea
The Mediterranean Sea
Sea
is a sea connected to the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by the Mediterranean Basin
Mediterranean Basin
and almost completely enclosed by land: on the north by Southern Europe
Southern Europe
and Anatolia, on the south by North Africa
North Africa
and on the east by the Levant. Although the sea is sometimes considered a part of the Atlantic Ocean, it is usually identified as a separate body of water
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Julio-Claudian Dynasty
Roman Religion Initially: Imperial cult Later: Nicene ChristianityEstate(s)Imperial Palaces of Palatine House of Augustus Domus Aurea Villa JovisDissolution AD 68 (AD 68)Deposition AD 68 (AD 68) (deposed by Galba)Roman imperial dynastiesJulio- Claudian
Claudian
dynastyThe statue known as the Augustus
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Federico Barocci
Federico Barocci
Federico Barocci
(c. 1535 in Urbino
Urbino
– 1612 in Urbino) was an Italian Renaissance
Renaissance
painter and printmaker. His original name was Federico Fiori, and he was nicknamed Il Baroccio. His work was highly esteemed and influential, and foreshadows the Baroque of Rubens.Contents1 Early life and training 2 Mature work in Rome
Rome
and Urbino 3 Critical assessment and legacy 4 Partial anthology of works 5 References 6 External linksEarly life and training[edit]Annunciation (1592–96) Oil on canvas, Santa Maria degli Angeli, Perugia.He was born at Urbino, Duchy of Urbino, and received his earliest apprenticeship with his father, Ambrogio Barocci, a sculptor of some local eminence. He was then apprenticed with the painter Battista Franco in Urbino
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Hebe (mythology)
Hebe (/ˈhiːˌbiː/; Greek: Ἥβη) in ancient Greek religion, is the goddess of youth[1] (Roman equivalent: Juventas).[2] She is the daughter of Zeus
Zeus
and Hera.[3] Hebe was the cupbearer for the gods and goddesses of Mount Olympus, serving their nectar and ambrosia, until she was married to Heracles
Heracles
(Roman equivalent: Hercules); her successor was the divine hero Ganymede. Another title of hers, for this reason, is Ganymeda. She also drew baths for her brother Ares[4] and helped Hera
Hera
enter her chariot.[5] Hebe was supposed to have the power to give eternal youth, and in art is typically seen with her father in the guise of an eagle, often offering a cup to her
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Greco-Roman
The Greco-Roman world, Greco-Roman culture, or the term Greco-Roman (/ˌɡrɛkoʊˈroʊmən/ or /ˌɡrɛkəˈroʊmən/); spelled Graeco-Roman in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the Commonwealth), when used as an adjective, as understood by modern scholars and writers, refers to those geographical regions and countries that culturally (and so historically) were directly, long-term, and intimately influenced by the language, culture, government and religion of the ancient Greeks and Romans. In exact terms the area refers to the "Mediterranean world", the extensive tracts of land centered on the Mediterranean and Black Sea
Black Sea
basins, the "swimming-pool and spa" of the Greeks and Romans, i.e
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Latins
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordic Bronze Age Terramare Tumulus
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Paul Cézanne
Paul Cézanne
Paul Cézanne
(US: /seɪˈzæn/ or UK: /sɪˈzæn/; French: [pɔl sezan]; 19 January 1839 – 22 October 1906) was a French artist and Post-Impressionist
Post-Impressionist
painter whose work laid the foundations of the transition from the 19th-century conception of artistic endeavor to a new and radically different world of art in the 20th century. Cézanne's often repetitive, exploratory brushstrokes are highly characteristic and clearly recognizable. He used planes of colour and small brushstrokes that build up to form complex fields. The paintings convey Cézanne's intense study of his subjects. Cézanne is said to have formed the bridge between late 19th-century Impressionism
Impressionism
and the early 20th century's new line of artistic enquiry, Cubism
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Princeton University Art Museum
The Princeton University
Princeton University
Art Museum
Art Museum
(PUAM) is the Princeton University's gallery of art, located in Princeton, New Jersey. Founded in 1882, it now houses over 92,000 works of art that range from antiquity to the contemporary period. The Princeton University
Princeton University
Art Museum dedicates itself to supporting and enhancing the University's goals of teaching, research, and service in fields of art and culture, as well as to serving regional communities and visitors from around the world. Its collections concentrate on the Mediterranean region, Western Europe, China, the United States, and Latin America. The museum has a large collection of Greek and Roman antiquities, including ceramics, marbles, bronzes, and Roman mosaics from Princeton University's excavations in Antioch. Medieval Europe is represented by sculpture, metalwork, and stained glass
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Legend
Legend
Legend
is a genre of folklore that consists of a narrative featuring human actions perceived both by teller and listeners to take place within human history. Narratives in this genre may demonstrate human values, and which possesses certain qualities that give the tale verisimilitude. Legend, for its active and passive participants, includes no happenings that are outside the realm of "possibility," but may include miracles. Legends may be transformed over time, in order to keep them fresh and vital, and realistic. Many legends operate within the realm of uncertainty, never being entirely believed by the participants, but also never being resolutely doubted.[1] The Brothers Grimm
Brothers Grimm
defined legend as folktale historically grounded.[2] A modern folklorist's professional definition of legend was proposed by Timothy R
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Greeks
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordic Bronze Age Terramare Tumulus
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Hector
In Greek mythology
Greek mythology
and Roman mythology, Hector
Hector
(/ˈhɛktər/; Ἕκτωρ Hektōr, pronounced [héktɔːr]) was a Trojan prince and the greatest fighter for Troy
Troy
in the Trojan War. As the first-born son of King Priam
Priam
and Queen Hecuba, who was a descendant of Dardanus and Tros, the founder of Troy,[1] he was a prince of the royal house and the heir apparent to his father's throne. He was married to Andromache, with whom he had an infant son, Scamandrius (whom the people of Troy
Troy
called Astyanax)
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Galleria Borghese
The Galleria Borghese
Galleria Borghese
(English: Borghese Gallery) is an art gallery in Rome, Italy, housed in the former Villa Borghese
Villa Borghese
Pinciana. At the outset, the gallery building was integrated with its gardens, but nowadays the Villa Borghese
Villa Borghese
gardens are considered a separate tourist attraction. The Galleria Borghese
Galleria Borghese
houses a substantial part of the Borghese collection
Borghese collection
of paintings, sculpture and antiquities, begun by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, the nephew of Pope Paul V
Pope Paul V
(reign 1605–1621)
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Punic Wars
The Punic Wars
Punic Wars
were a series of three wars fought between Rome and Carthage
Carthage
from 264 BC to 146 BC.[1] At the time, they were some of the largest wars that had ever taken place.[2] The term Punic comes from the Latin
Latin
word Punicus (or Poenicus), meaning "Carthaginian", with reference to the Carthaginians' Phoenician ancestry.[3] The main cause of the Punic Wars
Punic Wars
was the conflicts of interest between the existing Carthaginian Empire and the expanding Roman Republic. The Romans were initially interested in expansion via Sicily
Sicily
(which at that time was a cultural melting pot), part of which lay under Carthaginian control. At the start of the First Punic War
First Punic War
(264-241 BC), Carthage
Carthage
was the dominant power of the Western Mediterranean, with an extensive maritime empire
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