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Aeneas
In Greco-Roman
Greco-Roman
mythology, Aeneas
Aeneas
(/ɪˈniːəs/;[1] Greek: Αἰνείας, Aineías, possibly derived from Greek αἰνή meaning "praised") was a Trojan hero, the son of the prince Anchises and the goddess Aphrodite
Aphrodite
(Venus). His father was a first cousin of King Priam
Priam
of Troy
Troy
(both being grandsons of Ilus, founder of Troy), making Aeneas
Aeneas
a second cousin to Priam's children (such as Hector
Hector
and Paris). He is a character in Greek mythology
Greek mythology
and is mentioned in Homer's Iliad. Aeneas
Aeneas
receives full treatment in Roman mythology, most extensively in Virgil's Aeneid, where he is an ancestor of Romulus
Romulus
and Remus. He became the first true hero of Rome
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Origines
Origines ("Origins") is the title of a historical work by Marcus Porcius Cato.Contents1 History of the Text 2 References2.1 Notes 2.2 BibliographyHistory of the Text[edit] This highly original work was the first prose history in Latin, and among the very first Latin prose works in any genre. Along with Livius Andronicus, Naevius, Ennius
Ennius
and Plautus, Cato helped to found a new literature. According to Cato's biographer Cornelius Nepos, the Origines consisted of "seven books. Book I is the history of the early kings of Rome; books II and III the beginnings of each Italian city
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Snorri Sturluson
Snorri Sturluson[1] (Icelandic: [ˈsnɔrɪ ˈstʏrtlʏsɔn]; 1179 – 23 September 1241) was an Icelandic historian, poet, and politician. He was elected twice as lawspeaker to the Icelandic parliament, the Althing. He was the author of the Prose Edda
Prose Edda
or Younger Edda, which consists of Gylfaginning
Gylfaginning
("the fooling of Gylfi"), a narrative of Norse mythology, the Skáldskaparmál, a book of poetic language, and the Háttatal, a list of verse forms
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William Blake Richmond
Sir William Blake Richmond KCB, RA, PPRBSA (29 November 1842 – 11 February 1921),[1] was a portrait painter and a designer of stained glass and mosaic, whose works include mosaic decorations below the dome and in the apse of St Paul's cathedral in London. He was the Slade Professor of Fine Art at the University of Oxford from 1879 to 1883.Contents1 Life 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] William Blake Richmond was born in 1842 in London. His father George Richmond RA (1809–1896), himself the son of Thomas Richmond (1771–1837), painted the portraits of the most eminent people of his day and played a part in society. He was named after a close friend of his father, the artist William Blake. William received some coaching from Ruskin. In 1857 at the age of 14 he entered the Royal Academy schools, where he studied for about three years. A visit to Italy in 1859 gave him opportunity for studying the works of old masters and had an effect on his development
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Homeric Hymns
The Homeric Hymns are a collection of thirty-three anonymous ancient Greek hymns celebrating individual gods. The hymns are "Homeric" in the sense that they employ the same epic meter—dactylic hexameter—as the Iliad
Iliad
and Odyssey, use many similar formulas and are couched in the same dialect. They were uncritically attributed to Homer
Homer
himself in antiquity—from the earliest written reference to them, Thucydides
Thucydides
(iii.104)—and the label has stuck. "The whole collection, as a collection, is Homeric in the only useful sense that can be put upon the word;" A. W. Verrall
A. W

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Mount Ida
In Greek mythology, two sacred mountains are called Mount Ida, the "Mountain of the Goddess": Mount Ida
Mount Ida
in Crete; and Mount Ida
Mount Ida
in the ancient Troad
Troad
region of western Anatolia
Anatolia
(in modern-day Turkey) which was also known as the Phrygian Ida in classical antiquity and is the mountain that is mentioned in the Iliad
Iliad
of Homer
Homer
and the Aeneid
Aeneid
of Virgil. Both are associated with the mother goddess in the deepest layers of pre-Greek myth, in that Mount Ida
Mount Ida
in Anatolia
Anatolia
was sacred to Cybele, who is sometimes called Mater Idaea ("Idaean Mother"),[1] while Rhea, often identified with Cybele, put the infant Zeus
Zeus
to nurse with Amaltheia at Mount Ida
Mount Ida
in Crete
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Phrygia
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordic Bronze Age Terramare Tumulus
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Oinochoe
An oenochoe, also spelled oinochoe (Ancient Greek: οἰνοχόη; from Ancient Greek: οἶνος oînos, "wine" and Ancient Greek: wikt:χέω khéō, "I pour"; plural oenochoai or oinochoai), is a wine jug and a key form of ancient Greek pottery. There are many different forms of oenochoe; Sir John Beazley
John Beazley
distinguished ten types. The earliest is the olpe (ὀλπή, olpḗ), with no distinct shoulder and usually a handle rising above the lip. The "type 8 oenochoe" is what one would call a mug, with no single pouring point and a slightly curved profile. The chous (χοῦς; pl. choes) was a squat rounded form, with trefoil mouth. Small examples with scenes of children, as in the example illustrated, were placed in the graves of children.[1] Oenochoai may be decorated or undecorated.[2] Oenochoai typically have only one handle at the back and may include a trefoil mouth and pouring spout
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Musée Du Louvre
8.1 million (2017)Ranked 1st nationally Ranked 1st globallyDirector Jean-Luc MartinezCurator Marie-Laure de RochebrunePublic transit accessPalais Royal – Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
Louvre-Rivoli Website www.louvre.frThe Louvre
Louvre
(US: /ˈluːv(rə)/),[1] or the Louvre
Louvre
Museum (French: Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
[myze dy luvʁ] ( listen)), is the world's largest art museum and a historic monument in Paris, France. A central landmark of the city, it is located on the Right Bank of the Seine
Seine
in the city's 1st arrondissement (district or ward)
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Argos
Argos
Argos
(/ˈɑːrɡɒs, -ɡəs/; Modern Greek: Άργος [ˈarɣos]; Ancient Greek: Ἄργος [árɡos]) is a city in Argolis, the Peloponnese, Greece
Greece
and once was one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world.[citation needed] It is the biggest town in Argolis
Argolis
and a major centre for the area. Since the 2011 local government reform it has been part of the municipality of Argos-Mykines, of which it is a municipal unit.[2] The municipal unit has an area of 138.138 km2.[3] It is 11 kilometres (7 miles) from Nafplion, which was its historic harbour
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Utnapishtim
Utnapishtim
Utnapishtim
or Utanapishtim (Akkadian: 𒌓𒍣) is a character in the Epic of Gilgamesh
Epic of Gilgamesh
who is tasked by Enki
Enki
(Ea) to abandon his worldly possessions and create a giant ship to be called Preserver of Life. He was also tasked with bringing his wife, family, and relatives along with the craftsmen of his village, baby animals, and grains.[1] The oncoming flood would wipe out all animals and people not on the ship, a concept similar to the biblical story of Noah's Ark. After twelve days on the water, Utnapishtim
Utnapishtim
opened the hatch of his ship to look around and saw the slopes of Mount Nisir, where he rested his ship for seven days. On the seventh day, he sent a dove out to see if the water had receded, and the dove could find nothing but water, so it returned. Then he sent out a swallow, and just as before, it returned, having found nothing
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Cousin
Commonly, "cousin" refers to a "first cousin" or equivalently "full cousin", people whose most recent common ancestor is a grandparent.[1] A first cousin used to be known as a cousin-german, though this term is rarely used today.[2] More generally, cousin is a type of familial relationship in which people with a known common ancestor are both two or more generations away from their most recent common ancestor
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Baucis And Philemon
In Ovid's moralizing fable which stands on the periphery of Greek mythology and Roman mythology, Baucis and Philemon
Baucis and Philemon
were an old married couple in the region of Tyana, which Ovid
Ovid
places in Phrygia, and the only ones in their town to welcome disguised gods Zeus
Zeus
and Hermes
Hermes
(in Roman mythology, Jupiter and Mercury respectively), thus embodying the pious exercise of hospitality, the ritualized guest-friendship termed xenia, or theoxenia when a god was involved.Contents1 Story 2 Other versions2.1 In later texts3 See also 4 References and sourcesStory[edit] Zeus
Zeus
and Hermes
Hermes
came disguised as ordinary peasants, and began asking the people of the town for a place to sleep that night
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Lot (biblical Person)
Lot (/lɒt/; Hebrew: לוֹט‬, Modern Lōt, Tiberian Lōṭ, Lut (Arabic: لوط‎)"veil" or "covering"[1]) was a patriarch in the biblical Book of Genesis
Book of Genesis
chapters 11–14 and 19
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