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Adriel
Adriel (Hebrew: עדריאל) was a nobleman in the ancient kingdom of Israel. The meanings "God's flock" and "God is helper" have been proposed for the name.[1][2] Adriel was the son of Barzillai, the Meholathite. According to 1 Samuel 18:19, Saul married his daughter Merab to Adriel. However, 2 Samuel 21:8, in the Masoretic Text, records that Michal, another daughter of Saul "brought up" [R.V. "bare"] five sons with Adriel. This is in apparent conflict with 2 Samuel 6:23, which records that Michal
Michal
was barren, and 2 Samuel 3, which indicates that Michal was married to David, not Adriel. The claim that Michal
Michal
"brought up" these five sons has been taken to mean either that she treated them as if she had been their own mother, or that for "Michal" we should read "Merab" in 2 Samuel 21:8, as in 1 Sam
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Kingdom Of Israel (united Monarchy)
The United Monarchy (Hebrew: המלוכה המאוחדת‬) is the name given to the Israelite
Israelite
kingdom of Israel
Israel
and Judah,[1][2][3][4] during the reigns of Saul, David
David
and Solomon, as depicted in the Hebrew Bible. This is traditionally dated between 1050 and 930 BCE
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Saul The King
Saul
Saul
(/sɔːl/; Hebrew: שָׁאוּל‬, Modern Ša’ul, Tiberian Šā’ul, meaning "asked for, prayed for"; Latin: Saul; Arabic: طالوت‎, Ṭālūt or شاؤل, Ša'ūl), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the first king of the Kingdom of Israel
Israel
and Judah. His reign, traditionally placed in the late 11th century BCE,[1] marked a transition from a tribal society to statehood.[2] Saul's life and reign are described in the Hebrew Bible. He was anointed by the prophet Samuel
Samuel
and reigned from Gibeah. He fell on his sword (committing suicide) to avoid capture in the battle against the Philistines
Philistines
at Mount Gilboa, during which three of his sons were also killed. The succession to his throne was contested by Ish-bosheth, his only surviving son, and his son-in-law David, who eventually prevailed
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Masoretic Text
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Nash Papyrus
Nash Papyrus
(2nd century BCE) contains a portion of a pre-Masoretic Text, specifically the Ten Commandments
Ten Commandments
and the Shema Yisrael prayer.The Masoretic[1] Text (MT, 𝕸, or M displaystyle mathfrak M ) is the authoritative Hebrew and Aramaic text of the Tanakh
Tanakh
for Rabbinic Judaism. It was primarily copied, edited and distributed by a group of Jews
Jews
known as the Masoretes between the 7th and 10th centuries CE. The oldest extant manuscripts date from around the 9th century.[2] The Aleppo Codex
Aleppo Codex
(once the oldest-known complete copy but now missing the Torah) dates from the 10th century
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David
David[a] is described in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
as the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah. In the biblical narrative, David
David
is a young shepherd who first gains fame as a musician and later by killing Goliath. He becomes a favorite of King Saul
Saul
and a close friend of Saul's son Jonathan. Worried that David
David
is trying to take his throne, Saul
Saul
turns on David. After Saul and Jonathan are killed in battle, David
David
is anointed as King. David conquers Jerusalem, taking the Ark of the Covenant
Ark of the Covenant
into the city, and establishing the kingdom founded by Saul
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Copyist
A copyist is a person who makes copies. The term is sometimes used for artists who make copies of other artists' paintings. However, the modern use of the term is almost entirely confined to music copyists, who are employed by the music industry to produce neat copies from a composer or arranger's manuscript. Music copyists[edit] Until the 1990s, most copyists worked by hand to write out scores and individual instrumental parts neatly, using a calligraphy pen, manuscript paper, and often a ruler. Producing parts for an entire orchestra from a full score was a huge task. In the 1990s, copyists began using scorewriters - computer programs which are the music notation equivalent of a word processor. (Such programs include Sibelius, Finale, MuseScore
MuseScore
or GNU LilyPond)
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Error
Error
Error
means wrongContents1 Human behavior1.1 Gaffe 1.2 Medicine2 Science and engineering 3 Numerical analysis 4 Cybernetics 5 Biology 6 Philately 7 Law 8 Stock market 9 Governmental policy 10 Numismatics 11 See also 12 References 13 External linksHuman behavior[edit] One reference differentiates between "error" and "mistake" as follows:An 'error' is a deviation from accuracy or correctness. A 'mistake' is an error caused by a fault: the fault being misjudgment, carelessness, or forgetfulness. Now, say that I run a stop sign because I was in a hurry, and wasn't concentrating, and the police stop me, that is a mistake. If, however, I try to park in an area with conflicting signs, and I get a ticket because I was incorrect on my interpretation of what the signs meant, that would be an error. The first time it would be an error
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software creat
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Matthew George Easton
Matthew George Easton (1823–27 February 1894) was a Scottish minister and writer. His most known work is the Easton's Bible Dictionary, published three years after his death. The English translations of two of Franz Delitzsch's commentaries are among his other works. He studied at the University of Glasgow
University of Glasgow
[1] and served as minister of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in Girvan. References[edit]^ The University of Glasgow
University of Glasgow
Story: Matthew George Easton, accessed 5 November 2016External links[edit] Wikisource
Wikisource
has original works written by or about: Matthew George EastonEaston's Bible Dictionary at Christian Classics Ethereal LibraryAuthority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 85531768 LCCN: no2009176396 ISNI: 0000 0000 7268 0210 BIBSYS: 4051653 SNAC: w6dn7hhpThis biography of a Scottish religious figure is a stub
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Easton's Bible Dictionary
The Illustrated Bible
Bible
Dictionary,[a] better known as Easton's Bible Dictionary, is a reference work on topics related to the Christian Bible
Bible
compiled by Matthew George Easton. The first edition was published in 1893,[1] and a revised edition was published the following year.[2] The most popular edition, however, was the third, published by Thomas Nelson in 1897, three years after Easton's death.[3] The last contains nearly 4,000 entries relating to the Bible
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Hebrew Bible
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t ePage from an 11th-century Aramaic Targum
Targum
manuscript of the Hebrew Bible.Hebrew Bible
Bible
or Hebrew Scriptures (Latin: Biblia Hebraica) is the term used by biblical scholars to refer to the Tanakh
Tanakh
(Hebrew: תנ"ך‎; Latin: Thanach), the canonical collection of Jewish texts. They are composed mainly in Biblical Hebrew, with some passages in Biblical Aramaic (in the books of Daniel, Ezra and a few others). The Hebrew Bible
Bible
is the common textual source of several canonical editions of the Christian
Christian
Old Testament
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Merab
This list contains persons named in the Bible
Bible
of minor notability, about whom either nothing or very little is known, aside from any family connections. This literature-related list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.Contents A–K (previous page) L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y ZSee also ReferencesL[edit] Laadah[edit] Laadah or Ladah was a son of Shelah and a grandson of Judah. His son was Mareshah ( 1 Chr.
1 Chr.
4:21). Lael[edit] Lael ( Hebrew
Hebrew
לָאֵל "belonging to God") was a member of the house of Gershon according to Numbers 3:24. He was the father of Eliasaph. Lahmi[edit] Lahmi, according to 1 Chronicles
1 Chronicles
20:5, was the brother of Goliath, killed by David's warrior Elhanan. See also Elhanan son of Jair. Laish[edit] This entry is about the individual named Laish
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Michal
Michal
Michal
(/mɪˈxɑːl/; Hebrew: מיכל‎  [miˈχal]) was, according to the first Book of Samuel, the younger daughter of Saul, king of Israel, who loved and became the first wife of David, (1 Samuel 18:20–27) who later became king of Judah, and later still of the united Kingdom of Israel.Contents1 In the Bible 2 Legality of second marriage2.1 Offspring3 Michal
Michal
in poetry 4 Use as a name 5 NotesIn the Bible[edit] 1 Samuel 14:49 identifies Saul's elder daughter as Merab and younger daughter as Michal. Michal's story is recorded in the first Book of Samuel, where it is said in 1 Samuel 18:20 and 18:28 that Michal
Michal
loved David
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Adriel
Adriel (Hebrew: עדריאל) was a nobleman in the ancient kingdom of Israel. The meanings "God's flock" and "God is helper" have been proposed for the name.[1][2] Adriel was the son of Barzillai, the Meholathite. According to 1 Samuel 18:19, Saul married his daughter Merab to Adriel. However, 2 Samuel 21:8, in the Masoretic Text, records that Michal, another daughter of Saul "brought up" [R.V. "bare"] five sons with Adriel. This is in apparent conflict with 2 Samuel 6:23, which records that Michal
Michal
was barren, and 2 Samuel 3, which indicates that Michal was married to David, not Adriel. The claim that Michal
Michal
"brought up" these five sons has been taken to mean either that she treated them as if she had been their own mother, or that for "Michal" we should read "Merab" in 2 Samuel 21:8, as in 1 Sam
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