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Adrian Mckinty
Adrian McKinty is an Edgar Award winning Irish crime novelist and critic. He is a two-time winner of the Ned Kelly Award and a winner of the Barry Award, the Audie Award, the Anthony Award and has been shortlisted for the CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger, the Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year Award and the Grand Prix de Littérature Policière.Contents1 Early life 2 Literary debut 3 Journalism 4 Reception 5 Awards 6 Bibliography6.1 Michael Forsythe Trilogy 6.2 The Lighthouse Trilogy 6.3 The Sean Duffy series 6.4 Standalone books7 As editor 8 Notes and references 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Adrian McKinty was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
in 1968 and grew up in Victoria Council Estate, Carrickfergus, County Antrim
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Edgar Award
The Edgar Allan Poe
Edgar Allan Poe
Awards (popularly called the Edgars), named after Edgar Allan Poe, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America,[1] based in New York City.[2] They honor the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction, television, film, and theater published or produced in the previous year.Contents1 Categories 2 Best Novel award winners2.1 1950s 2.2 1960s 2.3 1970s 2.4 1980s 2.5 1990s 2.6 2000s 2.7 2010s3 1972 winners 4 2010 winners 5 2012 winners 6 2013 winners 7 2014 winners 8 2015 winners 9 2016 winn
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The Lighthouse Trilogy
The Lighthouse Trilogy [1] is a set of three books by Irish author Adrian McKinty. They are science fiction young adult novels set in New York City, in Ireland and on the fictional planet Altair.Contents1 The Lighthouse Land 2 The Lighthouse War 3 The Lighthouse Keepers 4 NotesThe Lighthouse Land[edit] The Lighthouse Land (Abrams, 2006) is the first installment. 13-year-old Jamie and his mother move to Ireland from Harlem when she inherits Muck Island. When they take up residence in the island's lighthouse, Jamie discovers that he has acquired some otherworldly responsibilities. With his friend Ramsay he travels to another planet, Altair, and helps fight off an invasion. The Lighthouse War[edit] The Lighthouse War (Abrams, 2007) is the second installment. In this book, Jamie O'Neill and his friend Ramsay have been back in Ireland for a year since their previous adventures on Altair. There is still part of Jamie that wants to be on Altair with the only girl who ever liked him
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Ken Bruen
Ken Bruen (born 1951) is an Irish writer of hard-boiled and noir crime fiction.Contents1 Biography 2 Literary Awards 3 Bibliography3.1 Non-Series 3.2 Jack Taylor 3.3 Detective Sergeant Tom Brant and Chief Inspector James Roberts 3.4 Max Fisher and Angela Petrakos 3.5 Adaptations4 Further reading 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Galway,[1] he was educated at Gormanston College, County Meath and later at Trinity College Dublin, where he earned a PhD in metaphysics. He spent twenty-five years as an English teacher in Africa, Japan, S.E. Asia and South America.[1] His travels have been hazardous at times, including a stint in a Brazilian jail. Bruen is part of a literary circle that includes Jason Starr, Reed Farrel Coleman, and Allan Guthrie. Bruen's works include the well-received White Trilogy and The Guards. In 2006, Hard Case Crime released Bust, a collaboration between Bruen and New York crime author Jason Starr
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Declan Hughes (writer)
Declan Hughes (born 1963) is an Irish novelist, playwright and screenwriter. He has been Writer-in-Association with the Abbey Theatre in Dublin and Irish Writer Fellow at Trinity College, Dublin. He has written a series of crime novels featuring the Irish-American detective Ed Loy
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John Connolly (author)
John Connolly (born 31 May 1968, Dublin) is an Irish writer who is best known for his series of novels starring private detective Charlie Parker.Contents1 Biography 2 Themes 3 Bibliography3.1 Charlie Parker series 3.2 Samuel Johnson series 3.3 The Chronicles of the Invaders trilogy 3.4 Other novels 3.5 Short story collections 3.6 Short stories 3.7 Nonfiction4 Film adaptations 5 Awards 6 Useful Links 7 ReferencesBiography[edit] Connolly graduated with a BA in English from Trinity College, Dublin, and an M.A. in journalism from Dublin
Dublin
City University. Before becoming a full-time novelist, he worked as a journalist, a barman, a local government official, a waiter and a gofer at Harrods
Harrods
department store in London. After five years as a freelance journalist for The Irish Times newspaper, he became frustrated with the profession, and began to write his first novel, Every Dead Thing, in his spare time
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Existential
Existentialism
Existentialism
(/ɛɡzɪˈstɛnʃəlɪzəm/)[1] is a tradition of philosophical inquiry associated mainly with certain 19th and 20th-century European philosophers who, despite profound doctrinal differences,[2][3][4] shared the belief that philosophical thinking begins with the human subject—not merely the thinking subject, but the acting, feeling, living human individual.[5] While the predominant value of existentialist thought is commonly acknowledged to be freedom, its primary virtue is authenticity.[6] In the view of the existentialist, the individual's starting poi
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Louis MacNeice
Frederick Louis MacNeice
Louis MacNeice
CBE
CBE
(12 September 1907 – 3 September 1963) was an Irish poet and playwright. He was part of the generation of the Auden Group that included W. H. Auden, Stephen Spender
Stephen Spender
and Cecil Day-Lewis. MacNeice's body of work was widely appreciated by the public during his lifetime, due in part to his relaxed, but socially and emotionally aware style
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Dennis Lehane
Dennis Lehane
Dennis Lehane
(born August 4, 1965)[1] is an American author. He has published more than a dozen novels; the first several were a series of mysteries featuring a couple of protagonists and other recurring characters, including A Drink Before the War. Of these, his fourth, Gone, Baby, Gone, was adapted as a 2007 film of the same name. Lehane has taken on different topics in other novels. Those adapted as films of the same name included Mystic River (2001), with a 2003 film by the same name, directed by Clint Eastwood, which won several awards
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Audie Awards
An Audie Award (or Audie), bestowed annually in the United States, recognizes outstanding audiobooks and spoken-word entertainment. The Audies have been granted by the Audio Publishers Association, the not-for-profit trade organization of the audiobook industry, since 1996. The nominees are announced each year in February, and the winners are announced at a gala banquet held in May, usually when the BookExpo America fair is happening. The Audies are sometimes promoted as "the Oscars of the audiobook industry" and serve as a way to promote audiobooks.[1][2] Awards are given in about thirty categories
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International Thriller Writers Awards
The International Thriller Writers Awards are awarded by International Thriller Writers at the annual Thrillerfest conferences for outstanding work in the field since 2006. Award winners[edit] 2006Thrillermaster: Clive Cussler Best Novel: The Patriots Club, Christopher Reich (Delacorte Press) Best First Novel: Improbable, Adam Fawer (William Morrow) Best Paperback Original: Pride Runs Deep, R. Cameron Cooke (Jove) Best Screenplay: Caché (Hidden), Michael Haneke2007Thrillermaster: James Patterson Best Novel: Killer Instinct, Joseph Finder (St. Martin's Press) Best First Novel: Mr Clarinet, Nick Stone (Penguin) Best Paperback Original: An Unquiet Grave, P.J
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Mystery Novels
Detective
Detective
fiction is a subgenre of crime fiction and mystery fiction in which an investigator or a detective—either professional, amateur or retired—investigates a crime, often murder. The detective genre began around the same time as speculative fiction and other genre fiction in the mid-nineteenth century and has remained extremely popular, particularly in novels.[1] Some of the most famous heroes of detective fiction include C. Auguste Dupin, Sherlock Holmes, and Hercule Poirot. Juvenile stories featuring The Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew, and The Boxcar Children
The Boxcar Children
have also remained in print for several decades
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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In The Morning I'll Be Gone
In the Morning I'll be Gone is a 2014 novel by Irish/Australian novelist Adrian McKinty which won the 2014 Ned Kelly Award for Best Novel. It is the third in the author's Sean Duffy series, following The Cold Cold Ground and I Hear the Sirens in the Street.Contents1 Plot summary 2 Notes 3 Reviews 4 Awards and nominations 5 ReferencesPlot summary[edit] In Belfast, September 1983, in the middle of The Troubles, Sergeant Sean Duffy is drummed out of the Royal Ulster Constabulary on trumped up charges. At the same time, Dermot McCann, an IRA master bomber and ex-schoolmate of Duffy's escapes from the Maze and becomes a prime target of British Intelligence. MI5 drags Duffy out of his drunken retirement to track down McCann
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Stuart Neville
Stuart Neville is a Northern Irish author best known for his novel The Twelve or, as it is known in the United States, The Ghosts of Belfast.Contents1 Works 2 Awards and nominations 3 Bibliography3.1 Novels 3.2 Short Stories4 ReferencesWorks[edit] The Twelve was placed on the Best of 2009 lists by both The New York Times and Los Angeles Times.[1][2] The book has been given full reviews in a number of publications in the United States, Ireland and the United Kingdom, appearing in The New York Times, The Irish Times, Los Angeles Times, Publishers Weekly and The Guardian, among others.[3][4][5][6] Collusion, the sequel to The Twelve, was published in the United Kingdom by Harvill Secker in August 2010, and in the USA by Soho Press in October 2010. The book was reviewed in New York Journal of Books.[7] Ratlines was published in January 2013 in the US by Soho Crime
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