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Adonizedek
Adonizedek (Hebrew: אֲדֹנִי־צֶ֫דֶק‎ Ăḏōnî-ṣeḏeq), Adoni-Zedek, or Adoni-zedec was, according to the Book of Joshua, king of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
at the time of the Israelite invasion of Canaan.[1] According to Cheyne and Black, the name originally meant "Ṣedeḳ is lord," but would likely have been read later as meaning "lord of righteousness."[2] Adonizedek led a coalition of five of the neighboring Amorite
Amorite
rulers (Hoham, king of Hebron; Piram, king of Jarmuth; Japhia, king of Lachish; and Debir, king of Eglon) in resisting the invasion, but the allies were defeated at Gibeon, and suffered at Beth-horon, not only from their pursuers, but also from a great hail storm
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Hebrew Language
Hebrew (/ˈhiːbruː/; עִבְרִית, Ivrit [ʔivˈʁit] ( listen) or [ʕivˈɾit] ( listen)) is a Northwest Semitic language native to Israel, spoken by over 9 million people worldwide.[8][9] Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites
Israelites
and their ancestors, although the language was not referred to by the name Hebrew in the Tanakh.[note 1] The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date from the 10th century BCE.[10] Hebrew belongs to the West Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family
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Joshua
Joshua
Joshua
(/ˈdʒɒʃuə/) or Jehoshua (Hebrew: יְהוֹשֻׁעַ‬ Yehōšuʿa)[a] is the central figure in the Hebrew
Hebrew
Bible's Book of Joshua. According to the books of Exodus, Numbers and Joshua, he was Moses' assistant and became the leader of the Israelite
Israelite
tribes after the death of Moses.[3] His name was Hoshe'a (הוֹשֵׁעַ) the son of Nun, of the tribe of Ephraim, but Moses
Moses
called him Joshua
Joshua
(Numbers 13:16), the name by which he is commonly known. The name is shortened to Yeshua in Nehemiah (Nehemiah 8:17)
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Matthew George Easton
Matthew George Easton (1823–27 February 1894) was a Scottish minister and writer. His most known work is the Easton's Bible Dictionary, published three years after his death. The English translations of two of Franz Delitzsch's commentaries are among his other works. He studied at the University of Glasgow
University of Glasgow
[1] and served as minister of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in Girvan. References[edit]^ The University of Glasgow
University of Glasgow
Story: Matthew George Easton, accessed 5 November 2016External links[edit] Wikisource
Wikisource
has original works written by or about: Matthew George EastonEaston's Bible Dictionary at Christian Classics Ethereal LibraryAuthority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 85531768 LCCN: no2009176396 ISNI: 0000 0000 7268 0210 BIBSYS: 4051653 SNAC: w6dn7hhpThis biography of a Scottish religious figure is a stub
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Jewish Encyclopedia
The Jewish Encyclopedia[n 1] is an English encyclopedia containing over 15,000 articles on the history, culture, and state of Judaism
Judaism
and the Jews
Jews
up to the early 20th century.[1] It was originally published in 12 volumes by Funk and Wagnalls
Funk and Wagnalls
of New York City
New York City
between 1901 and 1906 and reprinted in the 1960s by KTAV Publishing House. The work's scholarship is still highly regarded: the American Jewish Archives
American Jewish Archives
has called it "the most monumental Jewish scientific work of modern times"[2] and Rabbi
Rabbi
Joshua L
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Isidore Singer
Isidore Singer (10 November 1859, Hranice/Přerov District, Moravia, Austria – 1939, New York City) was an editor of the Jewish Encyclopedia and founder of the American League for the Rights of Man.Contents1 Biography1.1 France 1.2 New York2 Religious views 3 Publications 4 References4.1 SourcesBiography[edit] He was born in 1859 in Weisskirchen, Moravia, in the Austrian Empire (today, Hranice/Přerov District, Czech Republic). Singer studied at the Universities of Vienna
Vienna
and Berlin, receiving his Ph.D. in 1884.[1] France[edit] After editing the Allgemeine oesterreichische Literaturzeitung [Austrian literary newspaper] from 1885 to 1886, he became literary secretary to the French ambassador in Vienna.[2] From 1887, he worked in Paris
Paris
in the press bureau of the French foreign office and was active in the campaign on behalf of Alfred Dreyfus
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5] Other works are actively dedicated
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Genesis Rabbah
—— Tannaitic ——Mishnah Tosefta—— Amoraic (Gemara) ——Jerusalem Talmud Babylonian Talmud—— Later ——Minor TractatesHalakhic Midrash—— Exodus ——Mekhilta of Rabbi
Rabbi
Ishmael Mekhilta of Rabbi Shimon
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Lab'ayu
Labaya (also transliterated as Labayu or Lib'ayu) was a 14th-century BCE ruler or warlord in the central hill country of southern Canaan. He lived contemporaneously with Pharaoh Akhenaten. Labaya is mentioned in several of the Amarna Letters (abbreviated "EA", for 'el Amarna'), which is practically all scholars know about him. He is the author of letters EA 252–54. Labaya was active over the whole length of Samaria and slightly beyond, as he gave land to Habiru in the vicinity of Šakmu (Shechem) and he and his sons threatened such powerful towns as Jerusalem and Gazru (Gezer) to the south, and Megiddo to the north.Contents1 Career 2 List of Labaya's three letters to Pharaoh 3 Identifications with Biblical figures 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksCareer[edit]Map of Samaria and its eastern and northern neighborsThe Amarna letters give an incomplete look at Labaya's career
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Abdi-Heba
Abdi-Heba
Abdi-Heba
(Abdi-Kheba, Abdi-Hepat, or Abdi-Hebat) was a local chieftain of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
during the Amarna
Amarna
period (mid-1330s BC). Abdi-Heba's name can be translated as "servant of Hebat", a Hurrian goddess. Whether Abdi-Heba
Abdi-Heba
was himself of Hurrian
Hurrian
descent is unknown, as is the relationship between the general populace of pre-Israelite Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(called, several centuries later, Jebusites in the Bible) and the Hurrians
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Joshua 10
The Book
Book
of Joshua
Joshua
(Hebrew: ספר יהושע‎ Sefer Yĕhôshúa) is the sixth book in the Hebrew Bible
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Egypt
Coordinates: 26°N 30°E / 26°N 30°E / 26; 30Arab Republic
Republic
of Egyptجمهورية مصر العربيةArabic: Jumhūrīyat Miṣr al-ʿArabīyahEgyptian: Gomhoreyet Maṣr El ʿArabeyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Bilady, Bilady, Bilady" "بلادي، بلادي، بلادي" "My country, my country, my country"Capital and largest city Cairo 30°2′N 31°13′E / 30.033°N 31.217°E / 30.033; 31.217Official languages Arabic[a]National language Egyptian ArabicReligion90% Islam 9% Orthodox Christian 1% Other Christian[1]Demonym EgyptianGovernment Unitary semi-presidential republic• PresidentAbdel Fattah el-Sisi• Prime MinisterSherif IsmailLegislature House of RepresentativesEstablishment• Unification of Upper and Lower Egypt[2][3][b]c
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Pharaoh
Pharaoh
Pharaoh
(/ˈfeɪ.roʊ/, /fɛr.oʊ/[1][2] or /fær.oʊ/;[2] Coptic: ⲡⲣ̅ⲣⲟ Prro) is the common title of the monarchs of ancient Egypt from the First Dynasty (c. 3150 BCE) until the annexation of Egypt by the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in 30 BCE,[3] although the actual term "Pharaoh" was not used contemporaneously for a ruler until circa 1200 BCE. In the early dynasty, ancient Egyptian kings used to have up to three titles, the Horus, the Nesu Bety, and the Nebty name. The Golden Horus
Horus
and Nomen and prenomen titles were later added. In Egyptian society, religion was central to everyday life. One of the roles of the pharaoh was as an intermediary between the gods and the people. The pharaoh thus deputised for the gods; his role was both as civil and religious administrator
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Amarna Letters
The Amarna
Amarna
letters (sometimes referred to as the Amarna
Amarna
correspondence or Amarna
Amarna
tablets, and cited with the abbreviation EA) are an archive, written on clay tablets, primarily consisting of diplomatic correspondence between the Egyptian administration and its representatives in Canaan
Canaan
and Amurru during the New Kingdom. The letters were found in Upper Egypt
Upper Egypt
at Amarna, the modern name for the ancient Egyptian capital of Akhetaten (el-Amarna), founded by pharaoh Akhenaten
Akhenaten
(1350s – 1330s BC) during the Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt. The Amarna
Amarna
letters are unusual in Egyptological research, because they are mostly written in Akkadian cuneiform, the writing system of ancient Mesopotamia, rather than that of ancient Egypt
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Easton's Bible Dictionary
The Illustrated Bible
Bible
Dictionary,[a] better known as Easton's Bible Dictionary, is a reference work on topics related to the Christian Bible
Bible
compiled by Matthew George Easton. The first edition was published in 1893,[1] and a revised edition was published the following year.[2] The most popular edition, however, was the third, published by Thomas Nelson in 1897, three years after Easton's death.[3] The last contains nearly 4,000 entries relating to the Bible
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