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Adela Of Champagne
Adela of Champagne
Adela of Champagne
(French: Adèle; c. 1140 – 4 June 1206), also known as Adelaide and Alix, was Queen of France
Queen of France
as the third wife of Louis VII. She was the daughter of Theobald II, Count of Champagne, and Matilda of Carinthia, and was named after her grandmother, Adela of Normandy. She was regent of France in the absence of her son in 1190. Life[edit] Louis and Adela married on 13 November 1160, five weeks after his previous wife, Constance of Castile, died in childbirth. Queen Adèle was the mother of Louis VII's only son, Philip II, and of the Byzantine empress Agnes.[2] Adela was active in the political life of the kingdom, along with her brothers Henry I, Theobald V, and Guillaume aux Blanches Mains
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Coronation
A coronation is the act of placement or bestowal of a crown upon a monarch's head. The term generally also refers not only to the physical crowning but to the whole ceremony wherein the act of crowning occurs, along with the presentation of other items of regalia, marking the formal investiture of a monarch with regal power. Aside from the crowning, a coronation ceremony may comprise many other rituals such as the taking of special vows by the monarch, the investing and presentation of regalia to the monarch, and acts of homage by the new ruler's subjects and the performance of other ritual deeds of special significance to the particular nation. Western-style coronations have often included anointing the monarch with holy oil, or chrism as it is often called; the anointing ritual's religious significance follows examples found in the Bible
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Robert I, Duke Of Normandy
Robert the Magnificent (French: le Magnifique;[a] 22 June 1000 – 1–3 July 1035), was the Duke of Normandy
Duke of Normandy
from 1027 until his death in 1035. Owing to uncertainty over the numbering of the Dukes of Normandy
Normandy
he is usually called Robert I, but sometimes Robert II with his ancestor Rollo
Rollo
as Robert I. He was the son of Richard II and brother of Richard III, who preceded him as the Duke. Less than a year after his father's death, Robert revolted against his brother's rule and deposed him
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Third Crusade
Treaty
Treaty
of JaffaA truce of three years resulting from Crusader military victories. Recognition of the territorial status quo at the end of active campaigning, including continued Muslim
Muslim
control of
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Pontigny Abbey
The Cathedral-Abbey of the Assumption in Pontigny (French: Cathédrale-abbatiale de Notre-Dame-de-l’Assomption à Pontigny), commonly known as Pontigny Abbey, was a Cistercian monastery located in Pontigny on the River Serein, in the present diocese of Sens and department of Yonne, Burgundy, France. Founded in 1114, it was the second of the four great daughter houses of Cîteaux Abbey.Contents1 History 2 Burials 3 Viticulture 4 Pilgrims' Route 5 Notes 6 External linksHistory[edit] Hildebert (or Ansius), a canon of Auxerre, petitioned Abbot Stephen Harding of Cîteaux to found a monastery in a place he had selected for this purpose
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Blois
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Kingdom of France
France
portal Brittany portal Normandy portal Middle Ages
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Odo II, Count Of Blois
Odo II (French: Eudes le Champenois) (983 – 15 November 1037) was the Count of Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Beauvais
Beauvais
and Tours from 1004 and Count of Troyes
Count of Troyes
(as Odo IV) and
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Theobald III, Count Of Blois
Theobald III of Blois
Blois
(French: Thibaut) (1012–1089) was count of Blois, Meaux
Meaux
and Troyes. He was son of Odo II, Count of Blois[1] and Ermengarde of Auvergne.[2]Contents1 Inherits Blois 2 Gains Champagne 3 Death 4 Family and children 5 References 6 SourcesInherits Blois[edit] Upon his father's death in 1037, Theobald inherited amongst others the counties of Blois,[1] Tours, Chartres. Châteaudun
Châteaudun
and Sancerre, and also in Champagne: Château-Thierry, Provins
Provins
and St. Florentin. His brother Stephen inherited the counties of Meaux, Troyes
Troyes
and Vitry-le-François
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Stephen II, Count Of Blois
Stephen
Stephen
or Steven is a common English first name. It is particularly significant to Christians, as it belonged to Saint Stephen
Saint Stephen
(Greek Στέφανος Stéphanos), an early disciple and deacon who, according to the Book of Acts, was stoned to death; he is widely regarded as the first martyr (or "protomartyr") of the Christian Church. The name "Stephen" (and its more common variant "Steven")[1] is derived from Greek Στέφανος (Stéphanos), a first name from the Greek word στέφανος (stéphanos), meaning "wreath, crown" and by extension "reward, honor", from the verb στέφειν (stéphein), "to encircle, to wreathe".[2][3] In Ancient Greece, crowning wreaths (such as laurel wreaths) were given to the winners of contests
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Herbert I, Count Of Maine
Herbert I (died 13 April 1035), called Wakedog (from French Eveille-chien, Latinized as Evigilans Canis), was the count of Maine from 1017 until his death. He had a turbulent career with an early victory that may have contributed to his later decline.Contents1 Life 2 Issue 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] He was the son of Hugh III and succeeded his father as count of Maine.[a][1] Herbert was, at times, a nominal vassal of his neighbor Fulk III Nerra, Count of Anjou but otherwise considered himself independent[2] and obtained his nickname "Wake-dog" for having to constantly resist the intrusions of his Angevin neighbors to the south.[3] From the time Herbert became count in 1017, he was almost constantly at war with Avesgaud de Bellême, Bishop of Le Mans.[4] In 1016, a young Herbert was allied to Fulk III in a war against Odo II of Blois.[5] On July 6 Odo was en route to attack the fortress of Montrichard
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William The Conqueror
William I[a] (c. 1028[1] – 9 September 1087), usually known as William the Conqueror
William the Conqueror
and sometimes William the Bastard,[2][b] was the first Norman King of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in 1087. A descendant of Rollo, he was Duke
Duke
of Normandy
Normandy
(as William II) from 1035 onward. After a long struggle to establish his power, by 1060 his hold on Normandy
Normandy
was secure, and he launched the Norman conquest of England
Norman conquest of England
six years later. The rest of his life was marked by struggles to consolidate his hold over England and his continental lands and by difficulties with his eldest son. William was the son of the unmarried Robert I, Duke
Duke
of Normandy, by Robert's mistress Herleva
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Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor
Frederick I (German: Friedrich I, Italian: Federico I; 1122 – 10 June 1190), also known as Frederick Barbarossa (Italian: Federico Barbarossa), was the Holy Roman Emperor
Holy Roman Emperor
from 1155 until his death. He was elected King of Germany
King of Germany
at Frankfurt
Frankfurt
on 4  March 1152 and crowned in Aachen
Aachen
on 9 March 1152. He became King of Italy
King of Italy
in 1155 and was crowned Roman Emperor by Pope Adrian  IV on 18 June 1155. Two years later, the term sacrum ("holy") first appeared in a document in connection with his Empire.[1] He was later formally crowned King of Burgundy, at Arles
Arles
on 30 June 1178
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Herleva
Herleva[a] (c. 1003 – c. 1050) was a Norman woman of the 11th century, known for three sons: William I of England
William I of England
"the Conqueror", an illegitimate son fathered by Robert I, Duke of Normandy; and Odo of Bayeux
Bayeux
and Robert, Count of Mortain, who were both fathered by her husband Herluin de Conteville. All three became prominent in William's realm.Contents1 Life1.1 Relationship with Robert the Magnificent 1.2 Marriage to Herluin de Conteville2 Death 3 Notes 4 Sources 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] The background of Herleva
Herleva
and the circumstances of William's birth are shrouded in mystery
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Baldwin V, Count Of Flanders
Baldwin V of Flanders
Flanders
(19 August 1012, Arras, Flanders
Flanders
– 1 September 1067, Lille, Flanders) was Count of Flanders
Flanders
from 1035 until his death. He was the son of Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders, who died in 1035.Contents1 History 2 Family 3 References 4 BibliographyHistory[edit] In 1028 Baldwin married Adèle of France in Amiens, daughter of King Robert II of France;[1] at her instigation he rebelled against his father but in 1030 peace was sworn and the old count continued to rule until his death. During a long war (1046–1056) as an ally of Godfrey the Bearded, Duke of Lorraine, against the Holy Roman Emperor
Holy Roman Emperor
Henry III, he initially lost Valenciennes
Valenciennes
to Herman, Count of Mons
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Matilda Of Flanders
Matilda of Flanders
Flanders
(French: Mathilde; Dutch: Machteld) (c. 1031 – 2 November 1083) was Queen of England and Duchess of Normandy
Normandy
by marriage to William the Conqueror, and sometime Regent
Regent
of these realms during his absence. She was the mother of ten children who survived to adulthood, including two kings, William II and Henry I. As a niece and granddaughter of kings of France, Matilda was of grander birth than William, who was illegitimate, and, according to some suspiciously romantic tales, she initially refused his proposal on this account. Her descent from the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
royal House of Wessex was also to become a useful card. Like many royal marriages of the period, it breached the rules of consanguinity, then at their most restrictive (to seven generations or degrees of relatedness); Matilda and William were third-cousins, once removed
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Adela Of France, Countess Of Flanders
Adèle of France,[a] known also as Adela the Holy or Adela of Messines; (1009 – 8 January 1079, Messines), was, by marriage, the Duchess of Normandy
Duchess of Normandy
(January 1027 – August 1027), Countess of Flanders (1035–1067).Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 Ancestry 4 Notes 5 ReferencesLife[edit] Adèle was the second daughter of Robert II (the Pious), and Constance of Arles.[1] She is usually identified with the noble Adèle who in January 1027 married Richard III, Duke of Normandy.[2] The marriage was short-lived for on 6 August of that same year Richard III suddenly died.[2] Adèle of France married Baldwin V, Count of Flanders in 1028.[3] Adèle's influence lay mainly through her family connections
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