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Addiscombe Military Seminary
The East India Company
East India Company
Military Seminary was a British military academy at Addiscombe, Surrey, in what is now the London Borough of Croydon. It opened in 1809 and closed in 1861. Its purpose was to train young officers to serve in the East India
India
Company’s private army in India. The institution was formally known as the East India Company
East India Company
Military Seminary (a name the cadets always disliked) until 1855, when the name was changed to the East India Company
East India Company
Military College.[1][2] In 1858, when the college was taken over by the government, it was renamed the Royal India
India
Military College
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Entablature
An entablature (/ɛnˈtæblətʃər/; nativization of Italian intavolatura, from in "in" and tavola "table") is the superstructure of moldings and bands which lie horizontally above columns, resting on their capitals. Entablatures are major elements of classical architecture, and are commonly divided into the architrave (the supporting member immediately above; equivalent to the lintel in post and lintel construction), the frieze (an unmolded strip that may or may not be ornamented), and the cornice (the projecting member below the pediment). The Greek and Roman temples are believed to be based on wooden structures, the design transition from wooden to stone structures being called petrification. Overview[edit] The structure of the entablature varies with the three classical orders: Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian. In each, the proportions of the subdivisions (architrave, frieze, cornice) are defined by the proportions of the column in the order
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Archbishop Of Canterbury
The Archbishop of Canterbury
Canterbury
is the senior bishop and principal leader of the Church of England, the symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of Canterbury. The current archbishop is Justin Welby, who was enthroned at Canterbury Cathedral on 21 March 2013. Welby is the 105th in a line which goes back more than 1400 years to Augustine of Canterbury, the "Apostle to the English", sent from Rome
Rome
in the year 597. Welby succeeded Rowan Williams.[1] From the time of Augustine until the 16th century, the Archbishops of Canterbury
Canterbury
were in full communion with the See of Rome
Rome
and usually received the pallium from the Pope. During the English Reformation, the Church of England
Church of England
broke away from the authority of the Catholic Church
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Military Science
Military science
Military science
is the study of military processes, institutions, and behavior, along with the study of warfare, and the theory and application of organized coercive force.[1] It is mainly focused on theory, method, and practice of producing military capability in a manner consistent with national defense policy. Military science serves to identify the strategic, political, economic, psychological, social, operational, technological, and tactical elements necessary to sustain relative advantage of military force; and to increase the likelihood and favorable outcomes of victory in peace or during a war. Military scientists include theorists, researchers, experimental scientists, applied scientists, designers, engineers, test technicians, and other military personnel. Military personnel obtain weapons, equipment, and training to achieve specific strategic goals
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Public School (United Kingdom)
A public school in England and Wales
England and Wales
is an older, student-selective, fee-charging independent secondary school that caters primarily for children aged between 11 or 13 and 18, and whose head teacher is a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference[1] (HMC). The term "public" should not be misunderstood to mean that these schools are part of the public sector (that is, funded from public taxes); they are in fact part of the private sector
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Croydon Minster
Coordinates: 51°22′22″N 0°06′22″W / 51.3727°N 0.1061°W / 51.3727; -0.1061 Croydon
Croydon
MinsterThe Minster Church of St John Baptist at Croydon Croydon
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Swordsmanship
Swordsmanship
Swordsmanship
or sword fighting refers to the skills of a swordsman, a person versed in the art of the sword. The term is modern, and as such was mainly used to refer to smallsword fencing, but by extension it can also be applied to any martial art involving the use of a sword. The formation of the English word "swordsman" is parallel to the Latin word gladiator,[1] a term for the professional fighters who fought against each other and a variety of other foes for the entertainment of spectators in the Roman Empire
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Pontoon Bridge
A pontoon bridge (or ponton bridge), also known as a floating bridge, uses floats or shallow-draft boats to support a continuous deck for pedestrian and vehicle travel. The buoyancy of the supports limits the maximum load they can carry. Most pontoon bridges are temporary, used in wartime and civil emergencies. Permanent floating bridges are useful for sheltered water-crossings where it is not considered economically feasible to suspend a bridge from anchored piers
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Addington Palace
Addington Palace
Addington Palace
is an 18th-century mansion in Addington near Croydon in south London, England. It was built on the site of a 16th-century manor house.Contents1 History 2 Current usage 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The original manor house called 'Addington Place' was built about the 16th century. An ancient recipe for Malepigernout (or Dillegrout), a spiced chicken porridge, was historically made by the current Lord of the Manor of Addington to be served upon the Coronation of the Monarch of England. The Leigh family gained this serjeanty upon becoming Lords of the Manor of Addington prior to the coronation of Charles II in 1661
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Marlow, Buckinghamshire
Marlow (historically Great Marlow
Great Marlow
or Chipping Marlow) is a town and civil parish within Wycombe district
Wycombe district
in south Buckinghamshire, England. It is located on the River Thames, 4 miles (6.5 km) south-southwest of High Wycombe, 5 miles (8 km) west-northwest of Maidenhead
Maidenhead
and 33 miles (53 km) west of central London.Contents1 Name 2 History 3 Geography 4 Landmarks 5 Twinning 6 Transport 7 Education 8 Sport8.1 Regatta9 Marlow FM 97.5 10 Notable people 11 Cultural references 12 Gallery 13 References 14 External linksName[edit] The name is recorded in 1015 as Mere lafan, meaning "Land left after the draining of a pond" in Old English.[3] From Norman times the manor, parish, and later borough were formally known as Great Marlow, distinguishing them from Little Marlow. The ancient parish was large, including rural areas north and west of the town
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Field Marshal
Field marshal
Field marshal
(or field-marshal, abbreviated as FM) is a very senior military rank, ordinarily senior to the general officer ranks. Usually it is the highest rank in an army, and when it is, few (if any) persons are appointed to it. It is considered as a five-star rank (OF-10) in modern-day armed forces in many countries. Promotion to the rank of field marshal in many countries historically required extraordinary military achievement by a general (a wartime victory). However, the rank has also been used as a divisional command rank and also as a brigade command rank
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Coatee
A coatee was a type of tight fitting uniform coat or jacket, which was waist length at the front and had short tails behind. The coatee began to replace the long tail coat in western armies at the end of the eighteenth century, but was itself superseded by the tunic in the mid nineteenth century.[1] A coatee, worn with a waistcoat or vest, remains part of formal Highland dress.[2] References[edit]^ Kannik, Preben (1968), Military
Military
Uniforms of the World in Colour, Blandford Press Ltd, ISBN 0-71370482-9 (p. 270) ^ "Month Four: Deciding Groomswear". scottishwedding.visitscotland.com. VisitScotland. Retrieved 1 March 2014. This military-related article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis fashion-related article is a stub
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Indian Rebellion Of 1857
British victorySuppression of the revolt Formal end of the Mughal empire End of Company rule in India Transfer of rule to the British CrownTerritorial changes British Indian Empire created out of former East India
India
Company territory (some land returned to native rulers, other land confiscated by the British crown)Belligerents Sepoy
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India's First War Of Independence (term)
The Indian Rebellion of 1857 has been variously termed as a war of independence, a rebellion, and a mutiny. Several Indian writers, who consider it as a part of the Indian independence movement that ultimately led to the country's independence in 1947, have termed it as "The First War of Independence", the "great revolution", the "great rebellion", and the "Indian freedom struggle". Several British writers, who view it as a military disturbance, have termed it as "sepoy revolt", "sepoy war", "Indian rebellion", and the "great revolt"
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War Office
The War Office[1] was a department of the British Government responsible for the administration of the British Army
British Army
between 1857 and 1964, when its functions were transferred to the Ministry of Defence. Until 1855 a number of independent offices and individuals were responsible for various aspects of Army administration. The three most important were the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces, the Secretary at War and the Secretary of State for War
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