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Adaptive Reuse
Adaptive reuse
Adaptive reuse
refers to the process of reusing an old site or building for a purpose other than which it was built or designed for. Along with brownfield reclamation, adaptive reuse is seen by many as a key factor in land conservation and the reduction of urban sprawl. However adaptive reuse can become controversial as there is sometimes a blurred line between renovation, facadism and adaptive reuse. It can be regarded as a compromise between historic preservation and demolition.Contents1 Definition 2 Factors affecting adaptive reuse2.1 Criteria for adaptive reuse 2.2 Economic considerations 2.3 Advantages of adaptive reuse 2.4 Barriers to adaptive reuse3 By location3.1 Americas3.1.1 Canada 3.1.2 United States3.2 Australia 3.3 Europe4 See also 5 Notes 6 External links and further readingDefinition[edit] Adaptive reuse
Adaptive reuse
deals with the issues of conservation and heritage policies
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Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
(/ˌpɛnsɪlˈveɪniə/ ( listen); Pennsylvania German: Pennsylvaani or Pennsilfaani), officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
run through its middle. The Commonwealth is bordered by Delaware
Delaware
to the southeast, Maryland
Maryland
to the south, West Virginia
West Virginia
to the southwest, Ohio
Ohio
to the west, Lake Erie
Lake Erie
and the Canadian province of Ontario
Ontario
to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey
New Jersey
to the east. Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
is the 33rd-largest, the 5th-most populous, and the 9th-most densely populated of the 50 United States
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Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(/ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the sixth-most populous city in the United States, with an estimated population of 1,567,872[7] and more than 6 million in the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area, as of 2016[update].[5] Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the economic and cultural anchor of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley, located along the lower Delaware
Delaware
and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis
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Gooderham & Worts
Gooderham and Worts, also known as Gooderham & Worts Limited, was a Canadian distiller of alcoholic beverages. It was once the largest distiller in Canada. The company was merged with Hiram Walker, which was in turn sold to Allied Lyons. Its distillery facility on the Toronto waterfront was closed in the 1990s. The buildings, dating to the 1860s, were preserved and repurposed as the "Distillery District" arts and entertainment district.Contents1 Early history 2 Expansion 3 Later history 4 References 5 External linksEarly history[edit] The company was founded by James Worts and his brother-in-law, William Gooderham. Worts had owned a mill in Diss, England, moved to Toronto in 1831 and established himself in the same business. He built a prominent windmill at the Toronto waterfront near the mouth of the Don River. The next year, Gooderham joined him in Toronto and in the business
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Distillery
Distillation
Distillation
is the process of separating the components or substances from a liquid mixture by selective boiling and condensation. Distillation
Distillation
may result in essentially complete separation (nearly pure components), or it may be a partial separation that increases the concentration of selected components of the mixture. In either case the process exploits differences in the volatility of the mixture's components. In industrial chemistry, distillation is a unit operation of practically universal importance, but it is a physical separation process and not a chemical reaction. Distillation
Distillation
has many applications
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Liberty Village
Liberty Village
Liberty Village
is a neighbourhood in Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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Yaletown
Yaletown
Yaletown
is an area of Downtown Vancouver
Vancouver
approximately bordered by False Creek
False Creek
and by Robson and Homer Streets. Formerly a heavy industrial area dominated by warehouses and rail yards, since the Expo 86 it has been transformed into one of the most densely populated neighbourhoods in the city. The marinas, parks, high rise apartment blocks, and converted heritage buildings constitute one of the most significant urban regeneration projects in North America.[citation needed]Contents1 History 2 Planning and architecture 3 Transportation 4 Education 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit]Yaletown, as seen from David Lam ParkAs with much of Vancouver, the Canadian Pacific Railway
Canadian Pacific Railway
had a huge influence on the shaping of Yaletown
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Tate Gallery
Tate
Tate
is an institution that houses the United Kingdom's national collection of British art, and international modern and contemporary art. It is a network of five art museums: Tate
Tate
Britain, London (until 2000 known as the Tate
Tate
Gallery, founded 1897), Tate Liverpool
Tate Liverpool
(founded 1988), Tate
Tate
St Ives, Cornwall
Cornwall
(founded 1993), Tate
Tate
Contemporary (founded 2001) and Tate
Tate
Modern, London (founded 2000), with a complementary website, Tate
Tate
Online (created 1998)
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Gentrification
Gentrification
Gentrification
is a process of renovation of deteriorated urban neighborhoods by means of the influx of more affluent residents.[1][2] This is a common and controversial topic in politics and in urban planning. Gentrification
Gentrification
can improve the quality of a neighborhood, while also potentially forcing relocation of current, established residents and businesses, causing them to move from a gentrified area, seeking lower cost housing and stores. Gentrification
Gentrification
often shifts a neighborhood’s racial/ethnic composition and average household income by developing new, more expensive housing, businesses and improved resources.[3] Conversations about gentrification have evolved, as many in the social-scientific community have questioned the negative connotations associated with the word gentrification
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Greater Sudbury
705–207, 222, 280, 396, 397, 479, 507, 521, 522, 523, 524, 525, 546, 547, 550, 551, 552, 553, 554, 556, 560, 561, 562, 564, 566, 585, 596, 618, 626, 662, 664, 665, 669, 670, 671, 673, 674, 675, 677, 682, 688, 690, 691, 692, 693, 694, 695, 698, 699, 805, 853, 855, 858, 866, 867, 897, 898, 899, 919, 920, 929, 966, 967, 969, 983 249-810, 878Highways Highway 17 / TCH Highway 69 / TCH Highway 144Website www.greatersudbury.caGreater Sudbury, commonly referred to as Sudbury, is a city in Ontario, Canada. It is the largest city in Northern Ontario
Ontario
by population, with a population of 161,531 at the Canada 2016 Census.[3] By land area, it is the largest city in Ontario
Ontario
and the seventh largest municipality by area in Canada
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Regina's Historic Buildings And Precincts
Many historically significant buildings in Regina, Saskatchewan were lost during the period 1945 through approximately 1970 when the urge to "modernize" overtook developers' and city planners' sense of history and heritage. The old warehouse district to the north of the old CPR tracks was Regina's original commercial raison d'être once Lieutenant-Governor Edgar Dewdney had established the site of his considerable landholdings as the Territorial Capital.[1] With the significant conversion of shipping of commercial goods from train to truck and cancellation of passenger service on the railway, the Warehouse District immediately adjacent to the train line has ceased to be exclusively industrial in character
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NSCAD University
Coordinates: 44°38′58.02″N 63°34′26.23″W / 44.6494500°N 63.5739528°W / 44.6494500; -63.5739528NSCAD UniversityMotto Head, Heart, and HandType PublicEstablished 1887 (1887)President Dianne Taylor-GearingAcademic staff85 (regular staff)Students 632[1]Undergraduates 598[1]Postgraduates 34[1]Location Halifax, Nova ScotiaCampus UrbanColours Purple      and green     Affiliations UACC, CBIE, AICADWebsite nscad.caNSCAD University, formerly and still unofficially called the Nova Scotia College of Art
Art
and Design, is a post-secondary art school in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
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Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
Sault Ste. Marie (/ˈsuː seɪnt məˈriː/ "Soo Saint Marie") is a city on the St. Marys River in Ontario, Canada, close to the US-Canada border. It is the seat of the Algoma District
Algoma District
and the third largest city in Northern Ontario, after Sudbury and Thunder Bay. To the south, across the river, is the United States
United States
and the city of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. These two communities were one city until a new treaty after the War of 1812
War of 1812
established the border between Canada
Canada
and the United States
United States
in this area at the St. Mary's River
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CFB Cornwallis
Canadian Forces Base Cornwallis (also CFB Cornwallis) is a former Canadian Forces Base located in Deep Brook, Nova Scotia. It is situated in the western part of Annapolis County on the southern shore of the Annapolis Basin
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Business Park
A business park or office park is an area of land in which many office buildings are grouped together. All of the work that goes on is commercial, not large-scale industrial nor residential.[citation needed] The first office park opened in Mountain Brook, Alabama, in the early 1950s to avoid racial tension in city centers.[1] These are popular in many suburban locations, where development is cheaper because of the lower land costs and the lower building costs for building wider, not necessarily higher. Some businesses prefer the larger floorplates as more efficient, reducing time lost moving between floors
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Industry
Industry
Industry
is the production of goods or related services within an economy.[1] The major source of revenue of a group or company is the indicator of its relevant industry.[2] When a large group has multiple sources of revenue generation, it is considered to be working in different industries. Manufacturing
Manufacturing
industry became a key sector of production and labour in European and North American countries during the Industrial Revolution, upsetting previous mercantile and feudal economies
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