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Adams æbler
Adam's Apples
Adam's Apples
(Danish: Adams Æbler) is a 2005 Danish black comedy-drama film directed and written by Anders Thomas Jensen. The film revolves around the theme of the Book of Job. The main roles are played by Ulrich Thomsen
Ulrich Thomsen
and Mads Mikkelsen.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Reception 4 External links 5 ReferencesPlot[edit] Neo-Nazi gang leader Adam (Ulrich Thomsen) is granted parole from prison for participating in a rehabilitation program, where he joins the aggressive Saudi gas station robber Khalid (Ali Kazim) and the kleptomanic rapist Gunnar (Nicolas Bro). The community is headed by the priest Ivan (Mads Mikkelsen), who believes firmly and blindly in the goodness of man, and is seemingly oblivious to the ongoing misconduct and aggression of his charges. Ivan tells Adam to choose a goal for himself to complete his rehabilitation. Trying to mock the priest, Adam chooses the goal of baking an apple pie
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Adam's Apple (other)
An adam's apple, or laryngeal prominence, is a protrusion in the front of the throat. Adam's apple
Adam's apple
may also refer to:Adam's Apple (film), a 1928 British comedy film Adam's Apples, a 2005 Danish film Adam's Apple (album), a 1966 album by Wayne Shorter Adam's Apple (horse), a British Thoroughbred racehorse Adam's Apple (song), a 1975 song by Aerosmith Adams Apples, a Ghanaian film series, directed by Shirley Frimpong Manso Adam's apple, a variety of Lumia (citrus)See also[edit]Forbidden fruitDisambiguation page providing links to articles with similar titles This disambiguat
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A Serious Man
A Serious Man is a 2009 black comedy-drama film[2] written, produced, edited and directed by Joel and Ethan Coen. The film stars Michael Stuhlbarg as a Minnesota Jewish
Jewish
man whose life crumbles both professionally and personally, leading him to questions about his faith. The film attracted a positive critical response, including a Golden Globe nomination for Stuhlbarg, a place on both the American Film Institute's and National Board of Review's Top 10 Film Lists of 2009, and a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Picture.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Production 4 Soundtrack 5 Release5.1 Box office 5.2 Critical response 5.3 Accolades6 References 7 External linksPlot[edit] In a prologue, a Jewish
Jewish
man in an unnamed 19th-century Eastern European shtetl tells his wife that he was helped on his way home by Reb Groshkover, whom he has invited in for soup
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Elihu (Job)
Elihu (Hebrew: אֱלִיהוּא‎ ’Ělîhū) is a man in the Hebrew Bible's Book of Job. He is said to have descended from Buz who may be from the line of Abraham
Abraham
(Genesis 22:20-21 mentions Buz as a nephew of Abraham).Contents1 Synopsis of Elihu's Monologues 2 Possible pseudonymity of the character 3 Possible authorship 4 ReferencesSynopsis of Elihu's Monologues[edit] He is mentioned late in the text (chapter 32), and opens his discourse with more modesty than displayed by the other antagonists. Elihu differs from the others in that his monologues discuss divine providence, which he insists are full of wisdom and mercy. He claims that the righteous have their share of prosperity in this life, no less than the wicked. He teaches that God is supreme, and that one must acknowledge and submit to that supremacy because of God's wisdom. He draws instances of benignity from, for example, the constant wonders of creation and of the seasons
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Zophar
In the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Book of Job, Zophar or Tzofar (צוֹפַר "Chirping; rising early", Standard Hebrew Tsofar, Tiberian Hebrew Ṣôp̄ar) the Naamathite is one of the three friends of Job who visits to comfort him during his illness. His comments can be found in Job chapter 11 and 20. He suggests that Job's suffering could be divine punishment, and goes into great detail about the consequences of living a life of sin. Speeches[edit] Unlike friends Bildad and Eliphaz, Zophar only speaks twice to Job. He is the most impetuous and dogmatic of the three
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Eliphaz (Job)
Eliphaz (Hebrew: אֱלִיפָז‎ ’Ělîp̄āz, "El is pure gold")[1] is called a Temanite (Job 4:1). He appears in the Book of Job in the Hebrew Bible. Eliphaz appears mild and modest. In his first reply to Job's complaints, he argues that those who are truly good are never entirely forsaken by Providence, but that punishment may justly be inflicted for secret sins. He denies that any man is innocent and censures Job for asserting his freedom from guilt. Eliphaz exhorts Job to confess any concealed iniquities to alleviate his punishment. His arguments are well supported but God declares at the end of the book that Eliphaz has made a serious error in his speaking.[2] Job offers a sacrifice to God for Eliphaz's error.[3] Eliphaz, the first of the three visitors of Job (Job 2:11), was supposed to have come from Teman, an important city of Edom
Edom
(Amos 1:12; Obadiah 9; Jeremiah 44:20)
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Behemoth
Behemoth
Behemoth
(/bɪˈhiːməθ, ˈbiːə-, ˈbeɪəmɒθ/; Hebrew: בהמות‎, behemoth (modern: behemot)) is a beast mentioned in Job 40:15–24. Suggested identities range from a mythological creature to an elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or buffalo.[1] Some Young Earth creationists believe it to be a description of a dinosaur[citation needed]
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Jobab Ben Zerah
Jobab ben Zerah was a king of ancient Edom, according to Genesis 36. He succeeded Bela ben Beor in the apparently elective kingship[citation needed] of the Edomites. He ruled from Bozrah. He was succeeded by Husham. Although Adam Clarke
Adam Clarke
maintains a different position, many notable Bible scholars[who?] identify Jobab with the biblical figure Job. A book by David J
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Leviathan
Leviathan
Leviathan
(/lɪˈvaɪ.əθən/; Hebrew: לִוְיָתָן‬, Modern Livyatan, Tiberian Liwyāṯān) is a sea monster referenced in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
in the Book
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Rahab (Egypt)
Rahab
Rahab
m.n. (Hebrew: רַהַב‬, Modern Rahav, Tiberian Rahaḇ, "blusterer" is used in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
to indicate rage, fierceness, insolence, pride.[1]) Rahab
Rahab
is the emblematic name of Egypt
Egypt
and is also used for the sea.[2] In medieval Jewish folklore, Rahab
Rahab
is a mythical sea monster.Contents1 Biblical usage1.1 Egypt 1.2 Creation narratives in Biblical texts2 Rahab
Rahab
as insolence or pride 3 Jewish folklore 4 Influence4.1 Astronomy 4.2 Military 4.3 Video-games5 See also 6 References 7 External linksBiblical usage[edit] Egypt[edit] Rahab
Rahab
is a poetical name for Egypt. It might have Egyptian origins that were accommodated to the Hebrew
Hebrew
language
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Ziz
The Ziz
Ziz
(Hebrew: זיז‬) is a giant griffin-like bird in Jewish mythology, said to be large enough to be able to block out the sun with its wingspan. Description[edit] It is considered a giant animal/monster corresponding to archetypal creatures
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Testament Of Job
The Testament of Job
Testament of Job
is a book written in the 1st century BC or the 1st century AD (thus part of a tradition often called "intertestamental literature" by Christian scholars). The earliest surviving manuscript is in Coptic, of the 5th century; other early surviving manuscripts are in Greek and Old Slavonic. In folktale manner in the style of Jewish aggada [1], it elaborates upon the Book of Job
Book of Job
making Job a king in Egypt. Like many other Testament of ... works in the Old Testament apocrypha, it gives the narrative a framing-tale of Job's last illness, in which he calls together his sons and daughters to give them his final instructions and exhortations
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The Reverend (film)
The Reverend is a 2011 horror film directed by Neil Jones.[1] It had its world premiere on October 7, 2011 at the Grimm Up North Film Festival and received a DVD release on February 11, 2014 through Level 33.[2] The story is a very loose retelling of the Book of Job.[3] The film had a predominantly negative reception.Contents1 Synopsis 2 Cast 3 Reception 4 References 5 External linksSynopsis[edit] An eager and nameless new priest (Stuart Brennan) is sent to a small village to serve as their resident priest, but he is unaware that he is the basis of a bet between the Almighty (Giovanni Lombardo Radice) and the Withstander (Rutger Hauer ), with his soul as the prize. This bet is put into action when he is turned into a vampire
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Leviathan (2014 Film)
Leviathan
Leviathan
(Russian: Левиафан, Leviafan) is a 2014 Russian tragedy[4][5] film directed by Andrey Zvyagintsev, co-written by Zvyagintsev and Oleg Negin, and starring Aleksei Serebryakov, Elena Lyadova, and Vladimir Vdovichenkov
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Keren-happuch
Keren-happuch (Hebrew: קֶרֶן הַפּוּךְ‎, Hebrew pronunciation: [ˈqeren hapˈpux], "Horn of kohl") was the youngest of the three beautiful daughters of Job, named in the Bible as given to him in the later part of his life, after God made Job prosperous again. Keren-happuch's older sisters are named as Jemima and Keziah (Job 42:14). Job's sons, in contrast, are not named. Keren-happuch, along with her sisters, was described as more beautiful than all the other women in the land. Also, unusually and in common with her sisters, Keren-happuch was granted an inheritance by her father, with her brothers as might have been expected (Job 42-15). Apart from these brief references at the end of the Book of Job, she is not mentioned elsewhere in the Bible. Peter Bloomfield suggests that the beauty of his daughters "underscores Job's complete recovery
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Answer To Job
Answer to Job (German: Antwort auf Hiob) is a 1952 book by Carl Gustav Jung that addresses the moral, mythological and psychological implications of the Book of Job. It was first published in English in 1954.Contents1 Summary 2 Reception 3 Editions3.1 English translation4 References 5 Literature 6 External linksSummary[edit]This section possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed. (May 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Jung considers the Book of Job
Book of Job
a landmark development in the "divine drama", for the first time contemplating criticism of God (Gotteskritik). Jung described Answer to Job as "pure poison", referring to the controversial nature of the book (Storr, 1973). He did, however, feel an urge to write the book
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