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Adam Of Bremen
Adam of Bremen
Bremen
(Latin: Adamus Bremensis; German: Adam von Bremen) was a German medieval chronicler. He lived and worked in the second half of the eleventh century. He is most famous for his chronicle Gesta Hammaburgensis Ecclesiae Pontificum (Deeds of Bishops of the Hamburg Church). Little is known of his life other than hints from his own chronicles. He is believed to have come from Meissen
Meissen
( Latin
Latin
Misnia) in Saxony.[1] The dates of his birth and death are uncertain, but he was probably born before 1050 and died on 12 October of an unknown year (possibly 1081, at the latest 1085). From his chronicles it is apparent that he was familiar with a number of authors. The honorary name of Magister Adam shows that he had passed through all the stages of a higher education
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Facsimile
A facsimile (from Latin
Latin
fac simile (to 'make alike'), a spelling that remained in currency until the late 19th century) is a copy or reproduction of an old book, manuscript, map, art print, or other item of historical value that is as true to the original source as possible. It differs from other forms of reproduction by attempting to replicate the source as accurately as possible in scale, color, condition, and other material qualities. For books and manuscripts, this also entails a complete copy of all pages; hence, an incomplete copy is a "partial facsimile". Facsimiles are sometimes used by scholars to research a source that they do not have access to otherwise, and by museums and archives for media preservation and conservation. Many are sold commercially, often accompanied by a volume of commentary. They may be produced in limited editions, typically of 500–2,000 copies, and cost the equivalent of a few thousand United States dollars
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Magnum Opus
Masterpiece, magnum opus (Latin, great work) or chef-d’œuvre (French, master of work, plural chefs-d’œuvre) in modern use is a creation that has been given much critical praise, especially one that is considered the greatest work of a person's career or to a work of outstanding creativity, skill, profundity, or workmanship. Historically, a "masterpiece"' was a work of a very high standard produced to obtain membership of a guild or academy in various areas of the visual arts and crafts.Federico Zuccari, Two Painter's Apprentices, 1609
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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National Library Of The Czech Republic
6,919,075 total items[1] 21,204 manuscripts[1] c. 4,200 incunabula[2]Other informationDirector Martin KocandaWebsite www.nkp.czThe National Library of the Czech Republic
Czech Republic
(Czech: Národní knihovna České republiky) is the central library of the Czech Republic. It is directed by the Ministry of Culture. The library's main building is located in the historical Clementinum
Clementinum
building in Prague, where approximately half of its books are kept. The other half of the collection is stored in the district of Hostivař.[3] The National Library is the biggest library in the Czech Republic, in its funds there are around 6 million documents. The library has around 60,000 registered readers
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Bibliothèque Nationale De France
The Bibliothèque nationale de France
France
(BnF, English: National Library of France"; French: [bi.bli.jɔ.tɛk na.sjɔ.nal də fʁɑ̃s]) is the national library of France, located in Paris. It is the national repository of all that is published in France
France
and also holds extensive historical collections.Contents1 History 2 New buildings 3 Mission 4 Manuscript
Manuscript
collection 5 Digital library 6 List of directors6.1 1369–1792 6.2 1792–present7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit]See also: History of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (fr)The National Library of France
France
traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace
Louvre Palace
by Charles V in 1368
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Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
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LIBRIS
LIBRIS (Library Information System) is a Swedish national union catalogue maintained by the National Library of Sweden
Sweden
in Stockholm.[1] It is possible to freely search about 6.5 million titles nationwide.[2] In addition to bibliographic records, one for each book or publication, LIBRIS also contains an authority file of people
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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German National Library
The German National Library
German National Library
(German: Deutsche Nationalbibliothek or DNB) is the central archival library and national bibliographic centre for the Federal Republic of Germany. Its task is to collect, permanently archive, comprehensively document and record bibliographically all German and German-language
German-language
publications since 1913, foreign publications about Germany, translations of German works, and the works of German-speaking emigrants published abroad between 1933 and 1945, and to make them available to the public.[2] The German National Library
German National Library
maintains co-operative external relations on a national and international level. For example, it is the leading partner in developing and maintaining bibliographic rules and standards in Germany
Germany
and plays a significant role in the development of international library standards
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Wikisource
Wikisource
Wikisource
is an online digital library of free content textual sources on a wiki, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation. Wikisource
Wikisource
is the name of the project as a whole and the name for each instance of that project (each instance usually representing a different language); multiple Wikisources make up the overall project of Wikisource. The project's aims are to host all forms of free text, in many languages, and translations. Originally conceived as an archive to store useful or important historical texts (its first text was the Déclaration universelle des Droits de l'Homme), it has expanded to become a general-content library. The project officially began in November 24, 2003 under the name Project Sourceberg, a play on the famous Project Gutenberg. The name Wikisource
Wikisource
was adopted later that year and it received its own domain name seven months later
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Øresund
Coordinates: 55°45′N 12°45′E / 55.750°N 12.750°E / 55.750; 12.750Øresund, showing its northern and southern boundaries Denmark
Denmark
(Zealand) seen from the Swedish (Scania) side of Øresund Øresund
Øresund
or Öresund (Danish: Øresund, pronounced [ˈøːɐsɔnˀ]; Swedish: Öresund, pronounced [œrɛˈsɵnːd]),[1] commonly known in English as the Sound,[2] is a strait which forms the Danish–Swedish border, separating Zealand
Zealand
(Denmark) from Scania
Scania
(Sweden). The strait has a length of 118 kilometres (73 mi) and the width varies from 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) to 28 kilometres (17 mi)
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Northern Germany
Northern Germany
Germany
(German: Norddeutschland) is the region in the north of Germany. Its exact area is not precisely or consistently defined but varies depending on whether one is taking a linguistic, geographic, socio-cultural or historic standpoint.Contents1 Language 2 Geography 3 Culture 4 Cuisine 5 History 6 Northern German States 7 Major cities 8 See also 9 ReferencesLanguage[edit]Uerdingen line: ich ("I") and ik isoglossNorthern Germany
Germany
generally refers to the Sprachraum area north of the Uerdingen and Benrath line
Benrath line
isoglosses, where Low German
Low German
dialects are spoken
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Hamburg
Hamburg
Hamburg
(English: /ˈhæmbɜːrɡ/; German: [ˈhambʊɐ̯k] ( listen); locally: [ˈhambʊɪ̯ç] ( listen)), Low German/Low Saxon: Hamborg [ˈhambɔːç] ( listen), officially the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg
Hamburg
(German: Freie und Hansestadt Hamburg),[5] is the second-largest city of Germany
Germany
as well as one of the country's 16 constituent states, with a population of roughly 1.8 million people. The city lies at the core of the Hamburg Metropolitan Region
Hamburg Metropolitan Region
which spreads across four German federal states and is home to more than 5 million people. The official name reflects Hamburg's history as a member of the medieval Hanseatic League, a free imperial city of the Holy Roman Empire, a city-state and one of the 16 states of Germany. Before the 1871 Unification of Germany, it was a fully sovereign state
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Bremen
The City Municipality of Bremen
Bremen
(German: Stadtgemeinde Bremen, IPA: [ˈbʁeːmən] ( listen)) is a Hanseatic city in northwestern Germany, which belongs to the Free Hanseatic City of Bremen
Bremen
(also called just "Bremen" for short), a federal state of Germany. As a commercial and industrial city with a major port on the River Weser, Bremen
Bremen
is part of the Bremen/ Oldenburg
Oldenburg
Metropolitan Region, with 2.4 million people. Bremen
Bremen
is the second most populous city in Northern Germany
Germany
and eleventh in Germany.[3] Bremen
Bremen
is a major cultural and economic hub in the northern regions of Germany
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