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Adad
Hadad (Ugaritic: 𐎅𐎄 Haddu), Adad, Haddad (Akkadian) or Iškur (Sumerian) was the storm and rain god in the Northwest Semitic and ancient Mesopotamian religions. He was attested in Ebla as "Hadda" in c. 2500 BCE. From the Levant, Hadad was introduced to Mesopotamia by the Amorites, where he became known as the Akkadian (Assyrian-Babylonian) god Adad. Adad and Iškur are usually written with the logogram 𒀭𒅎 d--->IM—the same symbol used for the Hurrian god Teshub. Hadad was also called "Pidar", "Rapiu", "Baal-Zephon", or often simply Baʿal (Lord), but this title was also used for other gods. The bull was the symbolic animal of Hadad
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Haddad
Haddad or Hadad (Aramaic: ܚܕܕ, Hebrew: חדד‬) is an ancient Middle Eastern family name originating in Aramaic. Hadad was also a Semitic storm-god. The original Haddad (Aramaic: ܚܕܕ or ܚܕܐܕ) surname means blacksmith in Semitic languages. It is commonly used in the Canaan region and in Algeria. In the Aramaic-Turoyo dialect, the Haddads are also known as "Hadodo ܚܕܕܐ". People with the surname Hadodo, are usually Arameans from Tur Abdin
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Al-Lat
Allat, also spelled Allatu, Alilat, Allāt, and al-Lāt (Arabic: اللات‎  pronounced [al(i)ˈlaːt(u)]) was the name and title of multiple goddesses worshipped in pre-Islamic Arabia, including the one in
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Osiris
Osiris (/ˈsrɪs/, from Egyptian wsjr, Coptic ⲟⲩⲥⲓⲣⲉ) is an Egyptian god, identified as the god of the afterlife, the underworld, and the dead, but more appropriately as the god of transition, resurrection, and regeneration. He was classically depicted as a green-skinned deity with a pharaoh's beard, partially mummy-wrapped at the legs, wearing a distinctive crown with two large ostrich feathers at either side, and holding a symbolic crook and flail
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Ptah
In Egyptian mythology, Ptah (/pəˈtɑː/; Ancient Egyptian: ptḥ, probably vocalized as Pitaḥ in ancient Egyptian) is the demiurge of Memphis, god of craftsmen and architects. In the triad of Memphis, he is the spouse of Sekhmet and the father of Nefertum
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Ra
Ra (/rɑː/; Ancient Egyptian: rꜥ or ; also transliterated rˤw; cuneiform: 𒊑𒀀 ri-a or 𒊑𒅀ri-ia) or Re (/r/; Coptic: ⲣⲏ, ) is the ancient Egyptian sun god. By the Fifth Dynasty in the 25th and 24th centuries BC, he had become a major god in ancient Egyptian religion, identified primarily with the noon sun. In later Egyptian dynastic times, Ra was merged with the god Horus, as Ra-Horakhty ("Ra, who is Horus of the Two Horizons"). He was believed to rule in all parts of the created world: the sky, the earth, and the underworld. He was associated with the falcon or hawk. When in the New Kingdom the god Amun rose to prominence he was fused with Ra as Amun-Ra
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Set (deity)
Set /sɛt/ or Seth /sɛθ/ (Egyptian: stẖ; also transliterated Setesh, Sutekh, Setekh, or Suty) is a god of the desert, storms, disorder, violence, and foreigners in ancient Egyptian religion. In Ancient Greek, the god's name is given as Sēth (Σήθ). Set had a positive role where he accompanies Ra on his solar boat to repel Apep, the serpent of Chaos. Set had a vital role as a reconciled combatant. He was lord of the red (desert) land where he was the balance to Horus' role as lord of the black (soil) land. In Egyptian mythology, Set is portrayed as the usurper who killed and mutilated his own brother Osiris. Osiris' wife Isis reassembled (remembered) Osiris' corpse and resurrected him long enough to conceive his son and heir Horus. Horus sought revenge upon Set, and the myths describe their conflicts
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Shu (Egyptian God)
Shu (Egyptian for "emptiness" and "he who rises up") was one of the primordial Egyptian gods, a personification of air, spouse and counterpart to goddess Tefnut and one of the nine deities of the Ennead of the Heliopolis cosmogony.

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Tefnut
Tefnut (Ancient Egyptian: tfn.t) is a goddess of moisture, moist air, dew and rain in Ancient Egyptian religion. She is the sister and consort of the air god Shu and the mother of Geb and Nut.

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Thoth
Thoth (/θθ, tt/; from Greek Θώθ thṓth; derived from Egyptian ḏḥw.ty) was one of the deities of the Egyptian pantheon. In art, he was often depicted as a man with the head of an ibis or a baboon, animals sacred to him. His feminine counterpart was Seshat, and his wife was Ma'at. Thoth's chief temple was located in the city of Khmun, later called Hermopolis Magna during the Greco-Roman era (in reference to him through the Greeks' interpretation that he was the same as their god Hermes) and ϣⲙⲟⲩⲛⲉⲓⲛ Shmounein in the Coptic rendering. Khmun was partially destroyed in 1826 CE. In that city, he led the Ogdoad pantheon of eight principal deities
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Al-‘Uzzá
Al-ʻUzzā (Arabic: العزىal-ʻUzzā [al ʕuzzaː]) was one of the three chief goddesses of Arabian religion in pre-Islamic times and was worshiped by the pre-Islamic Arabs along with Allāt and Manāt. The Nabataeans equated her with the Greek goddess Aphrodite Ourania (Roman Venus Caelestis). A stone cube at aṭ-Ṭā’if (near Mecca) was held sacred as part of her cult. She is mentioned in the Qur'an Sura 53:19 as being one of the goddesses that people worshiped. Al-ʻUzzā, like Hubal, was called upon for protection by the pre-Islamic Quraysh
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Attar (god)
ʿAṯtar is an ancient Semitic deity whose role, name, and even gender varied by culture.