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Action Hero
The archetypal action hero or heroine is the protagonist of an action film or other entertainment which portrays action and adventure.[1] Other media in which such heroes appear include swashbuckler films, Westerns on television, old-time radio, adventure novels, dime novels, pulp magazines, and folklore.Contents1 See also 2 Notes 3 Further reading 4 External linksSee also[edit]Anandalok Best Action Hero
Hero
AwardNotes[edit]^ Barna William Donovan (2010), Blood, guns, and testosterone: action films, audiences, and a thirst for violence, Scarecrow Press, ISBN 9780810872622 Further reading[edit]Osgerby, Bill, Anna Gough-Yates, and Marianne Wells. Action TV : Tough-Guys, Smooth Operators and Foxy Chicks. London: Routledge, 2001. Tasker, Yvonne. Action and Adventure Cinema
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List Of Female Action Heroes
The following is a list of female action heroes and villains who appear in action films, television shows, comic books, and video games and who are "thrust into a series of challenges requiring physical feats, extended fights, extensive stunts and frenetic chases."[1] Elizabeth Abele suggests that "the key agency of female action protagonists is their ability to draw on the full range of masculine and feminine qualities in ever-evolving combinations."[2]Contents1 Films1.1 Animated theatrical films 1.2 Live-action theatrical films1.2.1 Films based on comic books 1.2.2 Films based on novels 1.2.3 Films based on video games2 Literature2.1 Literary villains3 Television3.1 Animated television series 3.2 Commercials4 Video games 5 ReferencesFilms[edit] Animated theatrical films[edit]Elastigirl from The Incredibles (2004)[3][4] Iria from Iria: Zeiram the Animation[5] Ahsoka Tano from Star Wars: The Clone Wars Merida
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Adventure Novel
Adventure fiction
Adventure fiction
is fiction that usually presents danger, or gives the reader a sense of excitement.Contents1 History 2 For children 3 See also 4 NotesHistory[edit] In the Introduction to the Encyclopedia of Adventure Fiction, Critic Don D'Ammassa defines the genre as follows:.. An adventure is an event or series of events that happens outside the course of the protagonist's ordinary life, usually accompanied by danger, often by physical action
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Sylvester Stallone
Michael Sylvester Gardenzio Stallone[2][3] (/stəˈloʊn/; born July 6, 1946)[4] is an American actor and filmmaker. He is well known for his Hollywood
Hollywood
action roles, including boxer Rocky Balboa
Rocky Balboa
in the Rocky series' seven films from 1976 to 2015; soldier John Rambo
John Rambo
in the four Rambo films, released between 1982 and 2008; and Barney Ross in the three The Expendables films from 2010 to 2014. He wrote or co-wrote most of the 14 films in all three franchises, and directed many of the films. Stallone's film Rocky
Rocky
was inducted into the National Film Registry, and had its props placed in the Smithsonian Museum
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Pirates In Popular Culture
In English-speaking popular culture, the modern pirate stereotype owes its attributes mostly to the imagined tradition of the 18th century Caribbean
Caribbean
pirate sailing off the Spanish Main
Spanish Main
and to such celebrated 20th century depictions as Captain Hook
Captain Hook
and his crew in the theatrical and film versions of Peter Pan, Robert Newton's portrayal of Long John Silver in the 1950 film of Treasure
Treasure
Island, and various adaptations of the Eastern pirate, Sinbad the Sailor
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The Washington Post
The Washington Post
The Washington Post
is an American daily newspaper. Published in Washington, D.C., it was founded on December 6, 1877.[7] Located in the capital city of the United States, the newspaper has a particular emphasis on national politics. The newspaper's slogan states, "Democracy dies in darkness". Daily editions are printed for the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. It is published as a broadsheet. The newspaper has won 47 Pulitzer Prizes. This includes six separate Pulitzers awarded in 2008, second only to The New York Times' seven awards in 2002 for the highest number ever awarded to a single newspaper in one year.[8] Post journalists have also received 18 Nieman Fellowships and 368 White House
White House
News Photographers Association awards
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The Boston Globe
The Boston
Boston
Globe (sometimes abbreviated as The Globe) is an American daily newspaper founded and based in Boston, Massachusetts, since its creation by Charles H. Taylor in 1872. The newspaper has won a total of 26 Pulitzer Prizes as of 2016, and with a total paid circulation of 245,824 from September 2015 to August 2016,[3] it is the 25th most read newspaper in the United States. The Boston
Boston
Globe is the oldest and largest daily newspaper in Boston.[4] Founded in the later 19th century, the paper was mainly controlled by Irish Catholic
Irish Catholic
interests before being sold to Charles H. Taylor and his family. After being privately held until 1973, it was sold to The New York Times in 1993 for $1.1 billion, making it one of the most expensive print purchases in U.S
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Folklore
Folklore
Folklore
is the expressive body of culture shared by a particular group of people; it encompasses the traditions common to that culture, subculture or group. These include oral traditions such as tales, proverbs and jokes. They include material culture, ranging from traditional building styles to handmade toys common to the group. Folklore
Folklore
also includes customary lore, the forms and rituals of celebrations such as Christmas
Christmas
and weddings, folk dances and initiation rites. Each one of these, either singly or in combination, is considered a folklore artifact. Just as essential as the form, folklore also encompasses the transmission of these artifacts from one region to another or from one generation to the next
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Pulp Magazine
Pulp magazines
Pulp magazines
or Pulp Fiction
Pulp Fiction
(often referred to as "the pulps") were inexpensive fiction magazines that were published from 1896 to the 1950s. The term pulp derives from the cheap wood pulp paper on which the magazines were printed. In contrast, magazines printed on higher-quality paper were called "glossies" or "slicks". The typical pulp magazine had 128 pages; it was 7 inches (18 cm) wide by 10 inches (25 cm) high, and 0.5 inches (1.3 cm) thick, with ragged, untrimmed edges. The pulps gave rise to the term pulp fiction in reference to run-of-the-mill, low-quality literature. Pulps were the successors to the penny dreadfuls, dime novels, and short-fiction magazines of the 19th century. Although many respected writers wrote for pulps, the magazines were best known for their lurid, exploitative, and sensational subject matter
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Dime Novel
The dime novel is a form of late 19th-century and early 20th-century U.S. popular fiction issued in series of inexpensive paperbound editions
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Anandalok Best Action Hero Award
Here is a list of Anandalok Best Action Hero Award.Year Name Film Director Remarks/Note2008 Hiran Chatterjee Nabab Nandini Haranath Chakraborty2007 Anubhab Mohanty Kalisankar Prasanta NandaSee also[edit]Anandalok Awards Tollywood BanglaExternal links[edit]www.gomolo.in Anandalok Awards www.bollywoodhungama.co
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Old-time Radio
The old-time radio era, sometimes referred to as the Golden Age of Radio, was an era of radio programming in the United States during which radio was the dominant electronic home entertainment medium. It began with the birth of commercial radio broadcasting in the early 1920s and lasted until the 1950s, when television superseded radio as the medium of choice for scripted programming. The last few scripted radio dramas and full-service radio stations[further explanation needed] ended in 1962.[citation needed] During this period radio was the only broadcast medium, and people regularly tuned into their favorite radio programs, and families gathered to listen to the home radio in the evening. According to a 1947 C. E
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Swashbuckler Film
Swashbuckler
Swashbuckler
films are a subgenre of the action film genre, often characterised by swordfighting and adventurous heroic characters, known as swashbucklers. Real historical events often feature prominently in the plot, morality is often clear-cut, heroic characters are clearly heroic and even villains tend to have a code of honour (although this is not always the case). There is often a damsel in distress and a romantic element.Contents1 History 2 Swashbucklers 3 Fencing 4 Musical scores 5 Television 6 Notable films 7 Notable actors and actresses 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] Right from the advent of cinema, the silent era was packed with swashbucklers
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Jackie Chan
Chan Kong-sang, SBS,[1] MBE,[2] PMW[3] (陳港生; born 7 April 1954),[4] known professionally as Jackie Chan, is a Hong Kong
Hong Kong
martial artist, actor, film director, producer, stuntman, and singer. He is known for his acrobatic fighting style, comic timing, use of improvised weapons, and innovative stunts, which he typically performs himself, in the cinematic world. He has trained in wushu[disambiguation needed] or kungfu and Hapkido,[5][6] and has been acting since the 1960s, appearing in over 150 films. Chan is one of the most recognizable and influential cinematic personalities in the world, gaining a widespread following in both the Eastern and Western hemispheres, and has received stars on the Hong Kong Avenue of Stars, and the Hollywood Walk of Fame.[7][8] He has been referenced in various pop songs, cartoons, and video games
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