HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Acqui Terme
Acqui Terme
Acqui Terme
(Piemontese: Äich) is a city and comune of Piedmont, northern Italy, in the province of Alessandria. It is about 35 kilometres (22 mi) south-southwest of Alessandria. It is one of the principal winemaking communes of the Italian DOCG wine Brachetto d'Acqui.[1] The hot sulphur springs have been famous since this was the Roman town of Aquae Statiellae; the ancient baths are referred to by Paulus Diaconus and the chronicler Liutprand of Cremona.[2] In 1870 Giovanni Ceruti designed a little pavilion, known as La Bollente, for the spot at the centre of the town where the waters bubble up at 75 °C (167 °F).Contents1 History 2 Main sights 3 Twin towns — sister cities 4 Notable people 5 Gallery 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] In the Roman period the place was connected by road with Alba Pompeia and Augusta Taurinorum (Turin)
[...More...]

"Acqui Terme" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dolcetto
Dolcetto
Dolcetto
[dolˈtʃetto] is a black Italian wine
Italian wine
grape variety widely grown in the Piedmont region of northwest Italy
[...More...]

"Dolcetto" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bormida (river)
The Bormida (Bormia in Piedmontese language) is a river of north-west Italy. Geography[edit]Motivo sulla Bormida, Alfredo d'Andrade, 1865The Bormida which rises in Liguria
Liguria
near Colle Scravaion
Colle Scravaion
as Bormida di Millesimo and flows through Piedmont. After converging with the Bormida di Spigno
Bormida di Spigno
near Bistagno, it joins the Tanaro, of which it is the major tributary, north-east of Alessandria. References[edit] Media related to Bormida (river)
Bormida (river)
at Wikimedia Commons^ AA.VV. (2004). "Elaborato I.c/5". Piano di Tutela delle Acque - Revisione del 1º luglio 2004; Caratterizzazione bacini idrografici (PDF). Regione Piemonte. Retrieved 2016-01-10.  ^ a b AA.VV. (1 July 2004). "Elaborato I.c/7". Piano di Tutela delle Acque - Revisione del 1º luglio 2004; Caratterizzazione bacini idrografici (pdf). Regione Piemonte
[...More...]

"Bormida (river)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Italian Wine
Italy
Italy
is home to some of the oldest wine-producing regions in the world, and Italian wines are known worldwide for their broad variety. Italy, closely followed by Spain and France, is the world’s largest wine producer by volume. Its contribution is about 45–50 million hl per year, and represents about ⅓ of global production.[1] Italian wine is exported around the world and is also extremely popular in Italy: Italians
Italians
rank fifth on the world wine consumption list by volume with 42 litres per capita consumption. Grapes
Grapes
are grown in almost every region of the country and there are more than one million vineyards under cultivation. Etruscans
Etruscans
and Greek settlers produced wine in Italy
Italy
before the Romans started their own vineyards in the 2nd century BC
[...More...]

"Italian Wine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

33 Mountain Infantry Division Acqui
The 33rd Infantry
Infantry
Division Acqui (Italian: 33ª Divisione Acqui) was a mountain infantry Division of the Italian Army during World War II. The only difference between line infantry divisions and mountain infantry divisions was that the latter's artillery was carried by pack mules instead of the standard horse-drawn carriages. Italy's real mountain warfare divisions were the six alpine divisions manned by the "Alpini" mountain troops. The Acqui Division was formed in August 1939 from the parts of 14th and 11th infantry brigades, and mobilized for war in October 1939. It is notable for having been massacred with remarkable cruelty after surrendering to the Germans 21 September 1943
[...More...]

"33 Mountain Infantry Division Acqui" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Liutprand Of Cremona
Liutprand, also Liudprand, Liuprand, Lioutio, Liucius, Liuzo, and Lioutsios (c. 920 – 972),[1] was a historian, diplomat, and Bishop of Cremona born in what is now northern Italy, whose works are an important source for the politics of the 10th century Byzantine court.Contents1 Early life and career 2 Mission to Constantinople 3 Bishop of Cremona 4 Second mission to Constantinople 5 Works 6 Works in English translation 7 References 8 External linksEarly life and career[edit] Liutprand was born into a prominent family from Pavia, of Lombard origins, around 920. In 931 he entered service as page to Hugh of Arles, who kept court at Pavia
Pavia
as King of Italy
King of Italy
and who married the notorious and powerful Marozia of Rome. Liutprand was educated at the court and became a Deacon at the Cathedral of Pavia
[...More...]

"Liutprand Of Cremona" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Turin
Turin
Turin
(/tjʊəˈrɪn, ˈtʊərɪn/;[2] Italian: Torino [toˈriːno] ( listen); Piemontese: Turin
Turin
[tyˈɾiŋ])[3] is a city and an important business and cultural centre in northern Italy. It is the capital city of the Metropolitan City of Turin
Metropolitan City of Turin
(an administrative division of Italy) and of the Piedmont
Piedmont
region, and was the first capital city of Italy
Italy
from 1861 to 1865. The city is located mainly on the western bank of the Po River, in front of Susa Valley, and is surrounded by the western Alpine arch and Superga
Superga
Hill. The population of the city proper is 886,837 (31 December 2016) while the population of the urban area is estimated by Eurostat to be 1.7 million inhabitants
[...More...]

"Turin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ligures
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordic Bronze Age Terramare Tumulus
[...More...]

"Ligures" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Po River
The Po (/poʊ/; Latin: Padus and Eridanus; Italian: Po [pɔ]; ancient Ligurian: Bodincus or Bodencus; Ancient Greek: Πάδος, Ancient Greek: Ἠριδανός) is a river that flows eastward across northern Italy. The Po flows either 652 km (405 mi) or 682 km (424 mi) – considering the length of the Maira, a right bank tributary. The headwaters of the Po are a spring seeping from a stony hillside at Pian del Re, a flat place at the head of the Val Po
Val Po
under the northwest face of Monviso
Monviso
(in the Cottian Alps). The Po ends at a delta projecting into the Adriatic Sea
Adriatic Sea
near Venice
[...More...]

"Po River" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lombards
The Lombards
Lombards
or Longobards (Latin: Langobardi, Italian: Longobardi [loŋɡoˈbardi], Lombard: Longobard (Western)) were a Germanic people who ruled most of the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
from 568 to 774. The Lombard historian Paul the Deacon
Paul the Deacon
wrote in the Historia Langobardorum that the Lombards
Lombards
descended from a small tribe called the Winnili,[1] who dwelt in southern Scandinavia[2] (Scadanan) before migrating to seek new lands. In the 1st century AD, they formed part of the Suebi, in northwestern Germany. By the end of the 5th century, they had moved into the area roughly coinciding with modern Austria and Slovakia
Slovakia
north of the Danube
Danube
river, where they subdued the Heruls and later fought frequent wars with the Gepids
[...More...]

"Lombards" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Piemontese Language
Piedmontese (Piemontèis or Lenga Piemontèisa, in Italian: Piemontese) is a Romance language
Romance language
spoken some 700,000 people in Piedmont, northwestern region of Italy. It is geographically and linguistically included in the Gallo- Italic languages
Italic languages
group of Northern Italy
Italy
(with Lombard, Emiliano-Romagnolo
Emiliano-Romagnolo
and Ligurian)
[...More...]

"Piemontese Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Marquisate Of Montferrat
The March (also margraviate or marquisate) of Montferrat was a frontier march of the Kingdom of Italy during the Middle Ages and a state of the Holy Roman Empire. The margraviate was raised to become the Duchy of Montferrat in 1574. Originally part of the March of Western Liguria (Marca Liguriae Occidentalis) established by King Berengar II about 950, the area of Montferrat was constituted as the marca Aleramica ("Aleramic march") for his son-in-law Aleramo. The earliest secure documentation of Aleramo and his immediate family is derived from the founding charter of the Abbey of Grazzano in 961. occasioned by the recent death of Aleramo's son Gugliemo. After King Otto I of Germany had invaded Italy in 961 and displaced Berengar II, he began, in a manner much like his predecessors Berengar and Hugh of Arles, to redefine the great fiefs of Italy. He reorganised the northwest into three great marches
[...More...]

"Marquisate Of Montferrat" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Duchy Of Savoy
From 1416 to 1860, the Duchy of Savoy
Savoy
(French: Duché de Savoie, Italian: Ducato di Savoia) was a state in Western Europe. It was created when Sigismund, King of the Romans, raised the County of Savoy into a duchy for Amadeus VIII. The duchy was a subject of the Holy Roman Empire
Roman Empire
with a vote in the Imperial Diet. From the 16th century, Savoy
Savoy
belonged to the Upper Rhenish Circle
[...More...]

"Duchy Of Savoy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Romanesque Architecture
Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
is an architectural style of medieval Europe characterized by semi-circular arches. There is no consensus for the beginning date of the Romanesque style, with proposals ranging from the 6th to the 11th century, this later date being the most commonly held. It developed in the 12th century into the Gothic style, marked by pointed arches. Examples of Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
can be found across the continent, making it the first pan-European architectural style since Imperial Roman architecture. The Romanesque style in England is traditionally referred to as Norman architecture. Combining features of ancient Roman and Byzantine buildings and other local traditions, Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
is known by its massive quality, thick walls, round arches, sturdy pillars, barrel vaults, large towers and decorative arcading
[...More...]

"Romanesque Architecture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rose Window
A rose window or Catherine window is often used as a generic term applied to a circular window, but is especially used for those found in churches of the Gothic architectural style and being divided into segments by stone mullions and tracery. The name "rose window" was not used before the 17th century and according to the Oxford English Dictionary, among other authorities, comes from the English flower name rose.[1] The term "wheel window" is often applied to a window divided by simple spokes radiating from a central boss or opening, while the term "rose window" is reserved for those windows, sometimes of a highly complex design, which can be seen to bear similarity to a multi-petalled rose. Rose
Rose
windows are also called Catherine windows after Saint Catherine of Alexandria who was sentenced to be executed on a spiked wheel
[...More...]

"Rose Window" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gothic Architecture
Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
is an architectural style that flourished in Europe
Europe
during the High and Late Middle Ages. It evolved from Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
and was succeeded by Renaissance
Renaissance
architecture. Originating in 12th century France
France
and lasting into the 16th century, Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
was known during the period as Opus Francigenum ("French work") with the term Gothic first appearing during the later part of the Renaissance. Its characteristics include the pointed arch, the ribbed vault (which evolved from the joint vaulting of Romanesque architecture) and the flying buttress. Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
is most familiar as the architecture of many of the great cathedrals, abbeys and churches of Europe
[...More...]

"Gothic Architecture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.