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Acmonia
Acmonia or Akmonia (Ἀκμονία) is an ancient city and a titular see of Phrygia Pacatiana, in Asia Minor, now known as Ahat Köyü. It is mentioned by Cicero
Cicero
(Pro Flacco, 15) and was a point on the road between Dorylaeum
Dorylaeum
and Philadelphia.Contents1 Bishopric 2 Excavations 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBishopric[edit] Acmonia appears in the Notitiae Episcopatuum from the 10th to the 12th or 13th century. The first bishop whose name is known is Optimus, who was transferred to the metropolitan see of Antiochia in Pisidia before 381. Gennadius took part in the Council of Chalcedon
Council of Chalcedon
in 451. Theotimus signed in 459 the decree of Patriarch Gennadius I of Constantinople against the simoniacs. Paulus was at the Second Council of Nicaea
Second Council of Nicaea
in 787
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Patriarch Gennadius I Of Constantinople
Saint Gennadius (Greek: Άγιος Γεννάδιος) was the 21st Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople
Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople
(d. 25 August 471). Gennadius is known to have been a learned writer who followed the Antiochene school of literal exegesis, although few writings have been left about him. He is commemorated in the Orthodox Church
Orthodox Church
on November 17, but is not listed in the Roman Martyrology.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Biblical works 3 References 4 Further readingBiography[edit] His first public writing was quoted by Facundus (Defensio, II, iv) against Saint Cyril of Alexandria
Cyril of Alexandria
in two works, probably in 431 or 432, including a passage to show that his work was more violent even than the letter of Ibas. The Anathemas of Cyril and Two Books to Parthenius were criticized
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Titular See
A titular see in various churches is an episcopal see of a former diocese that no longer functions, sometimes called a "dead diocese". The ordinary or hierarch of such a see may be styled a "titular metropolitan" (highest rank), "titular archbishop" (intermediary rank) or "titular bishop" (lowest rank), which normally goes by the status conferred on the titular see. The term is used to signify a diocese that no longer functionally exists, often because the diocese once flourished but the territory was conquered by Muslims or no longer functions because of a schism. The Greek–Turkish population exchange of 1923 also contributed to titular bishoprics. The see of Maximianoupolis was destroyed along with the town that shared its name by the Bulgarians under Emperor Kaloyan in 1207; the town and the see were under the control of the Latin Empire, which took Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade
Fourth Crusade
in 1204
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Third Council Of Constantinople
The Third Council of Constantinople, counted as the Sixth Ecumenical Council[1] by the Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
and Catholic Churches, as well by certain other Western Churches, met in 680/681 and condemned monoenergism and monothelitism as heretical and defined Jesus Christ as having two energies and two wills (divine and human).[2]Contents1 Background 2 Preparations 3 Proceedings 4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksBackground[edit] Main article: Monothelitism The Council settled a set of theological controversies that go back to the sixth century but had intensified under the Emperors Heraclius (610–641) and Constans II
Constans II
(641–668)
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Council Of Constantinople (879)
The Fourth Council of Constantinople was held in 879–880. It confirmed the reinstatement of Photius as Patriarch of Constantinople. It has been accepted by handful Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
as an eighth Ecumenical Council.[1][Unreliable fringe source?]Contents1 Background 2 The Council of 879–880 3 Confirmation and further reception 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksBackground[edit] The Council settled the dispute that had broken out after the deposition of Ignatius as Patriarch of Constantinople in 858. Ignatius, himself appointed to his office in an uncanonical manner, opposed Caesar Bardas, who had deposed the regent Theodora. In response, Bardas' nephew, the youthful Emperor Michael III
Michael III
engineered Ignatius's deposition and confinement on the charge of treason. The patriarchal throne was filled with Photius, a renowned scholar and kinsman of Bardas
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Council Of Constantinople (869)
The Fourth Council of Constantinople
Constantinople
was the eighth Catholic Ecumenical Council held in Constantinople
Constantinople
from October 5, 869, to February 28, 870. It included 102 bishops, three papal legates, and four patriarchs.[1] The Council met in ten sessions from October 869 to February 870 and issued 27 canons. The council was called by Emperor Basil I
Basil I
the Macedonian and Pope Adrian II.[2] It deposed Photios, a layman who had been appointed as Patriarch of Constantinople, and reinstated his predecessor Ignatius. The Council also reaffirmed the decisions of the Second Council of Nicaea in support of icons and holy images and required the image of Christ to have veneration equal with that of the gospel book.[3] A later council, the Greek Fourth Council of Constantinople, was held after Photios had been reinstated on the order of the emperor
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Second Council Of Nicaea
The Second Council of Nicaea
Second Council of Nicaea
is recognized as the last of the first seven ecumenical councils by the Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
and the Roman Catholic Church. In addition, it is also recognized as such by the Old Catholics and others. Protestant opinions on it are varied. It met in AD 787 in Nicaea (site of the First Council of Nicaea; present-day İznik
İznik
in Turkey) to restore the use and veneration of icons (or, holy images),[1] which had been suppressed by imperial edict inside the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
during the reign of Leo III (717–741)
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Simony
Simony
Simony
/ˈsɪməni/ is the act of selling church offices and roles. It is named after Simon Magus,[1] who is described in the Acts of the Apostles 8:9–24 as having offered two disciples of Jesus, Peter and John, payment in exchange for their empowering him to impart the power of the Holy Spirit
Holy Spirit
to anyone on whom he would place his hands
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Council Of Chalcedon
The Council of Chalcedon
Chalcedon
(/kælˈsiːdən, ˈkælsɪdɒn/)[1] was a church council held from October 8 to November 1, AD 451, at Chalcedon. The council is numbered as the fourth ecumenical council by the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and most Protestants
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Catholic Encyclopedia
The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the Constitution, Doctrine, Discipline, and History of the Catholic Church,[1] also referred to as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia
Catholic Encyclopedia
and the Original Catholic Encyclopedia,[2] is an English-language encyclopedia published in the United States and designed to serve the Roman Catholic Church. The first volume appeared in March 1907 and the last three volumes appeared in 1912, followed by a master index volume in 1914 and later supplementary volumes. It was designed "to give its readers full and authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine".[3][4] The Catholic Encyclopedia
Catholic Encyclopedia
was published by the Robert Appleton Company (RAC), a publishing company incorporated at New York in February 1905 for the express purpose of publishing the encyclopedia
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Antioch Of Pisidia
Antioch
Antioch
in Pisidia
Pisidia
– alternatively Antiochia in Pisidia
Pisidia
or Pisidian Antioch
Antioch
(Greek: Ἀντιόχεια τῆς Πισιδίας) and in Roman Empire, Latin: Antiochia Caesareia or Antiochia Colonia Caesarea – is a city in the Turkish Lakes Region, which is at the crossroads of the Mediterranean, Aegean and Central Anatolian regions, and formerly on the border of Pisidia
Pisidia
and Phrygia, hence also known as Antiochia in Phrygia. The site lies approximately 1 km northeast of Yalvaç, the modern town of Isparta
Isparta
Province
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Metropolitan See
A metropolis or metropolitan archdiocese is a see or city whose bishop is the metropolitan of a province. Metropolises, historically, have been important cities in their provinces. In the Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Churches, a metropolis (also called metropolia or metropolitanate) is a type of diocese, along with eparchies, exarchates, and archdioceses. In the Churches of Greek Orthodoxy (Church of Greece, Greek Orthodox Archdiocese
Archdiocese
of America, etc.), every diocese is a metropolis, headed by a metropolitan: auxiliary bishops are the only non-metropolitan bishops
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Notitiae Episcopatuum
The Notitiae Episcopatuum (singular: Notitia Episcopatuum) are official documents that furnish Eastern countries the list and hierarchical rank of the metropolitan and suffragan bishoprics of a church. In the Roman Church (the -mostly Latin Rite- 'Western Patriarchate' of Rom), archbishops and bishops were classed according to the seniority of their consecration, and in Africa according to their age. In the Eastern patriarchates, however, the hierarchical rank of each bishop was determined by the see he occupied. Thus, in the Patriarchate of Constantinople, the first Metropolitan was not the longest ordained, but whoever happened to be the incumbent of the See of Caesarea; the second was the Archbishop
Archbishop
of Ephesus, and so on
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Alaşehir
Alaşehir
Alaşehir
(Turkish pronunciation: [aˈɫaʃehiɾ]), in Antiquity and the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
known as Philadelphia (Greek: Φιλαδέλφεια, i.e., "the city of him who loves his brother") is a town and district of Manisa Province
Manisa Province
in the Aegean region of Turkey. It is situated in the valley of the Kuzuçay (Cogamus in antiquity), at the foot of the Bozdağ Mountain (Mount Tmolus
Tmolus
in antiquity). The town is connected to İzmir
İzmir
by a 105 km (65 mi) railway. The longtime mayor is Gökhan Karaçoban. It stands on elevated ground commanding the extensive and fertile plain of the Gediz River
Gediz River
( Hermus in antiquity), presenting an imposing appearance when seen from a distance. It has ~45 mosques . There are small industries and a fair trade
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