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Acinonyx Jubatus Soemmeringii
Acinonyx
Acinonyx
jubatus megabalica (Heuglin), 1863 Acinonyx
Acinonyx
jubatus wagneri Hilzheimer, 1913The Northeast African cheetah
Northeast African cheetah
( Acinonyx
Acinonyx
jubatus soemmeringii) is a cheetah subspecies occurring in Northeast Africa
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East African Cheetah
African(s) may refer to:Anything from or pertaining to the continent of Africa:People who are native to Africa, descendants of natives of Africa, or individuals who trace their ancestry to indigenous inhabitants of AfricaEthnic groups of Africa African
African
diaspora African
African
cuisine African
African
culture African
African
languages African
African
music African
African
Art African
African
jazz (other)Contents1 Books and radio 2 Music 3 See alsoBooks and radio[edit]The African
African
(essay), a story by French author J. M. G
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Samuel Thomas Von Soemmerring
Samuel Thomas von Sömmerring (28 January 1755 – 2 March 1830) was a German physician, anatomist, anthropologist, paleontologist and inventor. Sömmerring discovered the macula in the retina of the human eye. His investigations on the brain and the nervous system, on the sensory organs, on the embryo and its malformations, on the structure of the lungs, etc., made him one of the most important German anatomists. Career[edit]Portrait by Karl ThelottSömmerring was born in Thorn, Royal Prussia (Toruń, Poland) as the ninth child of the physician Johann Thomas Sömmerring. In 1774 he completed his education in Thorn and began to study medicine at the University of Göttingen. He visited Petrus Camper lecturing at the University in Franeker. He became a professor of anatomy at the Collegium Carolinum (housed in the Ottoneum, now a Natural History Museum) in Kassel and, beginning in 1784, at the University of Mainz. There he was for five years the dean of the medical faculty
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Southern African Cheetah
Acinonyx jubatus guttata (Hermann, 1804) Acinonyx jubatus fearsoni (Smith, 1834) Acinonyx jubatus fearonis (Fitzinger, 1869) Acinonyx jubatus lanea (Sclater, 1877) Acinonyx jubatus obergi (Hilzheimer, 1913) Acinonyx jubatus ngorongorensis (Hilzheimer, 1913) Acinonyx jubatus raineyi (Heller, 1913) Acinonyx jubatus velox (Heller, 1913) Acinonyx jubatus rex (Pocock, 1927)The South African cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus jubatus), also known as the Namibian cheetah,[2] is the most numerous and the nominate cheetah subspecies native to Southern Africa. The Southern African cheetah lives mainly in the lowland areas and deserts of the Kalahari, the savannahs of Okavango Delta, and the grasslands of the Transvaal region in South Africa
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Sahara
The Sahara
Sahara
(Arabic: الصحراء الكبرى‎, aṣ-ṣaḥrāʼ al-kubrá, 'the Great Desert') is the largest hot desert and the third largest desert in the world after Antarctica
Antarctica
and the Arctic.[1] Its area of 9,200,000 square kilometres (3,600,000 sq mi)[2] is comparable to the area of China
China
or the United States. The name 'Sahara' is derived from dialectal Arabic word for "desert", ṣaḥra (صحرا /ˈsˤaħra/).[3][4][5][6] The desert comprises much of North Africa, excluding the fertile region on the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
coast, the Atlas Mountains
Atlas Mountains
of the Maghreb, and the Nile Valley
Nile Valley
in Egypt
Egypt
and Sudan
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Genetic Divergence
Genetic divergence is the process in which two or more populations of an ancestral species accumulate independent genetic changes (mutations) through time, often after the populations have become reproductively isolated for some period of time. In some cases, subpopulations living in ecologically distinct peripheral environments can exhibit genetic divergence from the remainder of a population, especially where the range of a population is very large (see parapatric speciation). The genetic differences among divergent populations can involve silent mutations (that have no effect on the phenotype) or give rise to significant morphological and/or physiological changes
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Ethiopian Empire
The Ethiopian Empire
Empire
(Amharic: የኢትዮጵያ ንጉሠ ነገሥት መንግሥተ, Mängəstä Ityop'p'ya), also known as Abyssinia (derived from the Arabic al-Habash),[10] was a kingdom that spanned a geographical area in the current state of Ethiopia
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Alfred Edmund Brehm
Alfred Edmund Brehm (German pronunciation: [ˈalfʁeːt ˈɛtmʊnt bʁeːm]) (2 February 1829 in Unterrenthendorf, now called Renthendorf – 11 November 1884 in Renthendorf) was a German zoologist, writer, director of zoological gardens and the son of Christian Ludwig Brehm, a famous pastor and ornithologist. Through the book title Brehms Tierleben, which he co-authored with Eduard Pechuël-Loesche, Wilhelm Haacke, and Richard Schmidtlein, his name became a household word for popular zoological literature.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Selected publications 4 External linksEarly life[edit] Alfred Brehm was brought up in the small Thuringian village Unterrenthendorf as the son of the minister Christian Ludwig Brehm and his second wife Bertha. Christian Ludwig Brehm made a name for himself as an ornithologist by publications and an extensive collection of stuffed birds
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Austria
Coordinates: 47°20′N 13°20′E / 47.333°N 13.333°E / 47.333; 13.333 Republic
Republic
of Austria Republik Österreich  (German)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: Land der Berge, Land am Strome  (German) Land of Mountains, Land by the RiverLocation of  Austria  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Vienna 48°12′N 16°21′E / 48.200°N 16.350°E / 48.200; 16.350Official languages German[a][b]
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Zoologist
Zoology
Zoology
(/zuːˈɒlədʒi, zoʊˈɒlədʒi/) or animal biology is the branch of biology that studies the animal kingdom, including the structure, embryology, evolution, classification, habits, and distribution of all animals, both living and extinct, and how they interact with their ecosystems. The term is derived from Ancient
Ancient
Greek ζῷον, zōion, i.e. "animal" and λόγος, logos, i.e. "knowledge, study".[1]Contents1 History1.1 Ancient
Ancient
history to Darwin 1.2 Post-Darwin2 Research2.1 Structural 2.2 Physiological 2.3 Evolutionary 2.4 Classification 2.5 Ethology 2.6 Biogeography3 Branches of zoology 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Ancient
Ancient
history to Darwin[edit] Conrad Gesner
Conrad Gesner
(1516–1565)
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Species Description
A species description is a formal description of a newly discovered species, usually in the form of a scientific paper. Its purpose is to give a clear description of a new species of organism and explain how it differs from species which have been described previously or are related. The species description often contains photographs or other illustrations of the type material and states in which museums it has been deposited. The publication in which the species is described gives the new species a formal scientific name. Today, some 1.9 million species have been described and named, out of some 8.7 million that may actually exist on Earth.[1] Millions more have become extinct. It is customary for scientists to introduce all relevant new findings and research in a scientific manuscript, which is sent to other scientists for peer review
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Scientific Name
Binomial nomenclature
Binomial nomenclature
("two-term naming system") also called binominal nomenclature ("two-name naming system") or binary nomenclature, is a formal system of naming species of living things by giving each a name composed of two parts, both of which use Latin
Latin
grammatical forms, although they can be based on words from other languages. Such a name is called a binomial name (which may be shortened to just "binomial"), a binomen, binominal name or a scientific name; more informally it is also called a Latin
Latin
name. The first part of the name identifies the genus to which the species belongs; the second part – the specific name or specific epithet – identifies the species within the genus. For example, humans belong to the genus Homo
Homo
and within this genus to the species Homo
Homo
sapiens
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Physicist
A physicist is a scientist who has specialized knowledge in the field of physics, which encompasses the interactions of matter and energy at all length and time scales in the physical universe. [1][2] Physicists generally are interested in the root or ultimate causes of phenomena, and usually frame their understanding in mathematical terms. Physicists work across a wide range of research fields, spanning all length scales: from sub-atomic and particle physics, to molecular length scales of chemical and biological interest, to cosmological length scales encompassing the Universe
Universe
as a whole
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Synonym
A synonym is a word or phrase that means exactly or nearly the same as another word or phrase in the same language. Words that are synonyms are said to be synonymous, and the state of being a synonym is called synonymy. For example, the words begin, start, commence, and initiate are all synonyms of one another. Words are typically synonymous in one particular sense: for example, long and extended in the context long time or extended time are synonymous, but long cannot be used in the phrase extended family. Synonyms with the exact same meaning share a seme or denotational sememe, whereas those with inexactly similar meanings share a broader denotational or connotational sememe and thus overlap within a semantic field
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Tiergarten Schönbrunn
Tiergarten Schönbrunn
Tiergarten Schönbrunn
(literally, "Schönbrunn Zoo"), or "Vienna Zoo", is a zoo located on the grounds of the famous Schönbrunn Palace in Vienna, Austria. Founded as an imperial menagerie in 1752, it is the oldest continuously operating zoo in the world. Today, Tiergarten Schönbrunn
Tiergarten Schönbrunn
is considered and regards itself as a scientifically administered zoo which sees its main purpose as a centre for species conservation and general nature conservation as well as in the fulfillment of the education mandate given to it by the legislation
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Ornithologist
Ornithology
Ornithology
is a branch of zoology that concerns the study of birds. The word "ornithology" derives from the ancient Greek ὄρνις ornis ("bird") and λόγος logos ("rationale" or "explanation"). Several aspects of ornithology differ from related disciplines, due partly to the high visibility and the aesthetic appeal of birds.[1] Most marked among these is the extent of studies undertaken by amateurs working within the parameters of strict scientific methodology. The science of ornithology has a long history and studies on birds have helped develop several key concepts in evolution, behaviour and ecology such as the defin
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