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Acilius Glabrio
Manius Acilius Glabrio was a Roman general and consul of the Roman Republic in 191 BC.[1] He came from an illustrious plebeian family (gens) whose members held magistracies throughout the Republic and into the Imperial era. Career[edit] Glabrio was a tribune of the plebs in 201 BC, plebeian aedile in 197, and praetor peregrinus in 195.[2] As consul, Glabrio defeated the Seleucid ruler Antiochus the Great
Antiochus the Great
at the Battle of Thermopylae, and compelled him to leave Greece
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Roman Censor
The censor was a magistrate in ancient Rome
Rome
who was responsible for maintaining the census, supervising public morality, and overseeing certain aspects of the government's finances.[1] The power of the censors is absolute: no magistrate can oppose their decisions, only another censor who succeeds them could cancel it. The censors' regulation of public morality is the origin of the modern meaning of the words "censor" and "censorship".[2]Contents1 Early history of the magistracy 2 Election 3 Attributes 4 Abolition 5 Duties5.1 Census5.1.1 Census
Census
beyond Rome 5.1.2 Other uses of census5.2 Regimen morum5.2.1 Punishments5.3 Administration of the finances of the state 5.4 Lustrum6 Census
Census
statistics6.1 Sources7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEarly history of the magistracy[edit] The census was first instituted by Servius
Servius
Tullius, sixth king of Rome
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Regions Of Ancient Greece
The regions of ancient Greece
Greece
were areas identified by the ancient Greeks
Greeks
as geographical sub-divisions of the Hellenic world. These regions are described in the works of ancient historians and geographers, and in the legends and myths of the ancient Greeks. Conceptually, there is no clear theme to the structure of these regions. Some, particularly in the Peloponnese, can be seen primarily as distinct geo-physical units, defined by physical boundaries such as mountain ranges and rivers. These regions retained their identity, even when the identity of the people living there changed during the Greek Dark Ages
Greek Dark Ages
(or at least, was conceived by the Greeks
Greeks
to have changed)
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Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5] Other works are actively dedicated
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Thomas Robert Shannon Broughton
Thomas Robert Shannon Broughton, FBA (/ˈbrɔːtən/; 17 February 1900 – 17 September 1993) was a Canadian
Canadian
classical scholar and leading Latin
Latin
prosopographer of the twentieth century.[1] He is especially noted for his definitive three-volume work, Magistrates of the Roman Republic (1951-1986).[2]Contents1 Life and career 2 Magistrates of the Roman Republic 3 Achievements and awards 4 Works 5 Students 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksLife and career[edit] Broughton was born in 1900 in Corbetton, Ontario. He attended Victoria College at the University of Toronto. There he received a B.A. in 1921 with honors in classics. He earned his M.A. in 1922. After studying at the University of Chicago, he was made a Rogers Fellow at Johns Hopkins University, where he received a Ph.D
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Roman Calendar
The Roman calendar
Roman calendar
is the calendar used by the Roman kingdom
Roman kingdom
and republic. It is often inclusive of the Julian calendar
Julian calendar
established by the reforms of the dictator Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
and emperor Augustus
Augustus
in the late 1st century BC and sometimes inclusive of any system dated by inclusive counting towards months' kalends, nones, and ides in the Roman manner
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Intercalation (timekeeping)
Intercalation or embolism in timekeeping is the insertion of a leap day, week, or month into some calendar years to make the calendar follow the seasons or moon phases. Lunisolar calendars may require intercalations of both days and months.Contents1 Solar calendars 2 Lunisolar calendars 3 Islamic calendars 4 Leap seconds 5 Other uses 6 See also 7 ReferencesSolar calendars[edit] Further information: Intercalary month (Egypt) The solar or tropical year does not have a whole number of days (it is about 365.24 days), but a calendar year must have a whole number of days
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Pontiff
A pontiff (from Latin
Latin
pontifex) was, in Roman antiquity, a member of the most illustrious of the colleges of priests of the Roman religion, the College of Pontiffs.[1][2] The term "pontiff" was later applied to any high or chief priest and, in Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
ecclesiastical usage, to a bishop and more particularly to the Bishop
Bishop
of Rome, the Pope
Pope
or "Roman Pontiff".[3]Look up pontiff or Pontiff in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Contents1 Etymology 2 Ancient Rome 3 Catholicism 4 Other religions 5 See also 6 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The English term derives through Old French pontif[3][4] from Latin pontifex, a word commonly held to come from the Latin
Latin
root words pons (bridge) + facere (to do, to make), and so to have the literal meaning of "bridge-builder"
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Legatus
A legatus (anglicized as legate) was a high ranking Roman military office in the Roman army, equivalent to a modern high ranking general officer. Initially used to delegate power, the term became formalized under Augustus
Augustus
as the officer in command of a legion. From the times of the Roman Republic, legates had received large shares of the army's booty at the end of a successful campaign, which made the position a lucrative one, so it could often attract even distinguished consuls (e.g., the consul Lucius Julius Caesar volunteered late in the Gallic Wars
Gallic Wars
as a legate under his first cousin once removed, Gaius Julius Caesar).Contents1 Overview 2 Diplomatic legatus 3 See also 4 ReferencesOverview[edit] The men who filled the office of legate were drawn from among the senatorial class of Rome
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Tribune
Tribune
Tribune
(Latin: Tribunus) was the title of various elected officials in Ancient Rome. The two most important were the tribunes of the plebs and the military tribunes. For most of Roman history, a college of ten tribunes of the plebs acted as a check on the authority of the senate and the annual magistrates, holding the power of ius intercessionis to intervene on behalf of the plebeians, and veto unfavourable legislation. There were also military tribunes, who commanded portions of the Roman army, subordinate to the higher magistrates, such as the consuls and praetors, promagistrates, and their legates. Various officers within the Roman army
Roman army
were also known as tribunes
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Patrician (ancient Rome)
The patricians (from Latin: patricius) were originally a group of ruling class families in ancient Rome. The distinction was highly significant in the early Republic—but its relevance waned after the Conflict of the Orders
Conflict of the Orders
(494 BC to 287 BC), and by the time of the late Republic and Empire, membership in the patriciate was of only nominal significance. After the Western Empire fell, it remained a high honorary title in the Byzantine Empire. Medieval patrician classes were once again formally defined groups of leading burgess families in many medieval Italian republics, such as Venice and Genoa, and subsequently "patrician" became a vague term used for aristocrats and the higher bourgeoisie in many countries.Contents1 Origin 2 Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and Empire2.1 Status 2.2 Patricians vs
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Titus Quinctius Flamininus
Titus Quinctius Flamininus (/ˌflæmɪˈnaɪnəs/ FLAM-i-NY-nəs; c. 229–174 BC) was a Roman politician and general instrumental in the Roman conquest of Greece.[1] A member of the patrician gens Quinctia, and brother to Lucius Quinctius Flamininus, he served as a military tribune in the Second Punic war and in 205 BC he was appointed propraetor in Tarentum. He was a quaestor in 199 BC. He became consul in 198 BC, despite being only about thirty years old, younger than the constitutional age required to serve in that position
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Aetolian League
The Aetolian League
Aetolian League
(also transliterated as Aitolian League) was a confederation of tribal communities and cities[1] in ancient Greece centered in Aetolia
Aetolia
in central Greece. It was established, probably during the early Hellenistic era, in opposition to Macedon
Macedon
and the Achaean League. Two annual meetings were held in Thermika and Panaetolika. It occupied Delphi
Delphi
from 290 BC and gained territory steadily until, by the end of the 3rd century BC, it controlled the whole of central Greece outside Attica
Attica
and Boeotia. At its peak, the league's territory included Locris, Malis, Dolopes, part of Thessaly, Phocis, and Acarnania
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Roman Magistrate
The Roman magistrates were elected officials in Ancient Rome. During the period of the Roman Kingdom, the King of Rome
King of Rome
was the principal executive magistrate.[1] His power, in practice, was absolute. He was the chief priest, lawgiver, judge, and the sole commander of the army.[1][2] When the king died, his power reverted to the Roman Senate, which then chose an Interrex to facilitate the election of a new king. During the transition from monarchy to republic, the constitutional balance of power shifted from the executive (the Roman king) to the Roman Senate. When the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
was founded in 509 BC, the powers that had been held by the king were transferred to the Roman consuls, of which two were to be elected each year
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