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Acheron
The Acheron
Acheron
(/ˈækərən/; Ancient Greek: Ἀχέρων (Acheron)[1] or Ἀχερούσιος (Acherusius); Greek: Αχέροντας (Acherontas)) is a river located in the Epirus
Epirus
region of northwest Greece. Its source is near the village Zotiko, in the southwestern part of the Ioannina regional unit and it flows into the Ionian Sea
Ionian Sea
in Ammoudia, near Parga.Contents1 Mythology 2 Gallery 3 References 4 External linksMythology[edit] In ancient Greek mythology, Acheron
Acheron
was known as the "river of woe", and was one of the five rivers of the Greek underworld
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Euripides
Euripides
Euripides
(/jʊəˈrɪpɪdiːz/ or /jɔːˈrɪpɪdiːz/;[1] Greek: Εὐριπίδης; Ancient Greek: [eu̯.riː.pí.dɛːs]) (c. 480 – c. 406 BC) was a tragedian of classical Athens. Along with Aeschylus
Aeschylus
and Sophocles, he is one of the three ancient Greek tragedians for whom a significant number of plays have survived. Some ancient scholars attributed 95 plays to him but, according to the Suda, it was 92 at most. Of these, 18 or 19 have survived more or less complete (there has been debate about his authorship of Rhesus, largely on stylistic grounds)[2] and there are also fragments, some substantial, of most of the other plays
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Argonauts
The Argonauts
Argonauts
(/ˈɑːrɡəˌnɔːt, -ˌnɒt/; Greek: Ἀργοναῦται Argonautai) were a band of heroes in Greek mythology, who in the years before the Trojan War, around 1300 BC,[1] accompanied Jason
Jason
to Colchis
Colchis
in his quest to find the Golden Fleece. Their name comes from their ship, Argo, named after its builder, Argus. "Argonauts" literally means " Argo
Argo
sailors"
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Greece
Greece
Greece
(Greek: Ελλάδα), officially the Hellenic Republic (Ελληνική Δημοκρατία), historically also known as Hellas, is a country located in Southern Europe,[10] with a population of approximately 11 million as of 2016. Athens
Athens
is the nation's capital and largest city, followed by Thessaloniki. Greece
Greece
is located at the crossroads of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Situated on the southern tip of the Balkan Peninsula, it shares land borders with Albania
Albania
to the northwest, the Republic of Macedonia
Republic of Macedonia
and Bulgaria
Bulgaria
to the north, and Turkey
Turkey
to the northeast
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Suda
The Suda
Suda
or Souda
Souda
(Medieval Greek: Σοῦδα, translit. Soûda; Latin: Suidae Lexicon[1]) is a large 10th-century Byzantine encyclopedia of the ancient Mediterranean world, formerly attributed to an author called Soudas (Σούδας) or Souidas (Σουίδας). It is an encyclopedic lexicon, written in Greek, with 30,000 entries, many drawing from ancient sources that have since been lost, and often derived from medieval Christian compilers
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Helios
Helios
Helios
(/ˈhiːli.ɒs/; Ancient Greek: Ἥλιος Hēlios; Latinized as Helius; Ἠέλιος in Homeric
Homeric
Greek) is the god and personification of the Sun
Sun
in Greek mythology. He is the son of the Titan Hyperion and the Titaness Theia
Theia
(according to Hesiod), also known as Euryphaessa
Euryphaessa
(in Homeric
Homeric
Hymn 31) and brother of the goddesses Selene, the moon, and Eos, the dawn. Helios
Helios
was described as a handsome young man crowned with the shining aureole of the Sun, who drove the chariot of the sun across the sky each day to earth-circling Oceanus
Oceanus
and through the world-ocean returned to the East at night
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Corfu
Corfu
Corfu
or Kerkyra (/kɔːrˈfuː, -fjuː/; Greek: Κέρκυρα, translit. Kérkyra, [ˈcercira]; Ancient Greek: Κόρκυρα, translit. Kórkyra; Latin: Corcyra; Italian: Corfù) is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea. It is the second largest of the Ionian Islands,[3] and, including its small satellite islands, forms the northwesternmost part of Greece.[4] The island is part of the Corfu regional unit, and is administered as a single municipality, which also includes the smaller islands of Ereikoussa, Mathraki
Mathraki
and Othonoi. The municipality has an area of 610,9 km2, the island proper 592,8 km2.[5] The principal city of the island and seat of the municipality (pop. 32,095) is also named Corfu.[6] Corfu
Corfu
is home to the Ionian University. The island is bound up with the history of Greece
Greece
from the beginnings of Greek mythology
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Karadeniz Ereğli
Karadeniz Ereğli
Karadeniz Ereğli
is a city and district in Zonguldak Province
Zonguldak Province
of Turkey, on the Black Sea
Black Sea
shore at the mouth of the Kılıçsu River. Population is 102,828 as of 2012. The mayor is Hüseyin Uysal.Contents1 Facts 2 History 3 Sports 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksFacts[edit] Modern Ereğli is the home of Erdemir, Turkey's largest steel plant. It has a large natural harbour, located in the lee of Baba Burnu and therefore one of the few geographically attractive places for a harbour on the western Black Sea
Black Sea
coast of Turkey. Ereğli is well developed due to the presence of the steel plant and fishing is a major commercial activity in the city. Because of its Black Sea
Black Sea
beach, Ereğli is a popular tourist destination locally
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Turkey
Turkey
Turkey
(Turkish: Türkiye [ˈtyɾcije]), officially the Republic of Turkey
Turkey
(Turkish: Türkiye Cumhuriyeti [ˈtyɾcije d͡ʒumˈhuɾijeti] ( listen)), is a transcontinental country in Eurasia, mainly in Anatolia
Anatolia
in Western Asia, with a smaller portion on the Balkan peninsula in Southeast Europe.[7] Turkey
Turkey
is bordered by eight countries with Greece
Greece
and Bulgaria
Bulgaria
to the northwest; Georgia to the northeast; Armenia, the Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
and Iran
Iran
to the east; and Iraq
Iraq
and Syria
Syria
to the south
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Apollonius Of Rhodes
Apollonius of Rhodes
Rhodes
(Ancient Greek: Ἀπολλώνιος Ῥόδιος Apollṓnios Rhódios; Latin: Apollonius Rhodius; fl. first half of 3rd century BCE), was an ancient Greek author, best known for the Argonautica, an epic poem about Jason
Jason
and the Argonauts and their quest for the Golden Fleece. The poem is one of the few extant examples of the epic genre and it was both innovative and influential, providing Ptolemaic Egypt
Ptolemaic Egypt
with a "cultural mnemonic" or national "archive of images",[1] and offering the Latin poets Virgil and Gaius Valerius Flaccus a model for their own epics. His other poems, which survive only in small fragments, concerned the beginnings or foundations of cities, such as Alexandria
Alexandria
and Cnidus – places of interest to the Ptolemies, whom he served as a scholar and librarian at the Library of Alexandria
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Virgil
Publius Vergilius Maro (Classical Latin: [ˈpuː.blɪ.ʊs wɛrˈɡɪ.lɪ.ʊs ˈma.roː]; traditional dates October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC[1]), usually called Virgil
Virgil
or Vergil /ˈvɜːrdʒɪl/ in English, was an ancient Roman poet of the Augustan period. He wrote three of the most famous poems in Latin
Latin
literature: the Eclogues
Eclogues
(or Bucolics), the Georgics, and the epic Aeneid. A number of minor poems, collected in the Appendix Vergiliana, are sometimes attributed to him.[2][3] Virgil
Virgil
is traditionally ranked as one of Rome's greatest poets. His Aeneid
Aeneid
has been considered the national epic of ancient Rome
Rome
since the time of its composition
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Avernus
Avernus
Avernus
was an ancient name for a volcanic crater near Cumae
Cumae
(Cuma), Italy, in the Region of Campania
Campania
west of Naples. Part of the Phlegraean Fields
Phlegraean Fields
of volcanoes,[1] Avernus
Avernus
is approximately 3.2 kilometres (2.0 mi) in circumference. Within the crater is Lake Avernus
Avernus
(Lago d'Averno).[1]Contents1 Role in ancient Roman society 2 Averni 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksRole in ancient Roman society[edit] Avernus
Avernus
was believed to be the entrance to the underworld, and is portrayed as such in the Aeneid
Aeneid
of Virgil
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Plato
Plato
Plato
(/ˈpleɪtoʊ/;[a][1] Greek: Πλάτων[a] Plátōn, pronounced [plá.tɔːn] in Classical Attic; 428/427 or 424/423[b] – 348/347 BC) was a philosopher in Classical Greece
Classical Greece
and the founder of the Academy
Academy
in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world
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Oceanus
Oceanus
Oceanus
(/oʊˈsiːənəs/; Greek: Ὠκεανός Ōkeanós,[1] pronounced [ɔːkeanós]), also known as Ogenus (Ὤγενος Ōgenos or Ὠγηνός Ōgēnos) or Ogen (Ὠγήν Ōgēn),[2] was a divine figure in classical antiquity, believed by the ancient Greeks and Romans to be the divine personification of the sea, an enormous river encircling the world.Contents1 Etymology 2 Mythological account 3 Iconography 4 In cosmography and geography 5 Genealogical chart 6 See also 7 References 8 Sources 9 External linksEtymology[edit] Oceanus
Oceanus
attending the Wedding of Peleus
Peleus
and Thetis
Thetis
on an Athenian, black-figure Dinos
Dinos
by Sophilos, c. 590 BC (British Museum)R. S. P
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Synecdoche
A synecdoche (/sɪˈnɛkdəkiː/, sih-NEK-də-kee;[1] from Greek συνεκδοχή, synekdoche, lit. "simultaneous understanding")[2] is a figure of speech in which a term for a part of something refers to the whole of something or vice versa.[3] A synecdoche is a class of metonymy, often by means of either mentioning a part for the whole or conversely the whole for one of its parts. Examples from common English expressions include "bread and butter" (for "livelihood"), "suits" (for "businessmen"), "boots" (for "soldiers") (pars pro toto), and "vacuum" (for "vacuum cleaner") or conversely "America" (for "the United States
United States
of America") (totum pro parte).[4] The use of government buildings to refer to their occupant(s) is on the border between synecdoche and metonymy
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Sigmund Freud
Sigmund Freud
Freud
(/frɔɪd/ FROYD;[3] German: [ˈziːkmʊnt ˈfʁɔʏt]; born Sigismund Schlomo Freud; 6 May 1856 – 23 September 1939) was an Austrian neurologist and the founder of psychoanalysis, a clinical method for treating psychopathology through dialogue between a patient and a psychoanalyst.[4] Freud
Freud
was born to Galician Jewish
Jewish
parents in the Moravian town of Freiberg, in the Austrian Empire. He qualified as a doctor of medicine in 1881 at the University of Vienna.[5][6] Upon completing his habilitation in 1885, he was appointed a docent in neuropathology and became an affiliated professor in 1902.[7] Freud
Freud
lived and worked in Vienna, having set up his clinical practice there in 1886. In 1938 Freud
Freud
left Austria to escape the Nazis
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