HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Acarapis Woodi
Acarapis woodi
Acarapis woodi
(honey bee tracheal mite) is an internal parasite of honey bees,[1] originally described from the Isle of Wight.[2] Acarapis woodi
Acarapis woodi
mites live and reproduce in the tracheae of the bees. All mites are arachnids like spiders.[2] The female mite attaches 5–7 eggs to the tracheal walls, where the larvae hatch and develop in 11–15 days to adult mites.[2] The mites parasitize young bees up to two weeks old through the tracheal tube openings. There, they pierce the tracheal tube walls with their mouthparts and feed on the haemolymph of the bees. More than a hundred mites can populate the tracheae and weaken the bees. The mites are generally less than 175 micrometres (0.007 in) long, and can only be seen and identified under a microscope.[2] Other mites similar in appearance include Acarapis externus and Acarapis dorsalis. References[edit]^ ""Tracheal mites" Tarsonemidae"
[...More...]

"Acarapis Woodi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
[...More...]

"Taxonomy (biology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Animal
Animals are multicellular eukaryotic organisms that form the biological kingdom Animalia. With few exceptions, animals consume organic material, breathe oxygen, are able to move, reproduce sexually, and grow from a hollow sphere of cells, the blastula, during embryonic development. Over 1.5 million living animal species have been described—of which around 1 million are insects—but it has been estimated there are over 7 million in total. Animals range in size from 8.5 millionths of a metre to 33.6 metres (110 ft) long and have complex interactions with each other and their environments, forming intricate food webs. The study of animals is called zoology. Aristotle divided animals into those with blood and those without. Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus
created the first hierarchical biological classification for animals in 1758 with his Systema Naturae, which Jean-Baptiste Lamarck expanded into 14 phyla by 1809
[...More...]

"Animal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

National Center For Biotechnology Information
The National Center for Biotechnology
Biotechnology
Information (NCBI) is part of the United States National Library of Medicine
United States National Library of Medicine
(NLM), a branch of the National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
(NIH). The NCBI is located in Bethesda, Maryland and was founded in 1988 through legislation sponsored by Senator Claude Pepper. The NCBI houses a series of databases relevant to biotechnology and biomedicine and is an important resource for bioinformatics tools and services. Major databases include GenBank
GenBank
for DNA
DNA
sequences and PubMed, a bibliographic database for the biomedical literature. Other databases include the NCBI Epigenomics database
[...More...]

"National Center For Biotechnology Information" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

INaturalist
iNaturalist is a citizen science project and online social network of naturalists, citizen scientists, and biologists built on the concept of mapping and sharing observations of biodiversity across the globe.[2] Observations may be added via the website or from a mobile application.[3][4] The observations provide valuable open data to a variety of scientific research projects, museums, botanic gardens, parks, and other organizations.[5][6][7] Users of iNaturalist have contributed over eight million observations[8] since its founding in 2008, and the project has been called "a standard-bearer for natural history mobile applications."[9]Contents1 History 2 Participation 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] iNaturalist.org began in 2008 as a UC Berkeley School of Information Master's final project of Nate Agrin, Jessica Kline, and Ken-ichi Ueda.[1] Nate Agrin and Ken-ichi Ueda continued work on the site with Sean McGregor, a web developer
[...More...]

"INaturalist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Global Biodiversity Information Facility
The Global Biodiversity
Biodiversity
Information Facility (GBIF) is an international organisation that focuses on making scientific data on biodiversity available via the Internet
Internet
using web services. The data are provided by many institutions from around the world; GBIF's information architecture makes these data accessible and searchable through a single portal. Data available through the GBIF portal are primarily distribution data on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes for the world, and scientific names data. The mission of the Global Biodiversity
Biodiversity
information Facility (GBIF) is to facilitate free and open access to biodiversity data worldwide to underpin sustainable development
[...More...]

"Global Biodiversity Information Facility" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Fauna Europaea
Fauna Europaea is a database of the scientific names and distribution of all living multicellular European land and fresh-water animals.[1] Its construction was initially funded by the European Union (2000–2004). The project is co-ordinated by the University of Amsterdam. References[edit]^ de Jong, Y; Verbeek, M; Michelsen, V; Bjørn Pde, P; Los, W; Steeman, F; Bailly, N; Basire, C; Chylarecki, P; Stloukal, E; Hagedorn, G; Wetzel, FT; Glöckler, F; Kroupa, A; Korb, G; Hoffmann, A; Häuser, C; Kohlbecker, A; Müller, A; Güntsch, A; Stoev, P; Penev, L (2014). " Fauna Europaea – all European animal species on the web". Biodivers Data J (2): e4034. doi:10.3897/BDJ.2.e4034. PMC 4206781 
[...More...]

"Fauna Europaea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

EPPO Code
An EPPO code, formerly known as a Bayer code, is an encoded identifier that is used by the European and Mediterranean Plant
Plant
Protection Organization (EPPO), in a system designed to uniquely identify organisms – namely plants, pests and pathogens – that are important to agriculture and crop protection. EPPO codes are a core component of a database of names, both scientific and vernacular. Although originally started by the Bayer Corporation, the official list of codes is now maintained by EPPO.[1]Contents1 EPPO code database1.1 Example2 External links 3 ReferencesEPPO code database[edit] All codes and their associated names are included in a database (EPPO Global Database). In total, there are over 68,500 species listed in the EPPO database, including:[2]36,000 species of plants (e.g. cultivated, wild plants and weeds) 24,000 species of animals (e.g. insects, mites, nematodes, rodents), biocontrol agents 8,500 microorganism species (e.g
[...More...]

"EPPO Code" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Encyclopedia Of Life
The Encyclopedia of Life
Life
(EOL) is a free, online collaborative encyclopedia intended to document all of the 1.9 million living species known to science. It is compiled from existing databases and from contributions by experts and non-experts throughout the world.[2] It aims to build one "infinitely expandable" page for each species, including video, sound, images, graphics, as well as text.[3] In addition, the Encyclopedia incorporates content from the Biodiversity Heritage Library, which digitizes millions of pages of printed literature from the world's major natural history libraries. The project was initially backed by a US$50 million funding commitment, led by the MacArthur Foundation
MacArthur Foundation
and the Sloan Foundation, who provided US$20 million and US$5 million, respectively
[...More...]

"Encyclopedia Of Life" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wikidata
Wikidata
Wikidata
is a collaboratively edited knowledge base hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. It is intended to provide a common source of data which can be used by Wikimedia projects such as,[4][5] and by anyone else, under a public domain license. This is similar to the way Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons
provides storage for media files and access to those files for all Wikimedia projects, and which are also freely available for reuse. Wikidata
Wikidata
is powered by the software Wikibase.[6]Contents1 Concepts 2 Development history2.1 Phase 1 2.2 Phase 2 2.3 Phase 33 Reception 4 Logo 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksConcepts[edit]ScreenshotsThree statements from Wikidata's item on the planet Mars
[...More...]

"Wikidata" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

University Of Florida
The University of Florida
Florida
(commonly referred to as Florida
Florida
or UF) is an American public land-grant, sea-grant, and space-grant research university on a 2,000-acre (8.1 km2) campus in Gainesville, Florida
[...More...]

"University Of Florida" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States Department Of Agriculture
The United States Department of Agriculture
United States Department of Agriculture
(USDA), also known as the Agriculture Department, is the U.S. federal executive department responsible for developing and executing federal laws related to farming, agriculture, forestry, and food. It aims to meet the needs of farmers and ranchers, promote agricultural trade and production, work to assure food safety, protect natural resources, foster rural communities and end hunger in the United States and internationally. Approximately 80% of the USDA's $141 billion budget goes to the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) program
[...More...]

"United States Department Of Agriculture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Agricultural Research Service
The Agricultural Research Service
Agricultural Research Service
(ARS) is the principal in-house research agency of the United States Department of Agriculture
United States Department of Agriculture
(USDA). ARS is one of four agencies in USDA's Research, Education and Economics mission area. ARS is charged with extending the nation's scientific knowledge and solving agricultural problems through its four national program areas: nutrition, food safety and quality; animal production and protection; natural resources and sustainable agricultural systems; and crop production and protection. ARS research focuses on solving problems affecting Americans every day. ARS has more than 2,200 permanent scientists working on approximately 1,100 research projects at more than 100 locations across the country, with a few locations in other countries
[...More...]

"Agricultural Research Service" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hemolymph
Hemolymph, or haemolymph, is a fluid, analogous to the blood in vertebrates, that circulates in the interior of the arthropod body remaining in direct contact with the animal's tissues. It is composed of a fluid plasma in which hemolymph cells called hemocytes are suspended. In addition to hemocytes, the plasma also contains many chemicals. It is the major tissue type of the open circulatory system characteristic of arthropods (e.g. arachnids, crustaceans and insects).[1][2] In addition, some non-arthropods such as molluscs possess a hemolymphatic circulatory system.Contents1 Method of transport 2 Constituents2.1 Inorganic 2.2 Amino acids 2.3 Proteins 2.4 Other organic constituents3 Hemocytes 4 Comparisons to vertebrates 5 Specialist uses 6 See also 7 References 8 Sources 9 External linksMethod of transport[edit] In the grasshopper, the closed portion of the system consists of tubular hearts and an aorta running along the dorsal side of the insect
[...More...]

"Hemolymph" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Arthropod Mouthparts
The mouthparts of arthropods have evolved into a number of forms, each adapted to a different style or mode of feeding. Most mouthparts represent modified, paired appendages, which in ancestral forms would have appeared more like legs than mouthparts. In general, arthropods have mouthparts for cutting and chewing, piercing and sucking, shredding and chewing, siphoning, and filtering. This article outlines the basic elements of four arthropod groups: insects, myriapods, crustaceans and chelicerates. Insects are used as the model, with the novel mouthparts of the other groups introduced in turn
[...More...]

"Arthropod Mouthparts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.