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Acamas
Acamas or Akamas
Akamas
(/ɑːˈkɑːmɑːs/; Ancient Greek: Ἀκάμας, folk etymology: "unwearying") was a name attributed to several characters in Greek mythology. The following three all fought in the Trojan War, and only the first was not mentioned by Homer.Acamas, son of Theseus, mentioned by Virgil
Virgil
as being in the Trojan horse. Acamas, son of Eussorus, from Thrace. With his comrade Peiros, son of Imbrasus, Acamas led a contingent of Thracian warriors to the Trojan War.[1] He was killed by Ajax.[2] Acamas, son of Antenor, fought on the side of the Trojans and killed one Greek.[3] Acamas, one of the suitors of Penelope.[4] Acamas, one of the Thebans who laid an ambush for Tydeus
Tydeus
when he returned from Thebes. He was killed by Tydeus.[5] Acamas, an Aetolian in the army of the Seven Against Thebes.[6] Acamas, one of Actaeon's dogs.[7]References[edit]^ Homer
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Troy
Troy
Troy
(Ancient Greek: Τροία, Troia or Τροίας, Troias and Ἴλιον, Ilion or Ἴλιος, Ilios; Latin: Troia and Ilium;[note 1] Hittite: Wilusha or Truwisha;[1][2] Turkish: Truva or Troya) was a city situated in the far northwest of the region known in late Classical antiquity
Classical antiquity
as Asia Minor, now known as Anatolia
Anatolia
in modern Turkey, near (just south of) the southwest mouth of the Dardanelles strait and northwest of Mount Ida. The present-day location is known as Hisarlik. It was the setting of the Trojan War
Trojan War
described in the Greek Epic Cycle, in particular in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer
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William Smith (lexicographer)
Sir William Smith (20 May 1813 – 7 October 1893)[1] was an English lexicographer. He also made advances in the teaching of Greek and Latin in schools.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Publications3 Honours and death 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Smith was born in Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist
Nonconformist
parents. He attended the Madras House school of John Allen in Hackney.[2] Originally destined for a theological career, he instead was articled to a solicitor. In his spare time he taught himself classics, and when he entered University College London
University College London
he carried off both the Greek and Latin prizes
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Fabulae
Gaius Julius Hyginus (/hɪˈdʒaɪnəs/; c. 64 BC – AD 17) was a Latin
Latin
author, a pupil of the famous Cornelius Alexander Polyhistor, and a freedman of Caesar Augustus. He was elected superintendent of the Palatine library by Augustus
Augustus
according to Suetonius' De Grammaticis, 20.[1] It is not clear whether Hyginus was a native of the Iberian Peninsula
Iberian Peninsula
or of Alexandria. Suetonius remarks that he fell into great poverty in his old age, and was supported by the historian Clodius Licinus. Hyginus was a voluminous author: his works included topographical and biographical treatises, commentaries on Helvius Cinna and the poems of Virgil, and disquisitions on agriculture and bee-keeping
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Hyginus
Gaius Julius Hyginus (/hɪˈdʒaɪnəs/; c. 64 BC – AD 17) was a Latin
Latin
author, a pupil of the famous Cornelius Alexander Polyhistor, and a freedman of Caesar Augustus. He was elected superintendent of the Palatine library by Augustus
Augustus
according to Suetonius' De Grammaticis, 20.[1] It is not clear whether Hyginus was a native of the Iberian Peninsula
Iberian Peninsula
or of Alexandria. Suetonius remarks that he fell into great poverty in his old age, and was supported by the historian Clodius Licinus. Hyginus was a voluminous author: his works included topographical and biographical treatises, commentaries on Helvius Cinna and the poems of Virgil, and disquisitions on agriculture and bee-keeping
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Seven Against Thebes
Seven Against Thebes
Seven Against Thebes
(Ancient Greek: Ἑπτὰ ἐπὶ Θήβας, Hepta epi Thēbas; Latin: Septem contra Thebas) is the third play in an Oedipus-themed trilogy produced by Aeschylus
Aeschylus
in 467 BC. The trilogy is sometimes referred to as the Oedipodea.[1] It concerns the battle between an Argive
Argive
army led by Polynices
Polynices
and the army of Thebes led by Eteocles
Eteocles
and his supporters. The trilogy won the first prize at the City Dionysia
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Tydeus
In Greek mythology, Tydeus
Tydeus
(/ˈtaɪdiəs, -djuːs, ˈtɪdiəs/; Greek: Τυδεύς Tūdeus) was an Aeolian hero of the generation before the Trojan War. He was one of the Seven Against Thebes, and the father of Diomedes, who is frequently known by the patronymic Tydides.Contents1 Exile 2 Seven against Thebes2.1 Gathering of the Seven 2.2 Nemean Games 2.3 Envoy to Thebes3 In literature and art 4 Notes 5 ReferencesExile[edit] Tydeus
Tydeus
was a son of Oeneus
Oeneus
and either Periboea, Oeneus's second wife, or Gorge, Oeneus's daughter
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Dictionary Of Greek And Roman Biography And Mythology
The Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology
Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology
(1849, originally published 1844 under a slightly different title) is an encyclopedia/biographical dictionary. Edited by William Smith, the dictionary spans three volumes and 3,700 pages. It is a classic work of 19th-century lexicography. The work is a companion to Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities and Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography.[1]Contents1 Authors and scope 2 Use and availability today 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksAuthors and scope[edit]Excerpt from Philolaus
Philolaus
Pythagoras book, (Charles Peter Mason, 1870)The work lists thirty-five authors in addition to the editor, who is also an author for some definitions and articles
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5] Other works are actively dedicated
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Virgil
Publius Vergilius Maro (Classical Latin: [ˈpuː.blɪ.ʊs wɛrˈɡɪ.lɪ.ʊs ˈma.roː]; traditional dates October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC[1]), usually called Virgil
Virgil
or Vergil /ˈvɜːrdʒɪl/ in English, was an ancient Roman poet of the Augustan period. He wrote three of the most famous poems in Latin
Latin
literature: the Eclogues
Eclogues
(or Bucolics), the Georgics, and the epic Aeneid. A number of minor poems, collected in the Appendix Vergiliana, are sometimes attributed to him.[2][3] Virgil
Virgil
is traditionally ranked as one of Rome's greatest poets. His Aeneid
Aeneid
has been considered the national epic of ancient Rome
Rome
since the time of its composition
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Greek Mythology
Greek mythology
Greek mythology
is the body of myths and teachings that belong to the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world, and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. It was a part of the religion in ancient Greece. Modern scholars refer to and study the myths in an attempt to shed light on the religious and political institutions of ancient Greece and its civilization, and to gain understanding of the nature of myth-making itself.[1] Greek mythology
Greek mythology
has had an extensive influence on the culture, arts, and literature of Western civilization and remains part of Western heritage and language
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Folk Etymology
Folk etymology or reanalysis – sometimes called pseudo-etymology, popular etymology, or analogical reformation – is a change in a word or phrase resulting from the replacement of an unfamiliar form by a more familiar one.[1][2][3] The form or the meaning of an archaic, foreign, or otherwise unfamiliar word is reanalyzed as resembling more familiar words or morphemes. Rebracketing is a form of folk etymology in which a word is broken down or "bracketed" into a new set of supposed elements
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Ancient Greek
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
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Suitors Of Penelope
The suitors of Penelope
Penelope
(also known as the Proci) are one of the main subjects of Homer's Odyssey.Contents1 Role in the Odyssey 2 Important suitors2.1 Antinous 2.2 Eurymachus 2.3 Amphinomus3 List of suitors3.1 Appearing in the Odyssey 3.2 Appearing in the Bibliotheca4 ReferencesRole in the Odyssey[edit] In The Odyssey, Homer
Homer
describes Odysseus' journey home from the Trojan War. Prior to the Trojan War, Odysseus
Odysseus
was King of Ithaca, a Greek island known for its isolation and rugged terrain.[1] When Odysseus departs from Ithaca
Ithaca
to fight for the Greeks in the war, he leaves behind a newborn child, Telemachus, and his wife, Penelope
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Actaeon
Actaeon
Actaeon
(/ækˈtiːən/; Ancient Greek: Ἀκταίων Aktaion),[1] in Greek mythology, son of the priestly herdsman Aristaeus
Aristaeus
and Autonoe in Boeotia, was a famous Theban hero.[2] Like
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