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Abu Ubayd Al-Juzjani
Abū 'Ubayd al-Jūzjānī, (d.1070),[1] (ابو عبيد جوزجانی) was a Persian physician and chronicler from what is now Jowzjan Province
Jowzjan Province
in Afghanistan. He was the famous pupil of Avicenna, whom he first met in Gorgan.[2] He spent many years with his master in Isfahan, becoming his lifetime companion. After Avicenna's death, he completed Avicenna's Autobiography with a concluding section.[3] See also[edit]List of Iranian scientistsReferences[edit]^ Science, Medicine and Technology, Ahmad Dallal, The Oxford History of Islam, ed. John L. Esposito, (Oxford University Press, 1999), 171. ^ Ibn Sina (1974). The Life of Ibn Sina. SUNY Press. p. 43. ISBN 0-87395-226-X.  ^ Adamson, Peter (7 July 2016). Philosophy in the Islamic World: A History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps. Oxford University Press. p. 115. ISBN 978-0-19-957749-1. External links[edit]Dhanani, Alnoor (2007)
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Persian People
The Persians are an Iranian ethnic group that make up over half the population of Iran.[3][2] They share a common cultural system and are native speakers of the Persian language,[4][5][6] as well as closely related languages.[7][8] The ancient Persians were a nomadic branch of the ancient Iranian population that entered modern-day Iran
Iran
by the early 10th century BC.[9][10] Together with their compatriot allies, they established and ruled some of the world's most powerful empires,[11][12] well-recognized for their massive cultural, political, and social influence covering much of the territory and population of
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Al-Natili
Al-Husayn ibn Ibrahim ibn al-Hasan ibn Khurshid al-Tabari al-Natili al-Amuli (الحسين بن ابراهيم بن الحسن بن خورشيد الطبري النطيلي الآملی), was a Persian physician from Tabaristan. He flourished in the 10th century, and was a translator of Greek into Arabic
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Al-Kindi
Abu Yūsuf Yaʻqūb ibn ʼIsḥāq aṣ-Ṣabbāḥ al-Kindī (Arabic: أبو يوسف يعقوب بن إسحاق الصبّاح الكندي‎; Latin: Alkindus; c. 801–873 AD) was an Arab[2][3][4][5][6][7] Muslim
Muslim
philosopher, polymath, mathematician, physician and musician. Al-Kindi
Al-Kindi
was the first of the Muslim peripatetic philosophers, and is unanimously hailed as the "father of Arab philosophy"[8][9][10] for his synthesis, adaptation and promotion of Greek and Hellenistic philosophy
Hellenistic philosophy
in the Muslim
Muslim
world.[11] Al-Kindi
Al-Kindi
was born in Basra
Basra
and educated in Baghdad.[12] He became a prominent figure in the House of Wisdom, and a number of Abbasid Caliphs appointed him to oversee the translation of Greek scientific and philosophical texts into the Arabic language
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Masawaiyh
Yuhanna ibn Masawaih (circa 777–857), (Arabic: يوحنا بن ماسويه‎), also written Ibn Masawaih, Masawaiyh, and in Latin Mesue, Masuya, Mesue Major, Msuya, and Mesue the Elder was a Persian[1] or Assyrian Nestorian Christian
Nestorian Christian
physician[2][3] from the Academy of Gundishapur. According to The Canon of Medicine
The Canon of Medicine
for Avicenna
Avicenna
and 'Uyun al-Anba for the medieval Arabic historian Ibn Abi Usaybi'a, Masawaiyh's father was Assyrian and his mother was Slavic.[4]MesueBorn in 777 CE as the son of a pharmacist and physician from Gundishapur, he came to Baghdad
Baghdad
and studied under Jabril ibn Bukhtishu. He wrote mostly in Syriac and Arabic. He became director of a hospital in Baghdad, and was personal physician to four caliphs
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Shapur Ibn Sahl
Sābūr ibn Sahl (شاپور بن سهل گندیشاپوری; d. 869 CE) was a 9th-century Persian[1] Christian
Christian
physician from the Academy of Gundishapur. Among other medical works, he wrote one of the first medical books on antidotes called Aqrabadhin (القراباذين), which was divided into 22 volumes, and which was possibly the earliest of its kind to influence Islamic medicine. This antidotary enjoyed much popularity until it was superseded Ibn al-Tilmidh's version later in the first half of twelfth century. See also[edit]List of Iranian scientistsReferences[edit]^ Aʿlam, Hūšang. "EBN AL-BAYṬĀR, ŻĪĀʾ-AL-DĪN ABŪ MOḤA – Encyclopaedia Iranica". www.iranicaonline.org. Encyclopedia Iranica. Retrieved 11 February 2017. the Christian
Christian
Persian physician Sābūr (Šāpūr) b. Sahl from Gondēšāpūr (d. 255/869) ... Further reading[edit]F
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Ali Ibn Sahl Rabban Al-Tabari
Abu al-Hasan Ali ibn Sahl Rabban al-Tabari (Persian: علی ابن سهل ربان طبری‎) (c. 838 – c. 870 CE; also given as 810–855[1] or 808–864[2] also 783–858[3]), was a Persian[4][5] Muslim
Muslim
hakim, scholar, physician and psychologist, who produced one of the first encyclopedia of medicine. His stature, however, was eclipsed by his more famous pupil, Muhammad ibn Zakarīya Rāzi
Muhammad ibn Zakarīya Rāzi
("Rhazes").Contents1 Life 2 His works 3 Firdous al-Hikmah 4 Quotes 5 See also 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksLife[edit] Ali came from a Persian[6] or Syriac[3] family of Merv
Merv
but moved to Tabaristan
Tabaristan
(hence al-Tabari – "from Tabaristan")
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Al-Ruhawi
Ishāq bin Ali al-Rohawi (Arabic: إسحاق بن علي الرهاوي‎) was a 9th-century Arab
Arab
physician and the author of the first medical ethics book in Arabic medicine.[1] His Ethics of the Physician
Physician

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Yuhanna Ibn Bukhtishu
Yuhanna ibn Bukhtishu (Johannes Bukhtishu) was a 9th-century Persian[1] or Syriac[2] physician from Khuzestan, Persia.[3][4] Yuhanna ibn Bukhtishu‘ (or Bakhtishu‘) was a member of a prominent family of Nestorian Christian
Nestorian Christian
physicians originally from Jundishapur in Khuzastan who worked in Baghdad
Baghdad
from the 8th through the 10th centuries. The name is composite of middle Persian Bukht (saved)[5] and Syriac Ishu' (Jesus), which means saved by Jesus or one whose saviour is Jesus. Yuhanna ibn Bukhtishu was the illegitimate son of Jabril Ibn Bukhtishu (d. 870CE) who was physician to the caliphs al-Ma'mun, al-Wathiq and Al-Mutawakkil
Al-Mutawakkil
in Baghdad.[6] Ibn Bukhtishu‘, who worked in Baghdad
Baghdad
about 892CE, is known to have written a treatise on astrological knowledge necessary for a physician, but the treatise is now lost
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Salmawaih Ibn Bunan
Salmawaih ibn Bunan (died 840) was an Assyrian Nestorian Christian physician who translated works of Galen
Galen
from Greek into Arabic.[1] He served the Abbasid caliphs of Baghdad
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Qusta Ibn Luqa
Qusta ibn Luqa (820–912) (Costa ben Luca, Constabulus)[1] was a Syrian Melkite
Melkite
physician, scientist and translator. He was born in Baalbek. Travelling to parts of the Byzantine Empire, he brought back Greek texts and translated them into Arabic.Contents1 Personal life 2 Translations 3 Original works 4 Testimonials 5 Involvement with peers 6 Writings 7 Influence 8 See also 9 Notes 10 ReferencesPersonal life[edit] Qusta ibn Luqa al-Ba'albakki, i. e. from Baalbek
Baalbek
or Heliopolis, Lebanon, a Melkite
Melkite
Christian, was born in 820 and flourished in Baghdad. He was a philosopher, physician, mathematician and astronomer. He died in Armenia
Armenia
in A.D
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Abu Ul-Ala Shirazi
Abu ul-Ala Shirazi (died 1001) lived around the 10th century at the Court of Amir Azud ul-Duleh Bueieh. He found that arsenic could cure malaria. References[edit]Mahmoudian, Masoud; Rahimi-Moghaddam Parvaneh (Nov 2008). "The life and work of Abu ul-Ala Shirazi (d. 1001): a Persian pioneer in the treatment of malaria, in the style of Rhazes (865-925)". Journal of Medical Biography. England. 16 (4): 186–7. doi:10.1258/jmb.2007.007054
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Abul Hasan Al-Tabari
Abu-l-Hasan Ahmad ibn Mohammad al-Tabari, born in Amol, was a 10th-century Persian[1] physician from Tabaristan. He was the physician of Rukn al-Dawla, a Buyid
Buyid
ruler. He was author of a compendium of medicine Kitab al-mu'alaja al-buqratiya (Hippocratic treatments), in ten books. It is extant only in Arabic language. Sources[edit]^ Ali, Mowlavi, Muhammad; Rahim, Gholami,. "Abū al-Ḥasan al-Ṭabarī". Encyclopaedia Islamica. Encyclopaedia Islamica. doi:10.1163/1875-9831_isla_com_0078. Retrieved 27 February 2017. F
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Qumri
Abu Mansur Hasan ibn Nuh Qumri (Persian: ابو منصور حسن بن نوح قمری‎) was a Persian physician of the 10th century who lived in Khorasan. Qumri was the teacher of Avicenna. He was court physician to the Samanid
Samanid
prince al-Mansur, to whom he dedicated the only treatise by him that is preserved: the Kitab al-Ghina wa-al-Muna (The Book of Wealth and Wishes), which was also known as al-Shamsiyah al-mansuriyah (The Mansurian Sunshade) after its dedicatee. Little else in known of his life except that he died shortly after 990. Works[edit]Al-qani wa al-Mani (in Arabic) Al-Tanwir (in Persian and Arabic)See also[edit]List of Iranian scientistsSources[edit] For Qumri's life and compositions, see:Manfred Ullmann, Die Medizin im Islam, Handbuch der Orientalistik, Abteilung I, Erg?nzungsband vi, Abschnitt 1 (Leiden: E.J
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Yusuf Al-Khuri
Yusuf Al-Khuri, also known as Yusuf Al-Khuri al-Qass (Joseph the Priest) (d
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Abu Zayd Al-Balkhi
Abu Zayd Ahmed ibn Sahl Balkhi (Persian: ابو زید احمد بن سهل بلخی‎) was a Persian Muslim
Muslim
polymath: a geographer, mathematician, physician, psychologist and scientist. Born in 850 CE in Shamistiyan, in the province of Balkh, Khorasan (in modern-day Afghanistan), he was a disciple of al-Kindi
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