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Abkhazian Apsar
The apsar (Abkhazian: аҧсар) is a currency of Abkhazia. So far, only coins in denominations of 10, 25 and 50 apsars have been issued. While the coins are legal tender in the Republic of Abkhazia, their usage is very limited, and the coins are mostly made for collectors. In Abkhazia, the Russian ruble
Russian ruble
is used in practice. The first apsar coins were introduced in 2008. The Bank of Abkhazia
Abkhazia
is responsible for the apsar coins, and has so far issued two series: "Outstanding personalities of Abkhazia" (6 coins) and "The patriotic war of the Abkhaz nation 1992–1993" (2 coins). Persons who have appeared on coins include:Vladislav Ardzinba, president 1994–2005 Fazil Iskander, writer Dmitry Gulia, writer Samson Chanba, writer and statesman Bagrat Shinkuba, writer and politician Aleksandr Chachba, artist10 apsar coins are made of silver; 25 and 50 apsar coins are made of gold
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Abkhaz Language
Cyrillic
Cyrillic
(Abkhaz alphabet) Historically: Latin, GeorgianOfficial statusOfficial language inRepublic of Abkhazia;[a] Autonomous Republic of Abkhazia, GeorgiaLanguage codesISO 639-1 ab AbkhazianISO 639-2 abk AbkhazianISO 639-3 abk AbkhazianGlottolog abkh1244  Abkhazian[2]Abkhaz (/æbˈkɑːz/;[3] /æpˈhɑːz/;[4] sometimes spelled Abxaz; Аԥсуа бызшәа /apʰswa bɨzʃʷa/), also known as Abkhazian,[2][5][6] is a Northwest Caucasian language most closely related to Abaza. It is spoken mostly by the Abkhaz people. It is one of the official languages of Abkhazia[a], where around 100,000 people speak it.[1] Furthermore, it is spoken by thousands of members of the Abkhazian diaspora in Turkey, Georgia's autonomous republic of Adjara, Syria, Jordan
Jordan
and several Western countries
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Romanian Leu
The Romanian leu
Romanian leu
(Romanian pronunciation: [lew], plural lei [lej]; ISO 4217
ISO 4217
code RON; numeric code 946) is the currency of Romania. It is subdivided into 100 bani (Romanian pronunciation: [banʲ], singular: ban, Romanian pronunciation: [ban])
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Currency
A currency (from Middle English: curraunt, "in circulation", from Latin: currens, -entis), in the most specific use of the word, refers to money in any form when in actual use or circulation as a medium of exchange, especially circulating banknotes and coins.[1][2] A more general definition is that a currency is a system of money (monetary units) in common use, especially in a nation.[3] Under this definition, US dollars, British pounds, Australian dollars, and European euros are examples of currency. These various currencies are recognized stores of value and are traded between nations in foreign exchange markets, which determine the relative values of the different currencies.[4] Currencies in this sense are defined by governments, and each type has limited boundaries of acceptance. Other definitions of the term "currency" are discussed in their respective synonymous articles banknote, coin, and money
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Bulgarian Lev
lev – kint ; 1,000 leva – bon [1]Banknotes Freq. used 2, 5, 10, 20, 50 leva Rarely used 1, 100 levaCoins 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50 stotinki, 1, 2 levaDemographicsUser(s)  BulgariaIssuanceCentral bank Bulgarian National Bank Website www.bnb.bgMint Bulgarian Mint Website www.mint.bgValuationPegged with euro = 1.95583 levaThe lev (Bulgarian: лев, plural: лева, левове / leva,[2] levove) is the currency of Bulgaria. It is divided in 100 stotinki (стотинки, singular: stotinka, стотинка). In archaic Bulgarian the word "lev" meant "lion", a word which in the modern language became lăv (IPA: /lɤf/) (in Bulgarian: лъв)
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Czech Koruna
The koruna (sign: Kč or ,-; code: CZK) is the currency of the Czech Republic since 1993, and in English it is sometimes referred to as Czech crown. The koruna is one of European Union's 11 currencies, and the Czech Republic
Czech Republic
is legally bound to adopt the euro currency in the future. The official name in Czech is koruna česká (plural koruny české, though the zero-grade genitive plural form korun českých is used on banknotes and coins of value 5 Kč or higher). The ISO 4217
ISO 4217
code is CZK and the local acronym is Kč, which is placed after the numeric value (e.g., "50 Kč") or sometimes before it (as is seen on the 10-koruna coin). One koruna equals 100 haléřů (abbreviated as "h", singular: haléř, nominative plural: haléře, genitive plural: haléřů – used with numbers higher or equal to 5 – e.g
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Danish Krone
The krone (Danish pronunciation: [ˈkʁoːnə]; plural: kroner; sign: kr.; code: DKK) is the official currency of Denmark, Greenland and the Faroe Islands, introduced on 1 January 1875.[3] Both the ISO code "DKK" and currency sign "kr." are in common use; the former precedes the value, the latter in some contexts follows it. The currency is sometimes referred to as the Danish crown in English, since krone literally means crown. Historically, krone coins have been minted in Denmark
Denmark
since the 17th century. One krone is subdivided into 100 øre (Danish pronunciation: [ˈøːɐ]; singular and plural), the name øre possibly deriving from Latin aureus meaning "gold coin".[4] Altogether there are eleven denominations of the krone, with the smallest being the 50 øre coin, which is valued at one half of a krone
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Gibraltar Pound
The Gibraltar
Gibraltar
pound (currency sign: £; banking code: GIP) is the currency of Gibraltar. It is pegged to – and exchangeable with – the British pound
British pound
sterling at par value. Gibraltar
Gibraltar
pound coins are minted notes printed by the Government of Gibraltar.[1]Contents1 History 2 Relationship with the British pound 3 Coins3.1 Tercentenary edition4 Banknotes 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Main article: Gibraltar
Gibraltar
real Until 1872, the currency situation in Gibraltar
Gibraltar
was complicated, with a system based on the real being employed which encompassed British, Spanish and Gibraltarian coins. From 1825, the real (actually the Spanish real
Spanish real
de plata) was tied to the pound at the rate of 1 Spanish dollar to 4 shillings 4 pence (equivalent to 21.67 pence today)
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Hungarian Forint
The forint (sign: Ft; code: HUF) is the currency of Hungary. It was formerly divided into 100 fillér, but fillér coins are no longer in circulation. The introduction of the forint on 1 August 1946 was a crucial step in the post- World War II
World War II
stabilization of the Hungarian economy, and the currency remained relatively stable until the 1980s. Transition to a market economy in the early 1990s adversely affected the value of the forint; inflation peaked at 35% in 1991
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Polish Złoty
The zloty (pronounced [ˈzwɔtɨ] ( listen);[2] sign: zł; code: PLN), which is the masculine form of the Polish adjective 'golden', is the currency of Poland. The modern złoty is subdivided into 100 groszy (singular: grosz; alternative plural form: grosze). The recognized English form of the word is zloty, plural zloty or zlotys.[3] The currency sign, zł, is composed of the Polish lower-case letters z and ł (Unicode: U+007A z LATIN SMALL LETTER z & U+0142 ł LATIN SMALL LETTER L WITH STROKE). As a result of inflation in the early 1990s, the currency underwent redenomination. Thus, on 1 January 1995, 10,000 old złotych (PLZ) became one new złoty (PLN)
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Swedish Krona
The krona (Swedish: [²kruːna]; plural: kronor; sign: kr; code: SEK) has been the currency of Sweden
Sweden
since 1873. Both the ISO code "SEK" and currency sign "kr" are in common use; the former precedes or follows the value, the latter usually follows it but, especially in the past, it sometimes preceded the value. In English, the currency is sometimes referred to as the Swedish crown, as krona literally means crown in Swedish. The Swedish krona
Swedish krona
was the 9th most traded currency in the world by value in April 2016.[3] One krona is subdivided into 100 öre (singular and plural; when referring to the currency unit itself, however, the plural definite form is ören)
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Saint Petersburg Mint
Saint Petersburg
Saint Petersburg
Mint (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́ргский моне́тный двор) is one of the world's largest mints. It was founded by Peter the Great in 1724 on the territory of Peter and Paul Fortress, so it is one of the oldest industrial enterprises in Saint Petersburg. It is a part of the Goznak
Goznak
State-owned corporation. External links[edit]Шишанов В. А. К истории создания Банковского монетного двора // Хранитель Эрмитажа: Сборник воспоминаний и научных статей к 100-летию со дня рождения И. Г. Спасского. СПб.: Изд-во Гос. Эрмитажа, 2004
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Albanian Lek
The lek (Albanian: Leku Shqiptar; plural lekë) (sign: L; code: ALL) is the official currency of Albania. It is subdivided into 100 qindarka (singular qindarkë), although qindarka are no longer issued.Contents1 History1.1 Etymology 1.2 Franga2 Coins2.1 First lek 2.2 Second lek 2.3 Third lek2.3.1 Commemorative coins3 Banknotes3.1 First lek 3.2 Second lek 3.3 Third lek3.3.1 1992 series 3.3.2 1996 series4 Exchange rates 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
on the first Albanian 1 lek coin.The lek was introduced as the first Albanian currency in February 1926.[1] Before then, Albania
Albania
was a country without a currency, adhering to a gold standard for the fixation of commercial values
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Bosnia And Herzegovina Convertible Mark
The Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
convertible mark (Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian: konvertibilna marka, Cyrillic: конвертибилна марка) is the currency of Bosnia and Herzegovina. It is divided into 100 pfenigs or fenings (Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian: pfenig/fening; Cyrillic: пфениг/фенинг), and locally abbreviated KM.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Etymology1.1.1 Plurals and cases2 Coins 3 Banknotes3.1 Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
issues 3.2 Republika Srpska
Republika Srpska
issues 3.3 Nationwide issues4 Exchange rates 5 Mistakes5.1 Examples6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] The convertible mark was established by the 1995 Dayton Agreement
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Macedonian Denar
The denar (Macedonian: денар; paucal: denari / денари) is the currency of Republic of Macedonia.Contents1 History1.1 Etymology2 First denar (1992–1993)2.1 History 2.2 Coins 2.3 Banknotes2.3.1 Production 2.3.2 Design2.4 Exchange rates3 Second denar (1993–present)3.1 Coins3.1.1 FAO
FAO
coinage (1995)3.2 Banknotes 3.3 Exchange rates4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The first Macedonian denar
Macedonian denar
was established on 26 April 1992.[1] It replaced the 1990 version of the Yugoslav dinar
Yugoslav dinar
at par. In May 1993, the currency was reformed. A new denar was introduced, with one new denar being equal to 100 old denari. Etymology[edit] The name denar comes from the name of the ancient Roman monetary unit, the denarius
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Maltese Scudo
The scudo (plural scudi) is the official currency of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta
Malta
and was the currency of Malta
Malta
during the rule of the Order over Malta, which ended in 1798. It is subdivided into 12 tarì (singular tarì), each of 20 grani (singular grano) with 6 piccoli (singular piccolo) to the grano. It is pegged to the euro (at a rate of 1 scudo to €0.24).[1] History[edit] The scudo was first minted in Rhodes
Rhodes
in 1318. By 1500 the coins had the distinctive characteristics of a cross and the Order's and Grandmaster's coat of arms on one side, and the head of St. John the Baptist on the other. The scudo was first minted in Malta
Malta
during the reign of Piero de Ponte. The quality of the coins improved especially during the reign of António Manoel de Vilhena
António Manoel de Vilhena
in the early 18th century
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