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Abiathar
Abiathar (Hebrew: אֶבְיָתָר‎ ’Eḇyāṯār, "the father is great"), in the Hebrew Bible, son of Ahimelech
Ahimelech
or Ahijah, High Priest at Nob,[1] the fourth in descent from Eli (1 Sam. 23:6) and the last of Eli's House. The only one of the priests to escape from Saul's massacre, he fled to David at Keilah, taking with him the ephod and other priestly regalia (1 Sam. 22:20 f., 23:6, 9). He was of great service to David, especially at the time of the rebellion of Absalom (2 Sam. 15:24, 29, 35, 20:25). In 1 Kings 4:4 Zadok
Zadok
and Abiathar are found acting together as priests under Solomon. In 1 Kings 1:7, 19, 25, however, Abiathar appears as a supporter of Adonijah, and in 2:22 and 26 it is said that he was deposed by Solomon
Solomon
and banished to Anathoth. In 2 Sam
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Eviatar Banai
Eviatar Banai (also spelled Evyatar or (incorrectly) Evitar; Hebrew: אביתר בנאי‎; born February 8, 1973) is an Israeli musician, singer and songwriter.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Career2 Discography 3 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Banai was born in 1973 in Beersheba. The extended Banai family is notable as an outstanding family of Israeli artists; Eviatar is the younger brother of the actress Orna Banai and the singer and songwriter Meir Banai, although their father, Yitzhak Banai, was a judge. Banai studied cinema in high school. He also studied piano for eight years. While serving in the Israel Defense Forces he directed and wrote the screenplay and music for a comedy film called Six that was shown on Israel's Channel 1. Career[edit] After his military service in the IDF Banai lived and worked in a kibbutz in the Golan Heights. There he wrote a play, which he hoped to stage in Tel Aviv
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Adullam
Adullam
Adullam
(Hebrew: עֲדֻלָּם‬) is an ancient ruin, formerly known by the Arabic appellation ʿAīd el Mâ (or `Eîd el Mieh), built upon a hilltop overlooking the Elah Valley, south of Bet Shemesh in Israel. In the late 19th century, the town was still in ruins.[1] The hilltop ruin is also known by the name Khurbet esh-Sheikh Madkour, named after Madkour, one of the sons of the Sultan Beder, for whom is built a shrine (wely) and formerly called by its inhabitants Wely Madkour.[2] The hilltop is mostly flat, with cisterns carved into the rock. The remains of stone structures which once stood there can still be seen. Sedimentary layers of ruins from the old Canaanite and Israelite eras, mostly potsherds, are noticeable everywhere, although olive groves now grow atop of this hill, enclosed within stone hedges. The villages of Aderet, Neve Michael/Roglit, and Aviezer
Aviezer
are located nearby
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Hebrew Language
Hebrew (/ˈhiːbruː/; עִבְרִית, Ivrit [ʔivˈʁit] ( listen) or [ʕivˈɾit] ( listen)) is a Northwest Semitic language native to Israel, spoken by over 9 million people worldwide.[8][9] Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites
Israelites
and their ancestors, although the language was not referred to by the name Hebrew in the Tanakh.[note 1] The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date from the 10th century BCE.[10] Hebrew belongs to the West Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family
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Israel
Coordinates: 31°N 35°E / 31°N 35°E / 31; 35State of Israelמְדִינַת יִשְׂרָאֵל (Hebrew) دَوْلَة إِسْرَائِيل (Arabic)FlagEmblemAnthem: "Hatikvah" (Hebrew for "The Hope")(pre-) 1967 border (Green Line)Capital and largest city Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(limited recognition)[fn 1] 31°47′N 35°13′E / 31.783°N 35.217°E / 31.783; 35.217Official languagesHebrew ArabicEthnic groups (2017)74.7% Jewish 20.8% Arab 4.5% other[5]Religion (2016)74.7% Jewish 17.7% Muslim
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Christianity
Christianity[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic[1] religion based on the life, teachings, and miracles of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, known by Christians
Christians
as the Christ, or "Messiah", who is the focal point of the Christian
Christian
faiths
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5] Other works are actively dedicated
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Mtskheta
Mtskheta
Mtskheta
(Georgian: მცხეთა [mtsʰxɛtʰɑ]) is a city in Mtskheta-Mtianeti
Mtskheta-Mtianeti
province of Georgia. One of the oldest cities of Georgia, it is located approximately 20 kilometres (12 miles) north of Tbilisi
Tbilisi
at the confluence of the Aragvi
Aragvi
river. Due to its historical significance and several cultural monuments, the "Historical Monuments of Mtskheta" became a UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site in 1994
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Jewish
Jews
Jews
(Hebrew: יְהוּדִים‬ ISO 259-3 Yehudim, Israeli pronunciation [jehuˈdim]) or Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group[12] and a nation[13][14][15] originating from the Israelites,[16][17][18] or Hebrews,[19][20] of the Ancient Near East. Jewish ethnicity, nationhood, and religion are strongly interrelated,[21] as
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Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
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Encyclopedia Biblica
Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political and Religion History, the Archeology, Geography and Natural History of the Bible
Bible
(1899), edited by Thomas Kelly Cheyne
Thomas Kelly Cheyne
and J. Sutherland Black, is a critical encyclopedia of the Bible. In Theology/Biblical studies, it is often referenced as Enc. Bib., or as Cheyne and Black.An image illustrating the article 'Ethiopia' – one of the Nubian pyramids at MeroeIt has an article for every single name and place both in the Bible and in its traditional Apocrypha, as well as for each of the books of these, together with many improper nouns appearing in these (such as 'nebi'im', 'mole', 'owl') and other more general subjects (such as 'music', 'tents', etc.)
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Solomon
Solomon
Solomon
(/ˈsɒləmən/; Hebrew: שְׁלֹמֹה‬, Shlomoh),[a] also called Jedidiah (Hebrew יְדִידְיָהּ‬ Yədidya), was, according to the Hebrew Bible,[3] Quran, Hadith
Hadith
and Hidden Words,[4] a fabulously wealthy and wise king of Israel who succeeded his father, King David.[5] The conventional dates of Solomon's reign are circa 970 to 931 BCE, normally given in alignment with the dates of David's reign. He is described as the third king of the United Monarchy, which would break apart into the northern Kingdom of Israel and the southern Kingdom of Judah
Kingdom of Judah
shortly after his death
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Israelites
The Israelites
Israelites
(/ˈɪzriəˌlaɪtsˌ/; Hebrew: בני ישראל‎ Bnei Yisra'el)[1] were a confederation of Iron Age
Iron Age
Semitic-speaking tribes of the ancient Near East, who inhabited a part of Canaan
Canaan
during the tribal and monarchic periods.[2][3][4][5][6] According to the religious narrative of the Hebrew Bible, the Israelites' origin is traced back to the Biblical patriarchs and matriarchs Abraham
Abraham
and his wife Sarah, through their son Isaac
Isaac
and his wife Rebecca, and their son Jacob
Jacob
who was later called Israel, from whence they derive their name, with his wives Leah
Leah
and Rachel. Modern archaeology has largely discarded the historicity of the religious narrative,[7] with it being reframed as constituting an inspiring national myth narrative
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Kingdom Of Judah
The Kingdom of Judah
Kingdom of Judah
(Hebrew: מַמְלֶכֶת יְהוּדָה‬, Mamlekhet Yehudāh) was an Iron Age
Iron Age
kingdom of the Southern Levant. The Hebrew
Hebrew
Bible
Bible
depicts it as the successor to a United Monarchy, but historians are divided about the veracity of this account
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Eviatar Zerubavel
Eviatar Zerubavel (born 1948) is professor of sociology at Rutgers University and a prolific and notable writer on the sociology of cognition and everyday life, including topics such as time, boundaries, and categorization. Biography[edit] Born in Israel in 1948 to parents in diplomatic service, he spent much of his childhood abroad. He studied first at the University of Tel Aviv and then received his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1976, where he studied under Erving Goffman. After teaching at Columbia University and the State University of New York at Stony Brook, he has spent the bulk of his career at Rutgers University. In 2003 he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, and in 2007 he was recognized as a Board of Governors and Distinguished Professor of Sociology. Zerubavel's first notable contributions were in the study of time, particularly the sociology and standardization of time
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Eviatar Manor
Eviatar Manor (born 1949) is a retired Israeli diplomat. He was the Permanent Representative of Israel to the United Nations in Geneva from 2012[1] to 2016.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Diplomatic career 3 See also 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] Eviatar Manor was born in Tel Aviv. He graduated from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Economics and International Relations. He also holds a Diploma in the Studies of the Economics of European Integration from the College of Europe, Bruges, Belgium (cum laude). He is married to Orly Manor, a professor. They have two sons, Oren and Ilan. Diplomatic career[edit] Eviatar Manor joined the Israeli diplomatic service in 1973
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