HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Aberdeen Proving Ground
Aberdeen Proving Ground
Aberdeen Proving Ground
(APG) (sometimes erroneously called Aberdeen Proving Grounds) is a United States Army
United States Army
facility located adjacent to Aberdeen, Maryland
Aberdeen, Maryland
(in Harford County). Part of the facility is a census-designated place (CDP), which had a population of 3,116 at the 2000 census, and 2,093 at the 2010 census.Contents1 History 2 Edgewood Arsenal 3 Other component locations within Aberdeen Proving Ground 4 Geography 5 Demographics 6 Contamination 7 Controversies 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit] APG is the U.S. Army's oldest active proving ground, established on October 20, 1917, six months after the U.S. entered World War I.[1][2] Its location allowed design and testing of ordnance materiel to take place near contemporary industrial and shipping centers
[...More...]

"Aberdeen Proving Ground" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

3-Quinuclidinyl Benzilate
3-Quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) — IUPAC name 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octan-3-yl hydroxy(diphenyl)acetate; US Army code EA-2277; NATO code BZ; Soviet code Substance 78 — is an odorless military incapacitating agent.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Invention and research 1.2 Alleged use 1.3 Popular culture2 Physiochemical characteristics 3 Mechanism of action 4 Detection and protection 5 Synthesis 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Invention and research[edit] BZ was invented by the Swiss pharmaceutical company Hoffman-LaRoche in 1951.[2] The company was investigating anti-spasmodic agents, similar to tropine, for treating gastrointestinal ailments when the chemical was discovered.[2] It was then investigated for possible use in ulcer treatment, but was found unsuitable
[...More...]

"3-Quinuclidinyl Benzilate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Organophosphorus Compound
Organophosphorus compounds are organic compounds containing phosphorus.[1] They are used primarily in pest control as an alternative to chlorinated hydrocarbons that persist in the environment. These compounds are highly effective insecticides, though some are also lethal to humans at minuscule doses (nerve gas) and include some of the most toxic substances ever created by man, including sarin and VX nerve agents.[2] Organophosphorus chemistry is the corresponding science of the properties and reactivity of organophosphorus compounds. Phosphorus, like nitrogen, is in group 15 of the periodic table, and thus phosphorus compounds and nitrogen compounds have many similar properties.[3][4][5] The definition of organophosphorus compounds is variable, which can lead to confusion
[...More...]

"Organophosphorus Compound" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Atropine
Atropine
Atropine
is a medication to treat certain types of nerve agent and pesticide poisonings as well as some types of slow heart rate and to decrease saliva production during surgery.[3] It is typically given intravenously or by injection into a muscle.[3] Eye drops are also available which are used to treat uveitis and early amblyopia.[4] The intravenous solution usually begins working within a minute and lasts half an hour to an hour.[2] Large doses may be required to treat some poisonings.[3] Common side effects include a dry mouth, large pupils, urinary retention, constipation, and a fast heart rate.[3] It should gene
[...More...]

"Atropine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hyoscine Hydrobromide
Hyoscine, also known as scopolamine,[2] is a medication used to treat motion sickness and postoperative nausea and vomiting.[3] It is also sometimes used before surgery to decrease saliva.[3] When used by injection, effects begin after about 20 minutes and last for up to 8 hours.[3] It may also be used by mouth and as a dermal patch.[3] Common side effects include sleepiness, blurred vision, dilated pupils, and dry mouth.[3] It is not recommended in people with glaucoma or bowel obstruction.[3] It is unclear if use during pregnancy is safe; however, it appears to be safe during breastfeeding.[4] Hyoscine
Hyoscine
is in the antimuscarinic famil
[...More...]

"Hyoscine Hydrobromide" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

2-PAM Chloride
Pralidoxime (2-pyridine aldoxime methyl chloride) or 2-PAM, usually as the chloride or iodide salts, belongs to a family of compounds called oximes that bind to organophosphate-inactivated acetylcholinesterase.[1] It is used to combat poisoning by organophosphates[2] or acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (nerve agents) in conjunction with atropine and diazepam. It is a white solid.Contents1 Chemical synthesis 2 Mechanism of action 3 Dosage 4 Interactions 5 Contraindications 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksChemical synthesis[edit] Pralidoxime, 2-pyridinaldoxime methylchloride, is prepared by treating pyridine-2-carboxaldehyde with hydroxylamine
[...More...]

"2-PAM Chloride" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

LSD
Lysergic acid
Lysergic acid
diethylamide (LSD), also known as acid, is a psychedelic drug known for its psychological effects, which may include altered awareness of one's surroundings, perceptions, and feelings as well as sensations and images that seem real though they are not.[11] It is used mainly as a recreational drug and for spiritual reasons. LSD
LSD
is typically either swallowed or held under the tongue.[11] It is often sold on blotter paper, a sugar cube, or gelatin. It can also be injected. LSD
LSD
is not usually addictive.[11][12] However, adverse psychiatric reactions such as anxiety, paranoia, and delusions are possible.[7] LSD
LSD
is in the ergoline family. LSD
LSD
is sensitive to oxygen, ultraviolet light, and chlorine,[13] though it may last for years if it is stored away from light and moisture at low temperature
[...More...]

"LSD" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Phencyclidine
Phencyclidine
Phencyclidine
(PCP), also known as angel dust among other names, is a drug used for its mind altering effects.[5] PCP may cause hallucinations, distorted perceptions of sounds, and violent behavior.[7][8] As a recreational drug, it is typically smoked, but may be taken by mouth, snorted, or injected.[7][4] It may also be mixed with cannabis or tobacco.[5] Adverse effects may include seizures, coma, addiction, and an increased risk of suicide.[7] Flashbacks may oc
[...More...]

"Phencyclidine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cannabinoids
A cannabinoid is one of a class of diverse chemical compounds that acts on cannabinoid receptors in cells that alter neurotransmitter release in the brain. Ligands for these receptor proteins include the endocannabinoids (produced naturally in the body by animals),[1] the phytocannabinoids (found in cannabis and some other plants), and synthetic cannabinoids (manufactured artificially)
[...More...]

"Cannabinoids" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Agent Orange
Agent Orange
Agent Orange
is a herbicide and defoliant chemical, one of the tactical use Rainbow Herbicides. It is widely known for its use by the U.S. military as part of its herbicidal warfare program, Operation Ranch Hand,[1] during the Vietnam War
Vietnam War
from 1961 to 1971.[2] It is a mixture of equal parts of two herbicides, 2,4,5-T
2,4,5-T
and 2,4-D
[...More...]

"Agent Orange" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

VX (nerve Agent)
VX is an extremely toxic synthetic chemical compound in the organophosphorus class, specifically, a thiophosphonate. In the class of nerve agents, it was developed for military use in chemical warfare after translation of earlier discoveries of organophosphate toxicity in pesticide research. In its pure form, VX is an oily, relatively non-volatile liquid with an amber-like color.[4] Because of its low volatility, VX persists in environments where it is dispersed.[5] VX, short for "venomous agent X",[6] is the best known of Tammelin's esters, named for the member of the Swedish National Defence Research Institute who first studied them. Now one of a broader V-series of agents, they are classified as nerve agents and have been used as a chemical weapon in various recorded deadly attacks. VX fatalities occur with exposure to tens of milligram quantities via inhalation or absorption through skin; VX is thus more potent than sarin, another nerve agent with a similar mechanism of action
[...More...]

"VX (nerve Agent)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

National Register Of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
(NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. The passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966 established the National Register and the process for adding properties to it. Of the more than one million properties on the National Register, 80,000 are listed individually
[...More...]

"National Register Of Historic Places" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Grade (slope)
The grade (also called slope, incline, gradient, mainfall, pitch or rise) of a physical feature, landform or constructed line refers to the tangent of the angle of that surface to the horizontal. It is a special case of the slope, where zero indicates horizontality. A larger number indicates higher or steeper degree of "tilt". Often slope is calculated as a ratio of "rise" to "run", or as a fraction ("rise over run") in which run is the horizontal distance and rise is the vertical distance. The grades or slopes of existing physical features such as canyons and hillsides, stream and river banks and beds are often described. Grades are typically specified for new linear constructions (such as roads, landscape grading, roof pitches, railroads, aqueducts, and pedestrian or bicycle circulation routes)
[...More...]

"Grade (slope)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Internal Combustion Engine
An internal combustion engine (ICE) is a heat engine where the combustion of a fuel occurs with an oxidizer (usually air) in a combustion chamber that is an integral part of the working fluid flow circuit. In an internal combustion engine, the expansion of the high-temperature and high-pressure gases produced by combustion applies direct force to some component of the engine. The force is applied typically to pistons, turbine blades, rotor or a nozzle
[...More...]

"Internal Combustion Engine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Powertrain
In a motor vehicle, the term powertrain or powerplant describes the main components that generate power and deliver it to the road surface, water, or air. This includes the engine, transmission, drive shafts, differentials, and the final drive (drive wheels, continuous track as in military tanks or caterpillar tractors, propeller, etc.). More recently in hybrid powertrains the battery, the electric motor and the control algorithm are also seen as elements of the powertrain. A motor vehicle's driveline or drivetrain consists of the parts of the powertrain excluding the engine. It is the portion of a vehicle, after the prime mover, that changes depending on whether a vehicle is front-wheel, rear-wheel, or four-wheel drive, or less-common six-wheel or eight-wheel drive. In a wider sense, the powertrain includes all of its components used to transform stored (chemical, solar, nuclear, kinetic, potential, etc.) energy into kinetic energy for propulsion purposes
[...More...]

"Powertrain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.