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Abbey Of Balmerino
Balmerino
Balmerino
Abbey, or St Edward's Abbey, in Balmerino, Fife, Scotland, was a Cistercian
Cistercian
monastic community founded in 1227 to 1229 by monks from Melrose Abbey
Melrose Abbey
with the patronage of Ermengarde de Beaumont and King Alexander II of Scotland. It remained a daughter house of Melrose. It had approximately 20 monks at the beginning of the sixteenth century, but declined in that century. In December 1547 it was burned by an English force, and allegedly damaged again in 1559 by Scottish Protestants
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Religious Order
A religious order is a lineage of communities and organizations of people who live in some way set apart from society in accordance with their specific religious devotion, usually characterized by the principles of its founder's religious practice. The order is composed of laypeople and, in some orders, clergy
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Soulseat Abbey
Saulseat or Soulseat Abbey
Soulseat Abbey
was a Premonstratensian monastic community located in Wigtownshire, Galloway, in the Gaelic-speaking south-west of Scotland. It was regarded as the first and the senior Premonstratensian house in the Kingdom of Scotland. There is some evidence that Soulseat Abbey
Soulseat Abbey
is Viride Stagnum ("green loch"), that is, the Cistercian monastery founded by St Malachy
St Malachy
somewhere in Galloway
Galloway
in 1148. The name comes from the Gaelic word Sabhal, a word with many religious and monastic connotations
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Newbattle Abbey
Newbattle
Newbattle
Abbey was a Cistercian
Cistercian
monastery near the village of Newbattle
Newbattle
in Midlothian, Scotland, which has subsequently become a stately home and then an educational institution.Contents1 Monastery 2 Stately Home 3 College 4 Burials at the Abbey 5 See also 6 ReferencesMonastery[edit] It was founded in 1140 by monks from Melrose Abbey. The patron was King David I of Scotland
David I of Scotland
(with his son Henry). Its church was dedicated in 1234. The abbey was burned by English royal forces in 1385 and once more in 1544
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Holmcultram Abbey
Holmcultram Abbey
Holmcultram Abbey
(alternatively Holm Cultram Abbey or Holme Cultram Abbey) was a Cistercian
Cistercian
monastery in what is now the village of Abbeytown
Abbeytown
in Cumbria, United Kingdom. It was founded in 1150 and dissolved in 1538. After the dissolution the church continued to be used as the parish church.Contents1 Foundation and Scots connections 2 History of the Abbey 3 Dissolution 4 Buildings 5 Fire and restoration 6 Burials 7 See also 8 Sources and references 9 External linksFoundation and Scots connections[edit] The abbey was founded in 1150 by Cistercian
Cistercian
monks from Melrose Abbey on land given by Alan of Allerdale.[1] The land was in territory held by Scotland at the time, and the grant of land was confirmed by Prince Henry
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Kinloss Abbey
Kinloss
Kinloss
Abbey
Abbey
is a Cistercian
Cistercian
abbey at Kinloss
Kinloss
in the county of Moray, Scotland. The abbey was founded in 1150 by King David I and was first colonised by monks from Melrose Abbey. It received its Papal Bull from Pope Alexander III in 1174, and later came under the protection of the Bishop of Moray
Moray
in 1187. The abbey went on to become one of the largest and wealthiest religious houses in Scotland, receiving the valuable salmon fishing rights on the River Findhorn
River Findhorn
from Robert the Bruce in 1312, subsequently renewed by James I and James IV. During its history the abbey has received many royal visitors, including Edward I in 1303, Edward III in 1336 and Mary, Queen of Scots, in 1562. The most renowned of the 24 abbots the monastery had was Robert Reid
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Coupar Angus Abbey
Coupar Angus Abbey was a Cistercian monastery near Coupar Angus, in central Scotland, on the boundary between Angus and Gowrie. It was founded on the old royal manor of Coupar in 1161 x 1162 with the patronage of Máel Coluim IV ("Malcolm IV"), King of Scots, by Cistercian monks from Melrose Abbey. It became an abbey of medium to large size and wealth and enjoyed more than four centuries of monastic life before it was turned into a secular lordship for James Elphinstone, by parliament in 1606 and by royal charter in 1607. Today, there are almost no remains of the abbey, much of it being burned by the Protestant reformers. A collection of its charters has survived. There are some remnants of a gatehouse, and some fine fragmentary stonework from the Abbey (notably a number of tombs) are preserved in the parish church, which stands on or near the site of the medieval building
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Dundrennan Abbey
Dundrennan Abbey, in Dundrennan, Scotland, near to Kirkcudbright, was a Cistercian
Cistercian
monastery in the Romanesque architectural style, established in 1142 by Fergus of Galloway, King David I of Scotland (1124–53), and monks from Rievaulx Abbey. Though extensively ruined (the transepts are the main surviving parts), Dundrennan is noted for the purity and restraint of its architecture, reflecting the austere Cistercian
Cistercian
ideal. It is also built from very hard-weathering grey sandstone, so the original architectural forms and mouldings are well preserved. Mary, Queen of Scots, after the Battle of Langside, spent her final night in Scotland
Scotland
here, in 1568
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Glenluce Abbey
Glenluce
Glenluce
Abbey,[1] near to Glenluce, Scotland, was a Cistercian monastery called also Abbey
Abbey
of Luce or Vallis Lucis [2] and founded around 1190 by Rolland or Lochlann, Lord of Galloway and Constable of Scotland. Following the Scottish Reformation
Scottish Reformation
in 1560, the abbey fell into disuse.Contents1 Glenluce
Glenluce
and the Kennedy family 2 See also 3 References 4 External links Glenluce
Glenluce
and the Kennedy family[edit]Pl.2. The abbey ruins in 1789 Gilbert Kennedy, 4th Earl of Cassilis obtained control of Glenluce during the reign of Mary, Queen of Scots. The Earl persuaded one of the monks of the abbey to counterfeit the necessary signatures to a deed conveying the lands of the abbey to him and his heirs
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Sweetheart Abbey
The Abbey of Dulce Cor, better known as Sweetheart Abbey
Sweetheart Abbey
(Gd: An Abaid Ur), or New Abbey
New Abbey
Pow, was a Cistercian
Cistercian
monastery founded in 1275 in what is now the town of New Abbey, Dumfries
Dumfries
and Galloway, 8 miles (13 km) south of Dumfries, near to the Nith in south-west Scotland. It was suppressed in 1624.Contents1 History1.1 Founding 1.2 Vicissitudes 1.3 Suppression2 Burials 3 Current status 4 References 5 See alsoHistory[edit] Founding[edit] The abbey, located on the banks of the River Pow, was founded by Dervorguilla of Galloway, daughter of Alan, Lord of Galloway, in memory of her husband, Baron John de Balliol. After his death, she kept his embalmed heart, contained in a casket of ivory and silver, with her for the rest of her life, and it was buried alongside her when she died
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Cîteaux Abbey
Cîteaux Abbey
Abbey
(French: Abbaye de Cîteaux) is a Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
abbey located in Saint-Nicolas-lès-Cîteaux, south of Dijon, France.[1] Today it belongs to the Trappists, or Cistercians
Cistercians
of the Strict Observance (OCSO). Cîteaux, formerly spelled Cisteaux, is the mother house of the Cistercian
Cistercian
order. The abbey has about 35 members.[year needed] The monks produce a cheese branded under the abbey's name, as well as caramels and honey-based candies.Contents1 History 2 Other burials 3 References 4 External links4.1 PicturesHistory[edit] Further information: Cistercians16th-century perspective view of the abbey (engraving)Cîteaux Abbey
Abbey
was founded on Saint Benedict's Day, 21 March 1098,[2] by a group of monks from Molesme Abbey
Abbey
seeking to follow more closely the Rule of St. Benedict
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Saddell Abbey
Saddell Abbey was a Cistercian monastery in Argyll, Scotland, founded in 1207 by Ragnall, son of Somairle mac Gille Brigte and peopled by monks from Mellifont Abbey in Ireland. Somerled's descendants, the MacDonalds, Lords of the Isles, continued to be patrons of Saddell abbey. Monastic life seems to have come to an end when James IV of Scotland forfeited the Lordship of the Isles. It was proposed to the Pope that the bishopric of Argyll should be moved from Lismore to Saddell as the former was in ruins. Nothing ever came of the idea, but the Bishops of Argyll did sometimes take the title "Commendator of Saddell". The remains of the abbey complex is now a scheduled ancient monument. [1]Contents1 See also 2 References 3 Bibliography 4 External linksSee also[edit]Abbot of Saddell Kildonald Bay Saddell CastleReferences[edit]^ "Saddell AbbeySM3645". Historic environment Scotland. Retrieved 6 September 2017. Bibliography[edit]Ian B. Cowan and David E
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List Of Religious Houses In Scotland
List of monastic houses in Scotland is a catalogue of the abbeys, priories, friaries and other monastic religious houses of Scotland. In this article alien houses are included, as are smaller establishments such as cells and notable monastic granges (particularly those with resident monks)
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Culross Abbey
Culross
Culross
Abbey
Abbey
is a former Cistercian
Cistercian
abbey in Culross, Scotland, headed by the Abbot or Commendator of Culross. Part of it is still used as the local parish church by the Church of Scotland.Contents1 History 2 Current use 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The abbey was founded in 1217 by Malcolm I, Mormaer or Earl of Fife, and was first colonised by monks from Kinloss Abbey. Culross
Culross
may have been chosen to establish an abbey because this was the birthplace of Saint Mungo
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Deer Abbey
Deer Abbey
Deer Abbey
was a Cistercian
Cistercian
monastery in Buchan, Scotland.[1] It was founded by 1219 AD with the patronage William Comyn, jure uxoris Earl of Buchan,[2] who is also buried there. There was an earlier community of Scottish monks or priests. The notitiae on the margins of the Book of Deer record grants made to the Scottish religious community in the 12th century and a claim that it was founded by Saint Columba
Columba
and Saint Drostan.[3] The old religious community was probably absorbed by the new foundation. The history of the abbey after the 1210s is obscure until the 16th century, when it was beginning to be secularized. The abbey was turned into a secular lordship for Commendator Robert Keith II (becoming Lord Altrie) in 1587. The Abbey was included in the lands obtained by Lord Pitfour and became part of the Pitfour estate
Pitfour estate
in 1766
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Sancta Maria Abbey, Nunraw
Nunraw Abbey or Sancta Maria Abbey, Nunraw is a working Trappist (Ordo Cisterciensis Strictioris Observantiae) monastery. It was the first Cistercian house to be founded in Scotland since the Reformation. Founded in 1946 by monks from Mount St. Joseph Abbey, Roscrea, Ireland, and consecrated as an Abbey in 1948, it nestles at the foot of the Lammermuir Hills on the southern edge of East Lothian. The estate of the abbey is technically called White Castle after an early hill-fort on the land.Contents1 History 2 List of Abbots 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Originally owned by the Cistercian Nuns of Haddington, the area that they settled becoming known as Nunraw (lit. Nun's Row). The Nunnery of Haddington was founded by Ada de Warenne, Countess of Huntingdon and daughter of the Earl of Surrey, soon after the death of St
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