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Abanico Formation
Abanico Formation (Spanish: Formación Abanico) is a 3 kilometres (9,800 ft) thick sedimentary formation exposed in the Andes
Andes
of Central Chile.[1] The formation has been deposited in a timespan from the Eocene
Eocene
to the Miocene. Abanico Formation's contact with the overlying Miocene
Miocene
Farellones Formation has been the subject of differing interpretations since the 1960s.[2] The sediments accumulated in the Abanico Extensional Basin within a context of the Andean orogeny. The basin had a north-south elongated shape that spanned the latitudes of 29–38° S
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Abanico Brisa Mar Formation
The Abanico Brisa Mar Formation is a geologic formation in Mexico. It preserves fossils dating back to the Neogene period. See also[edit]Earth sciences portal Mexico portal Paleontology portal Neogene portal Cenozoic portalList of fossiliferous stratigraphic units in MexicoReferences[edit]External links[edit]Various Contributors to the Paleobiology Database. "Fossilworks: Gateway to the Paleobiology Database". Retrieved 8 July 2014. This article about a specific stratigraphic formation in Mexico is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article related to the Neogene period is a stub
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Chiloé Block
Central Andean PatagonianBatholithsPeruvian Coastal North Patagonian South PatagonianSubducted structures Antarctic Plate
Antarctic Plate
Carnegie Ridge
Carnegie Ridge

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Reynaldo Charrier
Reynaldo Charrier (b. 1945) is a Chilean geologist who has contributed to the tectonostratigraphy of Chile
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Geochronology
Geochronology
Geochronology
is the science of determining the age of rocks, fossils, and sediments using signatures inherent in the rocks themselves. Absolute geochronology can be accomplished through radioactive isotopes, whereas relative geochronology is provided by tools such as palaeomagnetism and stable isotope ratios. By combining multiple geochronological (and biostratigraphic) indicators the precision of the recovered age can be improved. Geochronology
Geochronology
is different in application from biostratigraphy, which is the science of assigning sedimentary rocks to a known geological period via describing, cataloguing and comparing fossil floral and faunal assemblages. Biostratigraphy
Biostratigraphy
does not directly provide an absolute age determination of a rock, but merely places it within an interval of time at which that fossil assemblage is known to have coexisted
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Arequipa-Antofalla
Arequipa-Antofalla
Arequipa-Antofalla
is a basement unit underlying the central Andes
Andes
in northwestern Argentina, western Bolivia, northern Chile and southern Peru. Geologically it corresponds to a craton,[1] terrane[2] or block[2][3] of continental crust. Arequipa-Antofalla
Arequipa-Antofalla
collided and amalgamated with the Amazonian craton about 1000 Ma ago during the Sunsás orogeny.[3] As a terrane Arequipa-Antofalla
Arequipa-Antofalla
was ribbon-shaped during the Paleozoic, a time when it was bounded by the west by the Iapetus Ocean
Iapetus Ocean
and by the east by the Puncoviscana Ocean.[2] References[edit]^ Casquet, C.; Pankhurst, R.J.; Rapela, C.W.; Galindo, C.; Fanning, C.M.; Chiaradia, M.; Baldo, E.; González-Casado, J.M.; Dahlquist, J.A. (2008)
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Chilenia
Central Andean PatagonianBatholithsPeruvian Coastal North Patagonian South PatagonianSubducted structures Antarctic Plate
Antarctic Plate
Carnegie Ridge
Carnegie Ridge

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Cuyania
Central Andean PatagonianBatholithsPeruvian Coastal North Patagonian South PatagonianSubducted structures Antarctic Plate
Antarctic Plate
Carnegie Ridge
Carnegie Ridge

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Andean Geology
Andean Geology
Geology
(formerly Revista Geológica de Chile) is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published three times per year by the National Geology
Geology
and Mining Service, Chile's geology and mining agency. The journal covers the field of geology and related earth sciences, primarily on issues that are relevant to South America, Central America, and Antarctica
Antarctica
with a particular focus on the Andes.[1] The journal was established in 1974 and articles are published in English and Spanish. The editor-in-chief is Waldo Vivallo (National Geology
Geology
and Mining Service). References[edit]^ "Instrucciones a Los Autores". Andean Geology. SERNAGEOMIN. Archived from the original on 26 April 2012. Retrieved 9 November 2011. External links[edit]Official websiteThis geology article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis Chile-related article is a stub
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Lacui Formation
Lacui Formation
Lacui Formation
(Spanish: Formación Lacui) is a marine Miocene sedimentary formation located in Chiloé Island
Chiloé Island
with minor outcrops near Carelmapu
Carelmapu
on the mainland.[1][2] Gastropod shells are the most common macrofossils of Lacui Formation.[2] According to Sernageomin (1998) the formation dates to the earliest Serravallian — that is the Middle Miocene.[2] See also[edit]Lacuy Peninsula Navidad Formation Santo Domingo FormationReferences[edit]^ Charrier, R.; Pinto, L.; Rodríguez, M.P. (2007). "Tectonostratigraphic evolution of the Andean Orogen in Chile". In Moreno, Teresa; Gibbons, Wes. The Geology of Chile. Geological Society of London. pp. 92–96.  ^ a b c Finger, Kenneth L
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Mejillones Peninsula
Mejillones
Mejillones
Peninsula (Spanish: península de Mejillones) protudes from the coast of northern Chile north of Antofagasta
Antofagasta
and south of the port of Mejillones. The basement rocks of the peninsula are made of metamorphic and igneous rocks that formed in the Late Triassic plus plutons formed in the Early Jurassic.[1] The eastern part of the peninsula hosts various normal faults.[2] Extensional tectonics
Extensional tectonics
in the peninsula begun no later than in the Early Miocene
Miocene
and has resulted in the formation of two half graben basins
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Tectonic Evolution Of Patagonia
Patagonia
Patagonia
comprises the southernmost region of South America, portions of which lie either side of the Chile–Argentina border
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Cenozoic
The Cenozoic
Cenozoic
Era ( /ˌsiːnəˈzoʊɪk, ˌsɛ-/)[1][2] is the current geological era, covering the period from 66 million years ago to the present day. The Cenozoic
Cenozoic
is also known as the Age of Mammals, because of the large mammals that dominate it. The continents also moved into their current positions during this era.Contents1 Nomenclature 2 Divisions2.1 Paleogene Period 2.2 Neogene 2.3 Quaternary3 Animal life 4 Tectonics 5 Climate 6 Life 7 See also 8 References 9 Bibliography 10 External linksNomenclature[edit] Cenozoic, meaning "new life," is derived from Greek καινός kainós "new," and ζωή zōḗ "life."[3] The era is also known as the Cænozoic, Caenozoic, or Cainozoic
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Neogene
The Neogene
Neogene
( /ˈniːəˌdʒiːn/)[6][7] (informally Upper Tertiary or Late Tertiary) is a geologic period and system that spans 20.45 million years from the end of the Paleogene Period 23.03 million years ago (Mya) to the beginning of the present Quaternary Period 2.58 Mya. The Neogene
Neogene
is sub-divided into two epochs, the earlier Miocene
Miocene
and the later Pliocene. Some geologists assert that the Neogene
Neogene
cannot be clearly delineated from the modern geological period, the Quaternary. The term "Neogene" was coined in 1853 by the Austrian palaeontologist Moritz Hörnes (1815–1868).[8] During this period, mammals and birds continued to evolve into roughly modern forms, while other groups of life remained relatively unchanged
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