HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Aaron Williams (composer)
Aaron Williams (1731–1776) was a Welsh teacher, composer, and compiler of West Gallery music, active in England during the 18th century.Contents1 Life 2 Publications 3 Influence on early American sacred music3.1 Harmonic idiom 3.2 St
[...More...]

"Aaron Williams (composer)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Caldicot, Monmouthshire
Caldicot (Welsh: Cil-y-coed) is a town and community in Monmouthshire, southeast Wales, located between Chepstow
Chepstow
and Newport on the Gloucester to Newport Line
Gloucester to Newport Line
served primarily by Caldicot station, whilst by road it is just off the busy M4 / M48 motorway
M48 motorway
corridor. The site adjoins the Caldicot Levels, on the north side of the Severn Estuary. Caldicot has easy access on the railway west to Newport, Cardiff
Cardiff
Central and east to Chepstow, Lydney, and Gloucester, as well as one stop west to Severn Tunnel
Severn Tunnel
Junction and then east via the Severn Tunnel
Severn Tunnel
to Filton Abbeywood and Bristol
Bristol
Temple Meads and further afield
[...More...]

"Caldicot, Monmouthshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Presbyterian
Presbyterianism
Presbyterianism
is a part of the Reformed tradition
Reformed tradition
within Protestantism
Protestantism
which traces its origins to the British Isles, particularly Scotland. Presbyterian churches derive their name from the presbyterian form of church government, which is governed by representative assemblies of elders. A great number of Reformed churches
Reformed churches
are organized this way, but the word Presbyterian, when capitalized, is often applied uniquely to churches that trace their roots to the Scottish and English Presbyterians, as well as several English dissenter groups that formed during the English Civil War.[2] Presbyterian theology typically emphasizes the sovereignty of God, the authority of the Scriptures, and the necessity of grace through faith in Christ
[...More...]

"Presbyterian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Newburyport, Massachusetts
Newburyport is a small coastal, scenic, and historic city in Essex County, Massachusetts, United States, 35 miles (56 km) northeast of Boston. The population was 17,416 at the 2010 census.[4] A historic seaport with a vibrant tourism industry, Newburyport includes part of Plum Island. The mooring, winter storage and maintenance of recreational boats, motor and sail, still contribute a large part of the city's income. A Coast Guard station oversees boating activity, especially in the swift tidal currents of the Merrimack River. At the edge of the Newbury Marshes, delineating Newburyport to the south, an industrial park provides a wide range of jobs. Newburyport is on a major north-south highway, Interstate 95. The outer circumferential highway of Boston, Interstate 495, passes nearby in Amesbury. The Newburyport Turnpike (U.S. Route 1) still traverses Newburyport on its way north
[...More...]

"Newburyport, Massachusetts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Anthem
An anthem is a musical composition of celebration, usually used as a symbol for a distinct group, particularly the national anthems of countries. Originally, and in music theory and religious contexts, it also refers more particularly to short sacred choral work (still frequently seen in Sacred Harp
Sacred Harp
and other types of shape note singing) and still more particularly to a specific form of Anglican church music.Etymology[edit] Anthem
Anthem
is derived from the Greek ἀντίφωνα (antíphōna) via Old English
Old English
antefn. Both words originally referred to antiphons, a call-and-response style of singing.[1] The adjectival form is "anthemic". History[edit] Anthems were originally a form of liturgical music. In the Church of England, the rubric appoints them to follow the third collect at morning and evening prayer
[...More...]

"Anthem" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fuguing Tune
The fuguing tune (often fuging tune) is a variety of Anglo-American vernacular choral music. It first flourished in the mid-18th century and continues to be composed today.Contents1 Description 2 Variety in fuguing tunes 3 History 4 Fuguing tunes and fugues 5 See also 6 Notes 7 Books 8 External linksDescription[edit] Fuguing tunes are sacred music, specifically, Protestant
Protestant
hymns. They are written for a four-part chorus singing a cappella. George Pullen Jackson has described the fuguing tune as follows:In the fuging tune all the parts start together and proceed in rhythmic and harmonic unity usually for the space of four measures or one musical sentence. The end of this sentence marks a cessation, a complete melodic close. During the next four measures the four parts set in, one at a time and one measure apart
[...More...]

"Fuguing Tune" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

William Billings
William Billings
William Billings
(October 7, 1746 – September 26, 1800) is regarded as the first American choral composer.[1]Contents1 Life 2 Music 3 Billings as a writer3.1 Verse 3.2 Pedagogical writing4 Singing schools 5 Reception 6 Other 7 See also 8 References8.1 Scholarly edition of Billings's works 8.2 Other9 External linksLife[edit] William Billings
William Billings
was born in Boston, Massachusetts. At the age of 14, the death of his father stopped Billings' formal schooling. In order to help support his family, young Billings trained as a tanner
[...More...]

"William Billings" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Shape Note
Shape notes are a music notation designed to facilitate congregational and community singing. The notation, introduced in 1801, became a popular teaching device in American singing schools. Shapes were added to the note heads in written music to help singers find pitches within major and minor scales without the use of more complex information found in key signatures on the staff. Shape notes of various kinds have been used for over two centuries in a variety of music traditions, mostly sacred but also secular, originating in New England, practiced primarily in the Southern region of the United States for many years, and now experiencing a renaissance in other locations as well.Contents1 Shape notes 2 Four-shape vs
[...More...]

"Shape Note" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

The Virginia Harmony
The Virginia Harmony is a shape note tune book published in 1831 in Winchester, Virginia and compiled by Methodist lay preacher James P. Carrell (1787–1854) and Presbyterian elder David S. Clayton (1801–1854). It is one of the earliest known print sources of the tune for "Amazing Grace", given in The Virginia Harmony as "Harmony Grove" and used as a setting for the Isaac Watts hymn "There Is a Land of Pure Delight".[1] The "Amazing Grace" text was not set to this melody until the 1847 Southern Harmony, where the tune was called "New Britain". Sources[edit]^ Turner, Steve; Collins, Judy (2003). Amazing Grace: The Story of America's Most Beloved Song. p. 118. ISBN 978-0-06-000219-0. This article about a music publication is a stub
[...More...]

"The Virginia Harmony" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Lowell Mason
Lowell Mason
Lowell Mason
(January 8, 1792 – August 11, 1872) was a leading figure in American church music, the composer of over 1600 hymn tunes, many of which are often sung today. His most well-known tunes include his arrangement of "Joy to the World" and the tune, "Bethany", which is his setting of the hymn text, "Nearer, My God, to Thee". He was largely responsible for introducing music into American public schools, and is considered to be the first important music educator in the United States
[...More...]

"Lowell Mason" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Timothy Swan
Timothy Swan
Timothy Swan
(1758–1842)[1] was a composer and hatmaker born in Worcester, Massachusetts. The son of goldsmith William Swan,[2] Swan lived in small towns along the Connecticut River in Connecticut and Massachusetts for most of his life. Swan's compositional output consisted mostly of psalm and hymn settings, referred to as psalmody. These tunes and settings were produced for choirs and singing schools located in Congregationalist communities of New England. Swan is unique as an early American composer in that he composed secular vocal duets and songs in addition to sacred tunebook music
[...More...]

"Timothy Swan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

West Gallery Music
West gallery music, also known as "Georgian psalmody", refers to the sacred music (metrical psalms, with a few hymns and anthems) sung and played in English parish churches, as well as nonconformist chapels, from 1700 to around 1850. In the late 1980s, west gallery music experienced a revival and is now sung by several west gallery "quires" (choirs).West gallery in St. Mary's church, Ardley, OxfordshireThe term derives from the wooden galleries which were constructed at the west end of churches during the 18th century upon which the choir would perform (churches were typically built in a certain layout with the nave running from east-west away from the altar). Victorians disapproved of these Georgian galleries, and most were removed during restorations in the 19th century.[1] The music sung by gallery choirs often consisted of metrical psalm settings by composers with little formal training, often themselves local teachers or choir members
[...More...]

"West Gallery Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

First New England School
American classical music is music written in the United States
United States
in the European classical music
European classical music
tradition. In many cases, beginning in the 18th century, it has been influenced by American folk music styles; and from the 20th century to the present day it has often been influenced by folk, jazz, blues, Native American, and pop styles.Contents1 Beginnings 2 Second New England
New England
School 3 20th century 4 ReferencesBeginnings[edit] The earliest American classical music consists of part-songs used in religious services during Colonial times
[...More...]

"First New England School" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

William Tans'ur
William Tans'ur (or Tansur, Tanzer, Letansur) (6 November 1706, Dunchurch
Dunchurch
– 7 October 1783, St. Neots)[1] was an English hymn-writer, composer of West gallery music, and teacher of music. His output includes approximately a hundred hymn tunes and psalm settings and a Te Deum. His manual A New Musical Grammar (1746) was still popular in the nineteenth century.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Influence on early American sacred music 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Tans'ur was born in Dunchurch, Warwickshire
Warwickshire
to Edward Tanzer, a labourer, and Joan Alibone. In 1730 he married Elizabeth Butler and moved to Ewell, near Epsom. They had at least two sons
[...More...]

"William Tans'ur" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

The Sacred Harp
Sacred Harp singing is a tradition of sacred choral music that originated in New England and was later perpetuated and carried on in the American South of the United States. The name is derived from The Sacred Harp, a ubiquitous and historically important tunebook printed in shape notes. The work was first published in 1844 and has reappeared in multiple editions ever since. Sacred Harp music represents one branch of an older tradition of American music that developed over the period 1770 to 1820 from roots in New England, with a significant, related development under the influence of "revival" services around the 1840s
[...More...]

"The Sacred Harp" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.