HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

A Sand County Almanac
A Sand County Almanac: And Sketches Here and There is a 1949 non-fiction book by American ecologist, forester, and environmentalist Aldo Leopold. Describing the land around the author's home in Sauk County, Wisconsin, the collection of essays advocate Leopold's idea of a "land ethic", or a responsible relationship existing between people and the land they inhabit
[...More...]

"A Sand County Almanac" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Trophic Cascade
Trophic cascades are powerful indirect interactions that can control entire ecosystems, occurring when predators in a food web suppress the abundance or alter the behavior of their prey, thereby releasing the next lower trophic level from predation (or herbivory if the intermediate trophic level is a herbivore). For example, if the abundance of large piscivorous fish is increased in a lake, the abundance of their prey, smaller fish that eat zooplankton, should decrease. The resulting increase in zooplankton should, in turn, cause the biomass of its prey, phytoplankton, to decrease. The trophic cascade is an ecological concept which has stimulated new research in many areas of ecology
[...More...]

"Trophic Cascade" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Flora
Flora
Flora
is the plant life occurring in a particular region or time, generally the naturally occurring or indigenous—native plant life. The corresponding term for animal life is fauna. Flora, fauna and other forms of life such as fungi are collectively referred to as biota. Sometimes bacteria and fungi are also referred to as flora, as in the terms gut flora or skin flora.[1][2][3]Contents1 Etymology 2 Flora
Flora
classifications 3 Documentation of floras 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The word "flora" comes from the Latin
Latin
name of Flora, the goddess of plants, flowers, and fertility in Roman mythology.[4][citation needed] The distinction between vegetation (the general appearance of a community) and flora (the taxonomic composition of a community) was first made by Jules Thurmann
Jules Thurmann
(1849)
[...More...]

"Flora" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dartmouth College
Dartmouth College
Dartmouth College
(/ˈdɑːrtməθ/ DART-məth) is a private Ivy League research university in Hanover, New Hampshire, United States. Established in 1769 by Eleazar Wheelock, it is the ninth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution.[6] Although founded as a school to educate Native Americans in Christian theology and the English way of life, Dartmouth primarily trained Congregationalist ministers throughout its early history before it gradually secularized, emerging at the turn of the 20th century from
[...More...]

"Dartmouth College" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Donella Meadows
Donella H. "Dana" Meadows[1] (March 13, 1941 – February 20, 2001) was a pioneering American environmental scientist, teacher, and writer. She is best known as lead author of the influential book The Limits to Growth and Thinking in Systems: a Primer.[2]Contents1 Life 2 Work2.1 The Limits to Growth 2.2 The Balaton Group 2.3 Sustainability Institute and Related Organizations 2.4 State of the Village report 2.5 Twelve leverage points3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksLife[edit] Born in Elgin, Illinois, Meadows was educated in science, receiving a B.A. in chemistry from Carleton College
Carleton College
in 1963 and a Ph.D. in biophysics from Harvard in 1968. After a yearlong trip from England to Sri Lanka and back, she became a research fellow at MIT, as a member of a team in the department created by Jay Forrester, the inventor of system dynamics as well as the principle of magnetic data storage for computers
[...More...]

"Donella Meadows" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Conservation In The United States
Conservation in the United States
Conservation in the United States
can be traced back to the 19th century with the formation of the first National Park. Conservation generally refers to the act of consciously and efficiently using land and/or its natural resources. This can be in the form of setting aside tracts of land for protection from hunting or urban development, or it can take the form of using less resources such as metal, water, or coal. Usually, this process of conservation occurs through or after legislation on local or national levels is passed. Conservation in the United States, as a movement, began with the American sportsmen who came to the realization that wanton waste of wildlife and their habitat had led to the extinction of some species, while other species were at risk
[...More...]

"Conservation In The United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Conservation Policy
The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is a United States environmental law that promotes the enhancement of the environment and established the President's Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ). The law was enacted on January 1, 1970.[2] To date, more than 100 nations around the world have enacted national environmental policies modeled after NEPA. [3] NEPA's most significant outcome was the requirement that all executive federal agencies prepare environmental assessments (EAs) and environmental impact statements (EISs)
[...More...]

"Conservation Policy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Environmentalism In America
Conservation in the United States can be traced back to the 19th century with the formation of the first National Park. Conservation generally refers to the act of consciously and efficiently using land and/or its natural resources. This can be in the form of setting aside tracts of land for protection from hunting or urban development, or it can take the form of using less resources such as metal, water, or coal. Usually, this process of conservation occurs through or after legislation on local or national levels is passed. Conservation in the United States, as a movement, began with the American sportsmen who came to the realization that wanton waste of wildlife and their habitat had led to the extinction of some species, while other species were at risk
[...More...]

"Environmentalism In America" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Walden
Walden
Walden
(/ˈwɔːldən/; first published as Walden; or, Life in the Woods) is a book by noted transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau. The text is a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings.[2] The work is part personal declaration of independence, social experiment, voyage of spiritual discovery, satire, and—to some degree—a manual for self-reliance.[3] First published in 1854, Walden
Walden
details Thoreau's experiences over the course of two years, two months, and two days in a cabin he built near Walden
Walden
Pond, amidst woodland owned by his friend and mentor Ralph Waldo Emerson, near Concord, Massachusetts. Thoreau used this time to write his first book, A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers
[...More...]

"Walden" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Silent Spring
Silent Spring
Silent Spring
is an environmental science book by Rachel Carson.[1] The book was published on 27 September 1962 and it documented the adverse effects on the environment of the indiscriminate use of pesticides. Carson accused the chemical industry of spreading disinformation and public officials of accepting industry claims unquestioningly. In the late 1950s, Carson turned her attention to conservation, especially environmental problems that she believed were caused by synthetic pesticides. The result was Silent Spring
Silent Spring
(1962), which brought environmental concerns to the American public. Silent Spring was met with fierce opposition by chemical companies, but it spurred a reversal in national pesticide policy, led to a nationwide ban on DDT for agricultural uses,[2] and inspired an environmental movement that led to the creation of the U.S
[...More...]

"Silent Spring" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rachel Carson
Rachel Louise Carson (May 27, 1907 – April 14, 1964) was an American marine biologist, author, and conservationist whose book Silent Spring
Silent Spring
and other writings are credited with advancing the global environmental movement. Carson began her career as an aquatic biologist in the U.S. Bureau of Fisheries, and became a full-time nature writer in the 1950s. Her widely praised 1951 bestseller The Sea Around Us
The Sea Around Us
won her a U.S. National Book Award,[2] recognition as a gifted writer, and financial security. Her next book, The Edge of the Sea, and the reissued version of her first book, Under the Sea Wind, were also bestsellers. This sea trilogy explores the whole of ocean life from the shores to the depths. Late in the 1950s, Carson turned her attention to conservation, especially some problems that she believed were caused by synthetic pesticides
[...More...]

"Rachel Carson" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Commodity
In economics, a commodity is an economic good or service that has full or substantial fungibility: that is, the market treats instances of the good as equivalent or nearly so with no regard to who produced them.[1] The price of a commodity good is typically determined as a function of its market as a whole: well-established physical commodities have actively traded spot and derivative markets
[...More...]

"Commodity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Kathleen Dean Moore
Kathleen Dean Moore (b. 1947, Berea, Ohio) is a philosopher, writer, and environmental activist from Oregon State University. Her early creative nonfiction writing focused on the cultural and spiritual values of the natural world, especially shorelines and islands. Her more recent work is about the moral issues of climate change.Contents1 Life 2 Awards 3 Works3.1 Nonfiction and Creative Nonfiction 3.2 Anthologies 3.3 Edited volume 3.4 Textbooks 3.5 Fiction4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Moore was raised in Berea, Ohio, a suburb of Cleveland. In 1969, she graduated with a B.A. in philosophy and French from Wooster College in Wooster, Ohio. From the University of Colorado in Boulder, she earned her M.A. and Ph.D. in philosophy and studied in the Fleming School of Law. In 1992, she joined the faculty of the Department of Philosophy at Oregon State University, where she taught philosophy of law, critical thinking, and environmental philosophy
[...More...]

"Kathleen Dean Moore" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Charles W. Schwartz
Charles W. Schwartz (June 2, 1914 — July 4, 1991) was an American wildlife artist, biologist, author, conservationist, and filmmaker known for his work on Missouri wildlife.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 References 4 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Schwartz was born in St. Louis to parents Frederick O. Schwartz and Clara Walsh Schwartz.[1] He received his AB in Zoology from the University of Missouri in 1938.[2] A graduate assistantship during his MA led Schwartz to work with Elizabeth "Libby" Reeder, a Ph.D. candidate. They married in 1938 and later had three children, Barbara, Bruce, and John. In 1940, Schwartz completed his MA and began work at the Missouri Conservation Commission as a biologist.[1] Career[edit] Schwartz's career with the Missouri Department of Conservation lasted for thirty-nine years.[2] A short stint from 1946-1947 was spent in Hawaii studying wildlife conditions for Hawaii's Board of Agriculture and Forestry
[...More...]

"Charles W. Schwartz" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mexico
Coordinates: 23°N 102°W / 23°N 102°W / 23; -102United Mexican States Estados Unidos Mexicanos  (Spanish)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Himno Nacional Mexicano" (English: "Mexican National Anthem")Capital and largest city Mexico
Mexico
City 19°26′N 99°08′W / 19.433°N 99.133°W / 19.433; -99.133Official languagesNone at federal level[b] Spanish (de facto)Recognized regional languagesSpanish 68 native languages[1]National language Spanish[b]Religion83% Roman Catholicism 10% Other Christian 0.2% Othe
[...More...]

"Mexico" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fauna
Fauna
Fauna
is all of the animal life of any particular region or time. The corresponding term for plants is flora. Flora, fauna and other forms of life such as fungi are collectively referred to as biota. Zoologists and paleontologists use fauna to refer to a typical collection of animals found in a specific time or place, e.g. the " Sonoran Desert
Sonoran Desert
fauna" or the " Burgess Shale
Burgess Shale
fauna". Paleontologists sometimes refer to a sequence of faunal stages, which is a series of rocks all containing similar fossils
[...More...]

"Fauna" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.