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A Motley Vision
Contemporary Mormon literature multi-author weblogAvailable in EnglishCreated by William MorrisWebsite MotleyVision.orgLaunched June 2, 2004Current status Active A Motley Vision is an online multi-author blog featuring criticism of the Mormon arts, LDS literature and film in particular. It was launched by William Morris on June 2, 2004.[1] It won the Association for Mormon Letters award for criticism in 2005 for "Its writers have made serious efforts to give sustained discussion to important issues, rather than simply aggregating fragments and chatter
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Culture Of The Church Of Jesus Christ Of Latter-day Saints
The basic beliefs and traditions of The Church of Jesus Christ
Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) have a cultural impact that distinguishes church members, practices and activities. The culture is geographically concentrated in the Mormon Corridor
Mormon Corridor
in the United States, and is present to a lesser extent in many places of the world where Latter-day Saints live. In some aspects, Latter-day Saint culture is distinct from church doctrine. Cultural practices which are centrally based on church doctrine include adhering the church's law of health, paying tithing, living the law of chastity, participation in lay leadership of the church, refraining from work on Sundays when possible, family home evenings, and home and visiting teaching
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Weblog
A blog (a truncation of the expression "weblog")[1] is a discussion or informational website published on the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
consisting of discrete, often informal diary-style text entries ("posts"). Posts are typically displayed in reverse chronological order, so that the most recent post appears first, at the top of the web page. Until 2009, blogs were usually the work of a single individual,[citation needed] occasionally of a small group, and often covered a single subject or topic. In the 2010s, "multi-author blogs" (MABs) have developed, with posts written by large numbers of authors and sometimes professionally edited. MABs from newspapers, other media outlets, universities, think tanks, advocacy groups, and similar institutions account for an increasing quantity of blog traffic. The rise of Twitter
Twitter
and other "microblogging" systems helps integrate MABs and single-author blogs into the news media
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Latter Day Saint Movement
The Latter Day Saint
Saint
movement (also called the LDS movement, LDS restorationist movement, or Smith–Rigdon movement)[1] is the collection of independent church groups that trace their origins to a Christian primitivist movement founded by Joseph Smith
Joseph Smith
in the late 1820s. Collectively, these churches have over 16 million members.[2] The vast majority of adherents—about 98%—belong to The Church of Jesus
Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), with their predominant theology being Mormonism. The LDS Church
LDS Church
self-identifies as Christian.[3][4] A minority of Latter Day Saint
Saint
adherents, such as members of the Community of Christ, believe in traditional Protestant theology, and have distanced themselves from some of the distinctive doctrines of Mormonism
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Literary Criticism
Literary criticism
Literary criticism
(or literary studies) is the study, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. Modern literary criticism is often influenced by literary theory, which is the philosophical discussion of literature's goals and methods. Though the two activities are closely related, literary critics are not always, and have not always been, theorists. Whether or not literary criticism should be considered a separate field of inquiry from literary theory, or conversely from book reviewing, is a matter of some controversy. For example, the Johns Hopkins Guide to Literary Theory and Criticism[1] draws no distinction between literary theory and literary criticism, and almost always uses the terms together to describe the same concept
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Film Criticism
Film
Film
criticism is the analysis and evaluation of films and the film medium. The concept is often used interchangeably with that of the film reviews. A film review implies a recommendation aimed at consumers, however not all film criticism takes the form of reviews. In general, film criticism can be divided into two categories: journalistic criticism which appears regularly in newspapers, magazines and other popular mass-media outlets; and academic criticism by film scholars who are informed by film theory and are published in academic journals
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Twilight (novel)
Twilight
Twilight
(stylized as twilight) (2005) is a young adult vampire-romance novel[3][4] by author Stephenie Meyer. It is the first book in the Twilight
Twilight
series, and introduces seventeen-year-old Isabella "Bella" Swan, who moves from Phoenix, Arizona
Phoenix, Arizona
to Forks, Washington. She is endangered after falling in love with Edward Cullen, a vampire. Additional novels in the series are New Moon, Eclipse, and Breaking Dawn. Twilight
Twilight
received lukewarm reviews. Some praised the novel's tone and its portrayal of common teenage emotions such as alienation and rebellion. Others criticized Meyer's prose and argued the story was lacking in character development
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Stephenie Meyer
Stephenie Meyer
Stephenie Meyer
(née Morgan; /ˈmaɪ.ər/; born December 24, 1973) is an American young adult fiction writer and film producer, best known for her vampire romance series Twilight.[1][2][3] The Twilight
Twilight
novels have gained worldwide recognition and sold over 100 million copies,[1][4] with translations into 37 different languages.[2][3] Meyer was the bestselling author of 2008 and 2009 in America, having sold over 29 million books in 2008,[5][6] and 26.5 million books in 2009.[7] Twilight
Twilight
was the best-selling book of 2008 in US bookstores.[8] Meyer was ranked No. 49 on Time magazine's list of the "100 Most Influential People in 2008",[9] and was included in the Forbes Celebrity 100 list of the world's most powerful celebrities in 2009, entering at No. 26. Her annual earnings exceeded $50 million.[10] In 2010, Forbes
Forbes
ranked her as the No
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Coke Newell
Clayton Corey "Coke" Newell is a writer of fiction and nonfiction whose professional career outside of freelance is often defined by his decade-plus stint in public relations for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Newell grew up deep in the Colorado mountains south and west of Denver, inspired by his readings of Thoreau, Black Elk
Black Elk
and Kerouac. He converted to the LDS faith as a teenager and later served a mission to Colombia. Research for his first published book, Dying Words: Colombian Journalists and the Cocaine Warlords (1991), was funded by the Scripps Howard Foundation and the InterAmerican Press Association
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LDS Cinema
LDS or Mormon cinema (informally Mollywood, a portmanteau of Molly Mormon and Hollywood[1][2]) usually refers to films with themes relevant to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The terminology has also been used to refer to films that do not necessarily reflect Mormon themes but have been made by Mormon filmmakers. Many of these films are screened extensively within high LDS population centers such as Utah, Idaho, and Arizona
Arizona
and do not regularly reach mainstream viewers in other parts of the world. LDS cinema
LDS cinema
films might be considered distinct from LDS Church
LDS Church
movies like Legacy and Testaments, since they are commercial and not produced for teaching or proselytizing LDS doctrine. LDS cinema
LDS cinema
is usually produced and directed by Latter-day Saints
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Criticism
Criticism
Criticism
is the practice of judging the merits and faults of something.Crítica, engraving by Julio Ruelas, ca. 1907The judger is called a critic. To engage in criticism is to criticise (in British English – see American and British English spelling differences.) One specific item of criticism is called a criticism or critique. Criticism
Criticism
is an evaluative or corrective exercise that can occur in any area of human life. Criticism
Criticism
can therefore take many different forms (see below). How exactly people go about criticizing, can vary a great deal. In specific areas of human endeavour, the form of criticism can be highly specialized and technical; it often requires professional knowledge to understand the criticism. This article provides only general information about criticism
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Blog
A blog (a truncation of the expression "weblog")[1] is a discussion or informational website published on the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
consisting of discrete, often informal diary-style text entries ("posts"). Posts are typically displayed in reverse chronological order, so that the most recent post appears first, at the top of the web page. Until 2009, blogs were usually the work of a single individual,[citation needed] occasionally of a small group, and often covered a single subject or topic. In the 2010s, "multi-author blogs" (MABs) have developed, with posts written by large numbers of authors and sometimes professionally edited. MABs from newspapers, other media outlets, universities, think tanks, advocacy groups, and similar institutions account for an increasing quantity of blog traffic. The rise of Twitter
Twitter
and other "microblogging" systems helps integrate MABs and single-author blogs into the news media
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Collaborative Blog
A blog (a truncation of the expression "weblog")[1] is a discussion or informational website published on the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
consisting of discrete, often informal diary-style text entries ("posts"). Posts are typically displayed in reverse chronological order, so that the most recent post appears first, at the top of the web page. Until 2009, blogs were usually the work of a single individual,[citation needed] occasionally of a small group, and often covered a single subject or topic. In the 2010s, "multi-author blogs" (MABs) have developed, with posts written by large numbers of authors and sometimes professionally edited. MABs from newspapers, other media outlets, universities, think tanks, advocacy groups, and similar institutions account for an increasing quantity of blog traffic. The rise of Twitter
Twitter
and other "microblogging" systems helps integrate MABs and single-author blogs into the news media
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Mormon Literature
Mormon literature
Mormon literature
is generally considered to have begun a few years before the March 1830 publication of the Book of Mormon. Since then, Mormon literature
Mormon literature
has grown to include more scripture, as well as histories, fiction, biographies, poetry, hymns, drama and other forms. See also[edit]A Believing People Association for Mormon LettersAML AwardsBloggernacle Richard H. Cracroft Eugene England LDS cinema LDS fiction LDS poetry List of films of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints List of pageants of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints List of Mormon Cartoonists Mormon art Mormon folk music Mormon music A Motley Vision Whitney AwardsReferences[edit]England, Eugene. "Mormon Literature: Progress and Prospects" in David J. Whittaker, ed., Mormon Americana: A Guide to Sources and Collections in the United States
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LDS Poetry
LDS poetry (or Mormon poetry) is poetry written by members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints about spiritual topics or themes. Latter-day Saints have composed religious poetry since the Church's beginnings in the early 18th century. For Latter-day Saints, poetry is a form of art that can bring the Holy Spirit
Holy Spirit
to the presented message. For example, the Elder's Journal, published at Far West in 1838 and edited by Joseph and Don Carlos Smith, contained a beautiful poetic tribute to James G. Marsh.[1] Poetry
Poetry
was often used in hymns in the foundation period of LDS Literature (1830–1880). Notable poetry includes the works of Eliza R. Snow, Parley P. Pratt, and W. W. Phelps, along with the published volume of poetry by John Lyon, The Harp of Zion: A Collection of Poems, Etc. (1853).[2] During the "home literature" period (1880–1930), a number of poets published or disseminated their works
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