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A Divine Image
A Divine Image
A Divine Image
is a poem by William Blake
William Blake
from Songs of Experience, not to be confused with "The Divine Image" from Songs of Innocence. The poem only appeared in copy BB of the combined Songs of Innocence and of Experience. [1] Ralph Vaughan Williams
Ralph Vaughan Williams
set the poem to music in his 1958 song cycle Ten Blake
Blake
Songs, under the title "Cruelty Has a Human Heart". Full Text[edit] A Divine ImageCruelty has a human heart, And Jealousy a human face; Terror the human form divine, And Secrecy the human dress.The human dress is forged iron, The human form a fiery forge, The human face a furnace seal'd, The human heart its hungry gorge. References[edit]^ "Songs of Innocence and of Experience"
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On Another's Sorrow
On Another's Sorrow
On Another's Sorrow
is a poem by the English poet William Blake. The poem discusses human and divine empathy and compassion. It was published as part of the Songs of Innocence and of Experience
Songs of Innocence and of Experience
in 1789 as the last song in the Songs of Innocence section. Blake argues that human sympathy is a valuable trait. After making this observation about man he then speaks of the sympathy of God, as well. In his commentary on the poem, D. G. Gillham notes that though Blake discusses the nature of God, he attempts to do so in a rational way without referring to the supernatural.[1] The poem is one of the few entries in Songs of Innocence and of Experience that contains an explicit declaration of innocence.[1] It is also the only poem in the volume that is in Blake's own voice.[2] References[edit]^ a b Gillham 1973, p. 71 ^ Gardner 1998, p
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Ralph Vaughan Williams
Ralph Vaughan Williams
Ralph Vaughan Williams
OM (/reɪf vɔːn/ ( listen);[n 1] 12 October 1872 – 26 August 1958) was an English composer. His works include operas, ballets, chamber music, secular and religious vocal pieces and orchestral compositions including nine symphonies, written over nearly fifty years. Strongly influenced by Tudor music and English folk-song, his output marked a decisive break in British music from its German-dominated style of the 19th century. Vaughan Williams was born to a well-to-do family with strong moral views and a progressive social outlook. Throughout his life he sought to be of service to his fellow citizens, and believed in making music as available as possible to everybody. He wrote many works for amateur and student performance
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Song Cycle
A song cycle (German: Liederkreis or Liederzyklus) is a group, or cycle, of individually complete songs designed to be performed in a sequence as a unit.[1] The songs are either for solo voice or an ensemble, or rarely a combination of solo songs mingled with choral pieces.[2] The number of songs in a song cycle may be as brief as two songs[3] or as long as 30 or more songs.[1] The term "song cycle" did not enter lexicography until 1865, in Arrey von Dommer's edition of Koch’s Musikalisches Lexikon, but works definable in retrospect as song cycles existed long before then.[1] One of the earliest examples may be the set of seven Cantigas de amigo by the 13th-century Galician jongleur Martin Codax.[4] A song cycle is similar to a song collection, and the two can be difficult to distinguish. Some type of coherence, however, is regarded as a necessary attribute of song cycles
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The Tyger
"The Tyger" is a poem by the English poet William Blake
William Blake
published in 1794 as part of the Songs of Experience
Songs of Experience
collection
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Introduction (Blake, 1794)
Introduction to the Songs of Experience
Songs of Experience
is a poem written by the English poet William Blake. It was etched and published as part of his collection Songs of Innocence and of Experience
Songs of Innocence and of Experience
in 1794.[1]Contents1 Context and interpretation 2 Musical settings 3 Notes3.1 Works cited4 Gallery 5 External linksContext and interpretation[edit] The poem is etched on a single plate and placed immediately after the title-page of the Songs of Experience. The text has not been found in any draft or manuscript version. Its subject is closely connected with the poem The Voice of the Ancient Bard
The Voice of the Ancient Bard
in the Songs of Innocence
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Earth's Answer
Earth's Answer
Earth's Answer
is a poem by William Blake
William Blake
within his larger collection called Songs of Innocence and of Experience
Songs of Innocence and of Experience
(published 1794).[2] It is the response to the previous poem in The Songs of Experience-- Introduction (Blake, 1794). In the Introduction, the bard asks the Earth to wake up and claim ownership
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The Clod And The Pebble
The Clod and the Pebble
The Clod and the Pebble
is a poem from William Blake's 1794 collection Songs of Innocence and of Experience.Contents1 The poem 2 Summary 3 Themes3.1 Love 3.2 Innocence 3.3 Experience4 Literary Influence 5 References 6 External linksThe poem[edit] Wikisource
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Holy Thursday (Songs Of Experience)
"Holy Thursday" is a poem by William Blake, first published in Songs of Innocence and Experience in 1794. This poem, unlike its companion poem in "Songs of Innocence" (1789), focuses more on society as a whole than on the ceremony held in London. Analysis[edit] The primary objective of this poem is to question social and moral injustice
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The Little Girl Lost
The Little Girl Lost
The Little Girl Lost
is a 1794 poem published by William Blake
William Blake
in his collection Songs of Innocence and of Experience. According to scholar, Grevel Lindop, this poem represents Blake's pattern of the transition between "the spontaneous, imaginative Innocence of childhood" to the "complex and mature (but also more dangerous) adult state of Experience."[1]Contents1 Summary and Structure 2 Poem 3 Plate 4 Themes and Analysis 5 References 6 Works Cited 7 External linksSummary and Structure[edit] According to Lindop, the poem starts out with a prophecy from Blake during the first two stanzas. This prophecy is telling readers that "our imperfect world will one day be redeemed and renewed by the God who created it." [1] This is not a warning of a "second-coming" or "judgement day," but just Blake
Blake
believing that those on earth must seek out God
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The Little Girl Found
The Little Girl Found
The Little Girl Found
is a poem written by the English poet William Blake. It was published as part of his collection Songs of Experience in 1794. In the poem, the parents of a seven-year-old girl, called Lyca, are looking desperately for their young daughter who is lost in the desert
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The Sick Rose
"The Sick Rose" is a poem by William Blake. The first publication was in 1794, when it was included in his collection titled Songs of Experience as the 39th plate. The incipit of the poem is O Rose thou art sick. Blake
Blake
composed the page sometime after 1789, and presents it with the illuminated border and illustrations that were typical of his self publications. Most aspects of the original production were undertaken by the author, the composition of the poem and design, engraving, and promotion of the work. The printing was usually done by Blake's wife, Catherine, as well as any colouring not performed by Blake
Blake
himself.[1]Contents1 Text 2 Analysis 3 References 4 External linksText[edit] The text has been republished in typeset many times, with slight variations, and is usually included in collections of the author's work
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The Fly (poem)
"The Fly" is a poem written by the English poet William Blake. It was published as part of his collection Songs of Experience
Songs of Experience
in 1794.[1] It was set to music in 1965 by Benjamin Britten
Benjamin Britten
as part of his song cycle Songs and Proverbs of William Blake
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William Blake
William Blake
Blake
(28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827) was an English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake
Blake
is now considered a seminal figure in the history of the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age
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My Pretty Rose Tree
My Pretty Rose Tree
My Pretty Rose Tree
is a poem written by the English poet William Blake. It was published as part of his collection Songs of Experience in 1794.Contents1 The Poem 2 Summary 3 Threefold Vision of Love 4 Themes and Interpretations4.1 Possessiveness5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksThe Poem[edit] A flower was offered to me, Such a flower as May never bore; But I said, ‘I’ve a pretty rose tree,’ And I passed the sweet flower o’er.Then I went to my pretty rose tree, To tend her by day and by night; But my rose turned away with jealousy, And her thorns were my only delight. Summary[edit] A man is offered a flower far surpassing the beauty of an ordinary flower, but he turns it down because he already has a pretty rose tree
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