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AYR
Ayr
Ayr
(/ɛər/; Scottish Gaelic: Inbhir Àir, "Mouth of the River Ayr") is a large town and former Royal Burgh
Royal Burgh
on the west coast of Ayrshire in Scotland. It is the administrative centre of the South Ayrshire Council area and historic county town of Ayrshire. Ayr
Ayr
is currently the most populated settlement in Ayrshire
Ayrshire
and is the 12th most populous settlement in Scotland
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Julian Calendar
The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
in 46 BC (708 AUC), was a reform of the Roman calendar.[1] It took effect on 1 January
January
45 BC (AUC 709), by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII. The Julian calendar
Julian calendar
gains against the mean tropical year at the rate of one day in 128 years. For the Gregorian calendar, the figure is one day in 3,030 years.[2] The difference in the average length of the year between Julian (365.25 days) and Gregorian (365.2425 days) is 0.002%. The Julian calendar
Julian calendar
has a regular year of 365 days divided into 12 months, as listed in the table below. A leap day is added to February every four years
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Telephone Numbers In The United Kingdom
Telephone numbers in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
are administered by the UK government's Office of Communications (Ofcom)
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List Of United Kingdom Locations
A gazetteer of place names in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
showing each place's county, unitary authority or council area and its geographical coordinates.A B C D E F G H I, J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X–ZSee also External linksThe United KingdomLocation names beginning with ALocation names beginning with Aa–Ak Location names beginning with Al Location names beginning with Am–Ar Location names beginning with As–AzLocation names beginning with BLocation names beginning with Bab–Bal Location names beginning with Bam
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Medieval Period
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
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Early Modern Period
The early modern period of modern history follows the late Middle Ages of the post-classical era. Although the chronological limits of the period are open to debate, the timeframe spans the period after the late portion of the post-classical age (c. 1500), known as the Middle Ages, through the beginning of the Age of Revolutions (c
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Scottish Parliament
Government (62)[1]     Scottish National Party
Scottish National Party
(62)Opposition (66)[1]     Conservative (31)      Labour (22)      Green (6)      Liberal Democrats (5)      Independents (2)Presiding Officer (1)     PO (1)Committees16Audit Equal Opportunities Europe and External Relations Finance Procedures Public Petitions Standards and Public Ap
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Citadel
A citadel is the core fortified area of a town or city. It may be a fortress, castle, or fortified center. The term is a diminutive of "city" and thus means "little city", so called because it is a smaller part of the city of which it is the defensive core. Ancient Sparta
Ancient Sparta
had a citadel as did many other Greek cities and towns. In a fortification with bastions, the citadel is the strongest part of the system, sometimes well inside the outer walls and bastions, but often forming part of the outer wall for the sake of economy. It is positioned to be the last line of defense, should the enemy breach the other components of the fortification system. A citadel is also a term of the third part of a medieval castle, with higher walls than the rest
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Oliver Cromwell
English Civil War:Gainsborough Marston Moor Newbury II Naseby Langport Preston Dunbar WorcesterRoyal styles of Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector
Lord Protector
of the CommonwealthReference style His HighnessSpoken style Your HighnessAlternative style Sir Oliver Cromwell
Oliver Cromwell
(25 April 1599 – 3 September 1658)[a] was an English military and political leader. He served as Lord Protector
Lord Protector
of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 1653 until his death, acting simultaneously as head of state and head of government of the new republic. Cromwell was born into the middle gentry, albeit to a family descended from the sister of King Henry VIII's minister Thomas Cromwell
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Ayr, Carrick And Cumnock (UK Parliament Constituency)
In modern politics and history, a parliament is a legislative, elected body of government. Generally, a modern parliament has three functions: representing the electorate, making laws, and overseeing the government via hearings and inquiries. The term is similar to the idea of a senate, synod or congress, and is commonly used in countries that are current or former monarchies, a form of government with a monarch as the head. Some contexts restrict the use of the word parliament to parliamentary systems, although it is also used to describe the legislature in some presidential systems (e.g. the French parliament), even where it is not in the official name. Historically, parliaments included various kinds of deliberative, consultative, and judicial assemblies, e.g
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Rail Transport
Rail transport
Rail transport
is a means of transferring of passengers and goods on wheeled vehicles running on rails, also known as tracks. It is also commonly referred to as train transport. In contrast to road transport, where vehicles run on a prepared flat surface, rail vehicles (rolling stock) are directionally guided by the tracks on which they run. Tracks usually consist of steel rails, installed on ties (sleepers) and ballast, on which the rolling stock, usually fitted with metal wheels, moves
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Scotland (European Parliament Constituency)
Scotland
Scotland
constitutes a single constituency of the European Parliament. In 2014 it elected six MEPs, using the d'Hondt method of party-list proportional representation.Contents1 Boundaries 2 History 3 Returned members 4 Election results4.1 2014 4.2 2009 4.3 2004 4.4 19995 See also 6 References 7 External linksBoundaries[edit] The constituency's boundaries are the same as those of Scotland, one of the four constituent parts of the United Kingdom. History[edit] The constituency was formed as a result of the European Parliamentary Elections Act 1999, replacing a number of single-member constituencies
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List Of Members Of The European Parliament For The United Kingdom, 2014–19
Legislation1972 EC Act 1986 EC (Amendment) Act 1993 EC (Amendment) Act 1998 EC (Amendment) Act 2002 EC (Amendment) Act 2008 EU (Amendment) Act 2011 EU ActEuropean Parliament Elections1979 1984 1989 1994 1999 2004 2009 20141973 delegation 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8thWithdrawal2004–05 EU Bill 2013–14 EU (Referendum) Bill 2015–16 EU membership renegotiation 2015 EU Referendum Act 2016 EU (Referendum) Act (Gibraltar)2016 EU membership referendumCauses Endorsements Issues Opinion pollingCampaignsOrganisations advocating and campaigning for a referendumPeople's Pledge Labour for a ReferendumLeave Vote Leave
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United Kingdom General Election, 1906
Henry Campbell-Bannerman LiberalAppointed Prime Minister Henry Campbell-Bannerman LiberalThe 1906 United Kingdom
United Kingdom
general election was held from 12 January to 8 February 1906. The Liberals, led by Prime Minister Henry Campbell-Bannerman, won a landslide majority at the election. The Conservatives led by Arthur Balfour, who had been in government until the month before the election, lost more than half their seats, including party leader Balfour's own seat in Manchester East, leaving them with their lowest ever number of seats
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Postcodes In The United Kingdom
Postal codes used in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
are known as postcodes (originally postal codes).[1] They are alphanumeric and were adopted nationally between 11 October 1959 and 1974, having been devised by the GPO (Royal Mail).[2] A full postcode is known as a "postcode unit" and designates an area with a number of addresses or a single major delivery point.[1] Postcodes
Postcodes
have been adopted for a wide range of purposes in addition to aiding the sorting of the mail: for calculating insurance premiums, designating destinations in route planning software and as the lowest level of aggregation in census enumeration
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Post Town
A post town is a required part of all postal addresses in the United Kingdom, and a basic unit of the postal delivery system.[1] Including the correct post town in the address increases the chance of a letter or parcel being delivered on time. Post towns in general originated as the location of delivery offices
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