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ARMS Charity Concerts
The ARMS Charity Concerts were a series of charitable rock concerts in support of Action into Research for Multiple Sclerosis in 1983.[1] The first (and initially planned to be the only) event took place at the Royal Albert Hall
Royal Albert Hall
on September 20, 1983, with subsequent dates occurring in the United States, with slightly different lineups of musicians.Contents1 Royal Albert Hall
Royal Albert Hall
ARMS Concert 2 U.S. ARMS Concerts 3 Recordings 4 References 5 Further reading Royal Albert Hall
Royal Albert Hall
ARMS Concert[edit] The idea for hosting the concert was envisaged by Ronnie Lane, ex-bassist for Small Faces
Small Faces
and Faces, himself a casualty of multiple sclerosis
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Benefit Concert
A benefit concert or charity concert is a type of musical benefit performance (e.g., concert, show, or gala) featuring musicians, comedians, or other performers that is held for a charitable purpose, often directed at a specific and immediate humanitarian crisis. Benefit concerts can have both subjective and concrete objectives. Subjective objectives include raising awareness about an issue such as misery in Africa (such as Live 8) and uplifting a nation after a disaster (such as America: A Tribute to Heroes). Concrete objectives include raising funds (such as Live Aid) and influencing legislation (such as Live 8
Live 8
or Farm Aid)
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Michael Winner
Robert Michael Winner
Michael Winner
(30 October 1935 – 21 January 2013) was an English film director and producer, and a restaurant critic for The Sunday Times.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 British films 2.2 American films3 Other media activity 4 Personal life4.1 Police Memorial Trust 4.2 Winner's Dinners 4.3 Political views 4.4 Interests and hobbies5 Death 6 Post-death controversies 7 Filmography 8 Bibliography 9 References 10 External linksEarly life[edit] Winner was an only child,[3] born in Hampstead,[4] London, England, to Helen (née Zlota)[4] and George Joseph Winner (1910–1975), a company director.[5][6] His family was Jewish;[7] his mother was Polish and his father of Russian extraction.[8] Following his father's death, Winner's mother gambled recklessly and sold art and furniture worth around £10m at the time, bequeathed to her not only for her life but to Michael thereafter
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Instrumental
An instrumental is a musical composition or recording without lyrics, or singing, although it might include some inarticulate vocals, such as shouted backup vocals in a Big Band
Big Band
setting. The music is primarily or exclusively produced by musical instruments. An instrumental can exist in music notation, after it is written by a composer; in the mind of the composer (especially in cases where the composer himself will perform the piece, as in the case of a blues solo guitarist or a folk music fiddle player); as a piece that is performed live by a single instrumentalist or a musical ensemble, which could range in size from a duo or trio to a large Big Band, concert band or orchestra. In a song that is otherwise sung, a section that is not sung but which is played by instruments can be called an instrumental interlude, or, if it occurs at the beginning of the song, before the singer starts to sing, an instrumental introduction
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Tulsa Time
"Tulsa Time" is a song written by Danny Flowers and recorded by American country music artist Don Williams. It was released in October 1978 as the first single from the album Expressions. It was Williams' eighth number one on the country chart, spending a single week at number one and eleven weeks in the top 40.[1] It was also recorded by Eric Clapton for his 1978 album Backless and a live version by Clapton from his album Just One Night became a #30 Billboard hit in 1980.Contents1 Chart performance - Don Williams single 2 Other versions 3 References 4 External linksChart performance - Don Williams single[edit]Chart (1978–1979) Peak positionUS Hot Country Songs (Billboard)[2] 1US Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles (Billboard)[3] 106Canadian RPM Country Tracks 1Other versions[edit]A live version from 1978 appears on Eric Clapton's Crossroads 2: Live in the Seventies, a boxed set released in 1996
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Layla
"Layla" is a song written by Eric Clapton
Eric Clapton
and Jim Gordon, originally released by their blues rock band Derek and the Dominos, as the thirteenth track from their album Layla
Layla
and Other Assorted Love Songs (November 1970). Its famously contrasting movements were composed separately by Clapton and Gordon. The song was inspired by a love story that originated in 7th-century Arabia
Arabia
and later formed the basis of The Story of Layla and Majnun
Layla and Majnun
by the 12th-century Persian poet Nizami Ganjavi,[1] a copy of which Ian Dallas had given to Clapton
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Goodnight, Irene
"Goodnight, Irene" or "Irene, Goodnight," is a 20th-century American folk standard, written in 3/4 time, first recorded by American blues musician Huddie 'Lead Belly' Ledbetter in 1933. The lyrics tell of the singer's troubled past with his love, Irene, and express his sadness and frustration. Several verses refer explicitly to suicidal fantasies, most famously in the line "sometimes I take a great notion to jump in the river and drown," which was the inspiration for the 1964 Ken Kesey
Ken Kesey
novel Sometimes a Great Notion and a song of the same name from John Mellencamp's 1989 album, Big Daddy, itself strongly informed by traditional American folk music.[1]Contents1 Lead Belly 2 Covers2.1 Other hit versions3 Use in Football 4 Other uses 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksLead Belly[edit] The specific origins of "Irene" are unclear
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Chris Stainton
Christopher Robert "Chris" Stainton (born 22 March 1944, Woodseats, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England) is an English session musician, keyboard player, bassist and songwriter, who first gained recognition with Joe Cocker in the late 1960s. In addition to his collaboration with Cocker, Stainton is best known for his work with Eric Clapton, The Who, Andy Fairweather Low and Bryan Ferry.Contents1 Career 2 Personal life 3 Discography 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksCareer[edit] After passing his eleven-plus examination, Stainton attended Rowlinson Technical School, Norton, Sheffield. Stainton's musical career began in 1960, when he played bass guitar with a local Sheffield band, 'Johnny Tempest and the Mariners'
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Ray Cooper
Raymond Thomas "Ray" Cooper (born 19 September 1947[1][2][3][4]) is an English virtuoso percussionist. He is a session and road-tour percussionist, and occasional actor, who has worked with several musically diverse bands and artists including George Harrison, Billy Joel, Rick Wakeman, Eric Clapton, Pink Floyd
Pink Floyd
and Elton John. Cooper absorbed the influence of rock drummers from the 1960s and 1970s such as Ginger Baker, Carmine Appice, and John Bonham. Incorporation of unusual instruments (for rock drummers of the time) such as cowbells, glockenspiel, and tubular bells, along with several standard kit elements, helped create a highly varied setup. Continually modified to this day, Cooper's percussion set offers an enormous array of percussion instruments for sonic diversity such as the tambourine, congas, crash cymbals, cowbells, roto toms, tubular bells, the gong, snare and timpani
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Fernando Saunders
Fernando Saunders is an American musician, singer and record producer from Detroit, Michigan
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Jazz-Fusion
Jazz
Jazz
fusion (also known as fusion)[1] is a musical genre that developed in the late 1960s when musicians combined aspects of jazz harmony and improvisation with styles such as funk, rock, rhythm and blues, and Latin jazz. During this time many jazz musicians began experimenting with electric instruments and amplified sound for the first time, as well as electronic effects and synthesizers. Many of the developments during the late 1960s and early 1970s have since become established elements of jazz fusion musical practice. Fusion arrangements vary in complexity—some employ groove-based vamps fixed to a single key, or even a single chord, with a simple melodic motif (a lick). Others can feature odd or shifting time signatures with elaborate chord progressions, melodies, and counter-melodies. Typically, these arrangements, whether simple or complex, will feature extended improvised sections that can vary in length
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Death Wish II (album)
Death Wish II is a soundtrack album by Jimmy Page, released by Swan Song Records on 15 February 1982, to accompany the film Death Wish II.Contents1 Overview 2 Track listing 3 Chart positions3.1 Album4 Personnel 5 Additional notes 6 ReferencesOverview[edit] Following the XYZ project, Page was asked by his London neighbour, movie director Michael Winner, to record a soundtrack for the film Death Wish II in late August 1981. Page was given a deadline of a few weeks to write and record the album at his personal studio The Sol and to travel on location to Los Angeles with Winner for songwriting themes. Winner later explained:I'd lived next door to Jimmy for many years. It was a very bad time for him – the drummer (John Bonham of Led Zeppelin) had died, and he was in a very inactive period
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Backless
Backless is a 1978 album by Eric Clapton. Produced by Glyn Johns, and released by Polydor Records, Backless reached No. 8 on the pop charts. While the single "Promises" only reached No. 37 in the UK, it was a much bigger success in the US, reaching No
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Royal Albert Hall
The Royal Albert Hall
Royal Albert Hall
is a concert hall on the northern edge of South Kensington, London, which has held the Proms concerts annually each summer since 1941. It has a capacity of up to 5,272 seats. The Hall is a registered charity held in trust for the nation and receives no public or government funding.[1] Since its opening by Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
in 1871, the world's leading artists from many performance genres have appeared on its stage and it has become one of the UK's most treasured and distinctive buildings. The location of some of the most notable events in British culture, each year it hosts more than 390 shows in the main auditorium, including classical, rock and pop concerts, ballet, opera, film screenings with live orchestra, sports, award ceremonies, school and community events, charity performances and banquets
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Guitar Solo
A guitar solo is a melodic passage, instrumental section, or entire piece of music written for a classical guitar, electric guitar or an acoustic guitar. In 20th and 21st century traditional music and popular music such as blues, swing, jazz, jazz fusion, rock and metal guitar solos often contain virtuoso techniques and varying degrees of improvisation. Guitar solos on classical guitar, which are typically written in musical notation, are also used in classical music forms such as chamber music and concertos. Guitar solos range from unaccompanied works for a single guitar to compositions with accompaniment from a few other instruments or a large ensemble. The accompaniment musicians for a guitar solo can range from a small ensemble such as a jazz quartet or a rock band, to a large ensemble such as an orchestra or big band
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Goodnight Irene
"Goodnight, Irene" or "Irene, Goodnight," is a 20th-century American folk standard, written in 3/4 time, first recorded by American blues musician Huddie 'Lead Belly' Ledbetter in 1933. The lyrics tell of the singer's troubled past with his love, Irene, and express his sadness and frustration. Several verses refer explicitly to suicidal fantasies, most famously in the line "sometimes I take a great notion to jump in the river and drown," which was the inspiration for the 1964 Ken Kesey
Ken Kesey
novel Sometimes a Great Notion and a song of the same name from John Mellencamp's 1989 album, Big Daddy, itself strongly informed by traditional American folk music.[1]Contents1 Lead Belly 2 Covers2.1 Other hit versions3 Use in Football 4 Other uses 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksLead Belly[edit] The specific origins of "Irene" are unclear
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