HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

APEV Pouchel Light
The APEV
APEV
Pouchel Light (English: Ladder Flea Light) is a French amateur-built aircraft, designed by Daniel Dalby and produced by APEV of Peynier. The aircraft is supplied as plans or as a kit for amateur construction.[2][3]Contents1 Design and development 2 Specifications (Pouchel Light) 3 References 4 External linksDesign and development[edit] The Pouchel Light replaced the Pouchel II in production, which in turn replaced the original APEV
APEV
Pouchel. The original Pouchel was constructed using three commercially available aluminium ladders, hence APEV
APEV
is the Association pour la Promotion des Echelles Volantes, or in English, Association for the Promotion of Flying Ladders
[...More...]

"APEV Pouchel Light" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Amateur-built Aircraft
Homebuilt aircraft, also known as amateur-built aircraft or kit planes, are constructed by persons for whom this is not a professional activity. These aircraft may be constructed from "scratch," from plans, or from assembly kits.[1][2]Contents1 Overview 2 History2.1 Early years 2.2 Technology and innovation 2.3 Future trends3 Building materials3.1 Wood and fabric 3.2 Wood/composite mixture 3.3 Metal 3.4 Composite4 Safety 5 Culture 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksOverview[edit] In the United States, Brazil, Australia, New Zealand
New Zealand
and South Africa, homebuilt aircraft may be licensed Experimental under FAA or similar local regulations. With some limitations, the builder(s) of the aircraft must have done it for their own education and recreation[3] rather than for profit
[...More...]

"Amateur-built Aircraft" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

NACA Airfoil
The NACA airfoils are airfoil shapes for aircraft wings developed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
(NACA). The shape of the NACA airfoils is described using a series of digits following the word "NACA"
[...More...]

"NACA Airfoil" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
[...More...]

"France" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Plywood
Plywood
Plywood
is a sheet material manufactured from thin layers or "plies" of wood veneer that are glued together with adjacent layers having their wood grain rotated up to 90 degrees to one another. It is an engineered wood from the family of manufactured boards which includes medium-density fibreboard (MDF) and particle board (chipboard). All plywoods bind resin and wood fibre sheets (cellulose cells are long, strong and thin) to form a composite material. This alternation of the grain is called cross-graining and has several important benefits: it reduces the tendency of wood to split when nailed in at the edges; it reduces expansion and shrinkage, providing improved dimensional stability; and it makes the strength of the panel consistent across all directions. There is usually an odd number of plies, so that the sheet is balanced—this reduces warping
[...More...]

"Plywood" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fibreglass
Fiberglass
Fiberglass
(US) or fibreglass (UK) is a common type of fiber-reinforced plastic using glass fiber. The fibers may be randomly arranged, flattened into a sheet (called a chopped strand mat), or woven into a fabric. The plastic matrix may be a thermoset polymer matrix – most often based on thermosetting polymers such as epoxy, polyester resin, or vinylester – or a thermoplastic. Cheaper and more flexible than carbon fiber, it is stronger than many metals by weight, and can be molded into complex shapes. Applications include aircraft, boats, automobiles, bath tubs and enclosures, swimming pools, hot tubs, septic tanks, water tanks, roofing, pipes, cladding, casts, surfboards, and external door skins. Other common names for fiberglass are glass-reinforced plastic (GRP),[1] glass-fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP)[2] or GFK (from German: Glasfaserverstärkter Kunststoff)
[...More...]

"Fibreglass" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Leading Edge
The leading edge is the part of the wing that first contacts the air;[1] alternatively it is the foremost edge of an airfoil section.[2] The first is an aerodynamic definition, the second a structural one. As an example of the distinction, during a tailslide, from an aerodynamic point of view, the trailing edge becomes the leading edge and vice versa but from a structural point of view the leading edge remains unchanged. Overview[edit] The structural leading edge may be equipped with one or more of the following: Leading edge
Leading edge
boots Leading edge
Leading edge
cuffs Leading edge
Leading edge
extensions Leading edge
Leading edge
slats Leading edge
Leading edge
slots Krueger flaps Stall strips Vortex generators.Associated terms are leading edge radius and leading edge stagnation point.[2] Seen in plan the leading edge may be straight or curved
[...More...]

"Leading Edge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Trailing Edge
The trailing edge of an aerodynamic surface such as a wing is its rear edge, where the airflow separated by the leading edge rejoins.[1] Essential flight control surfaces are attached here to redirect the air flow and exert a controlling force by changing its momentum. Such control surfaces include ailerons on the wings for roll control, elevators on the tailplane controlling pitch and the rudder on the fin controlling yaw. Elevators and ailerons may be combined as elevons on tailless aircraft. Other surfaces and equipment that may be attached to the trailing edge of an aircraft's wing or on its control surfaces include:on control surfaces:trim tabs servo tabs anti-servo tabsother surfaces:flapsother equipmentanti-shock bodies static dischargersReferences[edit]^ Crane, Dale: Dictionary of Aeronautical Terms, third edition, page 521. Aviation Supplies & Academics, 1997
[...More...]

"Trailing Edge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Dacron
Polyethylene
Polyethylene
terephthalate (sometimes written poly(ethylene terephthalate)), commonly abbreviated PET, PETE, or the obsolete PETP or PET-P, is the most common thermoplastic polymer resin of the polyester family and is used in fibres for clothing, containers for liquids and foods, thermoforming for manufacturing, and in combination with glass fibre for engineering resins. It may also be referred to by the brand name Dacron; in Britain, Terylene;[4] or, in Russia and the former Soviet Union, Lavsan. The majority of the world's PET production is for synthetic fibres (in excess of 60%), with bottle production accounting for about 30% of global demand.[5] In the context of textile applications, PET is referred to by its common name, polyester, whereas the acronym PET is generally used in relation to packaging
[...More...]

"Dacron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Airfoil
An airfoil (American English) or aerofoil (British English) is the shape of a wing, blade (of a propeller, rotor, or turbine), or sail (as seen in cross-section). An airfoil-shaped body moved through a fluid produces an aerodynamic force. The component of this force perpendicular to the direction of motion is called lift. The component parallel to the direction of motion is called drag. Subsonic flight
Subsonic flight
airfoils have a characteristic shape with a rounded leading edge, followed by a sharp trailing edge, often with a symmetric curvature of upper and lower surfaces. Foils of similar function designed with water as the working fluid are called hydrofoils. The lift on an airfoil is primarily the result of its angle of attack and shape
[...More...]

"Airfoil" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Spar (aviation)
In a fixed-wing aircraft, the spar is often the main structural member of the wing, running spanwise at right angles (or thereabouts depending on wing sweep) to the fuselage. The spar carries flight loads and the weight of the wings while on the ground. Other structural and forming members such as ribs may be attached to the spar or spars, with stressed skin construction also sharing the loads where it is used. There may be more than one spar in a wing or none at all
[...More...]

"Spar (aviation)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Two-stroke
A two-stroke (or two-cycle) engine is a type of internal combustion engine which completes a power cycle with two strokes (up and down movements) of the piston during only one crankshaft revolution. This is in contrast to a "four-stroke engine", which requires four strokes of the piston to complete a power cycle during two crankshaft revolutions. In a two-stroke engine, the end of the combustion stroke and the beginning of the compression stroke happen simultaneously, with the intake and exhaust (or scavenging) functions occurring at the same time. Two-stroke engines often have a high power-to-weight ratio, power being available in a narrow range of rotational speeds called the "power band"
[...More...]

"Two-stroke" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Two Stroke
A two-stroke (or two-cycle) engine is a type of internal combustion engine which completes a power cycle with two strokes (up and down movements) of the piston during only one crankshaft revolution. This is in contrast to a "four-stroke engine", which requires four strokes of the piston to complete a power cycle during two crankshaft revolutions. In a two-stroke engine, the end of the combustion stroke and the beginning of the compression stroke happen simultaneously, with the intake and exhaust (or scavenging) functions occurring at the same time. Two-stroke engines often have a high power-to-weight ratio, power being available in a narrow range of rotational speeds called the "power band"
[...More...]

"Two Stroke" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Aircraft Engine
An aircraft engine is the component of the propulsion system for an aircraft that generates mechanical power
[...More...]

"Aircraft Engine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
[...More...]

"International Standard Serial Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fixed Wing Aircraft
A fixed-wing aircraft is an aircraft, such as an airplane or aeroplane (See spelling differences), which is capable of flight using wings that generate lift caused by the vehicle's forward airspeed and the shape of the wings. Fixed-wing aircraft
Fixed-wing aircraft
are distinct from rotary-wing aircraft, in which the wings form a rotor mounted on a spinning shaft, and ornithopters, in which the wings flap in similar manner to a bird. Glider fixed-wing aircraft, including free-flying gliders of various kinds and tethered kites, can use moving air to gain height. Powered fixed-wing aircraft that gain forward thrust from an engine (aeroplanes) include powered paragliders, powered hang gliders and some ground effect vehicles. The wings of a fixed-wing aircraft are not necessarily rigid; kites, hang-gliders, variable-sweep wing aircraft and aeroplanes using wing-warping are all fixed-wing aircraft
[...More...]

"Fixed Wing Aircraft" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.