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AIF Header
In computer programming, the Arm Image Format (AIF) is an object file format used primarily for software intended to run on ARM microprocessors. It was introduced by Acorn Computers
Acorn Computers
for use with their Archimedes computer.[citation needed] It can optionally facilitate debugging, including under operating systems running on other processor architectures.Contents1 Format 2 AIF header 3 Debugging 4 Other uses 5 ReferencesFormat[edit] The file can be either executable or non-executable and is loaded at 0x8000 unless otherwise specified.[1] Executable
Executable
files can relocate themselves if necessary and non-executable files are prepared for execution by an image loader. An extended AIF is a type of non-executable which includes information to enable the placement of code and data within specific areas of memory.[1] The file includes a header and separate areas of read-only and read-write code/data
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Acorn Computers
Acorn Computers
Acorn Computers
Ltd. was a British computer company established in Cambridge, England, in 1978. The company produced a number of computers which were especially popular in the UK, including the Acorn Electron and the Acorn Archimedes. Acorn's BBC Micro
BBC Micro
computer dominated the UK educational computer market during the 1980s.[1] It is more known for its BBC Micro
BBC Micro
model B computer than for its other products. Though the company was broken up into several independent operations in 1998, its legacy includes the development of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) personal computers. One of its operating systems, RISC OS, continues to be developed by RISC OS
RISC OS
Open
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RiscPC
The RiscPC (stylised with a half-space[3][self-published source?] as Risc PC, also referred to as Risc PC and codenamed Medusa) was Acorn Computers's next generation RISC OS/Acorn RISC Machine computer, launched on 15 April 1994,[4] which superseded the Acorn Archimedes.[5] The Acorn PC card and software allows PC compatible software to be run. Like the Archimedes, the RiscPC continued the practice of having the RISC OS operating system in a ROM module. RiscPC augmented the ROM-based core OS with a disk-based directory structure containing configuration information, and some applications which had previously been kept in ROM
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DOS MZ Executable
The DOS
DOS
MZ executable format is the executable file format used for . EXE files in DOS. The file can be identified by the ASCII
ASCII
string "MZ" (hexadecimal: 4D 5A) at the beginning of the file (the "magic number"). "MZ" are the initials of Mark Zbikowski, one of the developers of MS-DOS.[1] The MZ DOS
DOS
executable file is newer than the COM executable format and differs from it. The DOS
DOS
executable header contains relocation information, which allows multiple segments to be loaded at arbitrary memory addresses, and it supports executables larger than 64k; however, the format still requires relatively low memory limits
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New Executable
The New Executable
Executable
(abbreviated NE or NewEXE) is a 16-bit .exe file format, a successor to the DOS MZ executable format. It was used in Windows
Windows
1.0–3.x, multitasking MS-DOS 4.0,[1] OS/2
OS/2
1.x, and the OS/2 subset of Windows
Windows
NT up to version 5.0 ( Windows
Windows
2000)
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Relocatable Object Module Format
The Relocatable Object Module Format (OMF) is an object file format used primarily for software intended to run on Intel 80x86 microprocessors. It was originally developed by Intel[when?] under the name Object Module Format, and is perhaps best known to DOS
DOS
users as an .OBJ file. It has since been standardized by the Tool Interface Standards Committee.Contents1 File format 2 Use 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksFile format[edit] Many object file formats consist of a set of tables, such as the relocation table, which are either stored on fixed positions in the file, like the a.out format, or are pointed to by the header, like the ELF format
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Portable Executable
The Portable Executable
Executable
(PE) format is a file format for executables, object code, DLLs, FON Font files, and others used in 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Windows operating systems. The PE format is a data structure that encapsulates the information necessary for the Windows OS loader to manage the wrapped executable code. This includes dynamic library references for linking, API export and import tables, resource management data and thread-local storage (TLS) data. On NT operating systems, the PE format is used for EXE, DLL, SYS (device driver), and other file types. The Extensible Firmware Interface
Extensible Firmware Interface
(EFI) specification states that PE is the standard executable format in EFI environments.[1] On Windows NT
Windows NT
operating systems, PE currently supports the IA-32, IA-64, x86-64 (AMD64/Intel 64), ARM and ARM64 instruction set architectures (ISAs)
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Preferred Executable Format
The Preferred Executable
Executable
Format is a file format that specifies the format of executable files and other object code. PEF executables are also called Code Fragment Manager files (CFM). PEF was developed by Apple Computer
Apple Computer
for use in its classic Mac OS operating system. It was optimised for RISC processors. In macOS, the Mach-O
Mach-O
file format is the native executable format
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XCOFF
XCOFF, for "eXtended COFF", is an improved and expanded version of the COFF object file format defined by IBM
IBM
and used in AIX. Early versions of the PowerPC
PowerPC
Macintosh also supported XCOFF, as did BeOS. X COFF additions include the use of csects to provide subsection granularity of cross-references, and the use of stabs for debugging. Information for the handling of shared libraries is also more elaborate than for plain COFF. More recently, IBM
IBM
defined an XCOFF64 version supporting 64-bit AIX, and used XCOFF32 to mean the original file format. See also[edit]Comparison of executable file formatsExternal links[edit]IBM's description of XCOFFv t e Executable
Executable
and object file formatsa.out AIF COFF CMD COM ECOFF ELF GOFF Hunk Mach-O MZ NE OMF OS/360 PE PEF XCOFFComparison of formats .exeThis Unix-related article is a stub
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.EXE
.exe is a common filename extension denoting an executable file (the main execution point of a computer program) for DOS, OpenVMS, Microsoft
Microsoft
Windows, Symbian
Symbian
or OS/2. Besides the executable program, many .exe files contain other components called resources, such as bitmap graphics and icons which the executable program may use for its graphical user interface.Contents1 File
File
formats1.1 DOS 1.2 OS/2 1.3 Windows2 Other 3 See also 4 References 5 External links File
File
formats[edit] There are several file formats which may be used by a file with a .exe extension: DOS[edit] Main article: DOS
DOS
MZ executable16-bit DOS
DOS
MZ executable The original DOS
DOS
executable file format
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Castle Technology
Castle Technology
Castle Technology
Limited, named after Framlingham Castle,[1] is a British computer company based in Cambridge, England.[2] It began as a producer of ARM computers and manufactured the Acorn-branded range of desktop computers that run RISC OS.[3] Following the break-up of Acorn in 1998, Castle Technology
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Iyonix PC
The Iyonix PC was an Acorn-clone personal computer sold by Castle Technology and Iyonix Ltd between 2002 and 2008. According to news site Slashdot, it was the first personal computer to use Intel's XScale processor.[5] It ran RISC OS 5.[6]Contents1 History 2 Features 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit]Rear view, showing connectorsThe Iyonix originated as a secret project by Pace engineers in connection with development of set-top boxes (STBs),[citation needed] and has been noted as a successor to the Risc PC.[7] Pace had a licence to develop RISCOS Ltd's OS sources for use in the STB market. The Iyonix was developed under the code name Tungsten and uses RISC OS 5, which is a version of RISC OS that supports ARM CPUs with 32-bit addressing modes. The sources and hardware design were subsequently acquired by Castle, who developed them into the final product.[8] Castle continued to keep the project a secret, requiring developers to sign a non-disclosure agreement
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Amiga Hunk
Hunk is the executable file format of tools and programs of the Amiga Operating System based on Motorola
Motorola
68000
68000
CPU
CPU
and other processors of the same family
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A9home
The A9home
A9home
was a niche[1] small-form-factor desktop computer running RISC OS
RISC OS
Adjust32. It was officially unveiled at the 2005 Wakefield Show,[2][3][4] and is the second commercial ARM-based RISC OS
RISC OS
computer to run a 32-bit
32-bit
version of RISC OS
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Aemulor
In computing, Aemulor is a emulator of the earlier 26-bit addressing-mode ARM microprocessors which runs on ARM processors under 32-bit addressing-mode versions of RISC OS. It was written by Adrian Lees and released in 2003. An enhanced version is available under the name Aemulor Pro. The software allows Raspberry Pi,[2] Iyonix PC and A9home computers running RISC OS to make use of some software written for older hardware. As of 2012[update], compatibility with the BeagleBoard single-board computer was under development.Contents1 Development 2 Features2.1 Compatible software3 ReferencesDevelopment[edit] The software's existence was first reported around the time of the announcement of the Iyonix in October 2002.[3][4] A demo version was released in February 2003,[5][6] with the commercial release in March of that year.[7][8][9] Aemulor Pro was released in 2004
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