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AIDS Denial
HIV/AIDS
HIV/AIDS
denialism is the belief, contradicted by conclusive medical and scientific evidence,[1][2] that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) does not cause acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).[3] Some of its proponents reject the existence of HIV, while others accept that HIV
HIV
exists but argue that it is a harmless passenger virus and not the cause of AIDS
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Transmission Electron Microscopy
Transmission electron microscopy
Transmission electron microscopy
(TEM, also sometimes conventional transmission electron microscopy or CTEM) is a microscopy technique in which a beam of electrons is transmitted through a specimen to form an image. The specimen is most often an ultrathin section less than 100 nm thick or a suspension on a grid. An image is formed from the interaction of the electrons with the sample as the beam is transmitted through the specimen. The image is then magnified and focused onto an imaging device, such as a fluorescent screen, a layer of photographic film, or a sensor such as a charge-coupled device. Transmission electron microscopes are capable of imaging at a significantly higher resolution than light microscopes, owing to the smaller de Broglie wavelength of electrons
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Nature (journal)
Nature is a British multidisciplinary scientific journal, first published on 4 November 1869.[1] It was ranked the world's most cited scientific journal by the Science Edition of the 2010 Journal
Journal
Citation Reports and is ascribed an impact factor of 40.137 , making it one of the world's top academic journals.[2][3] It is one of the few remaining academic journals that publishes original research across a wide range of scientific fields.[3][4] Research
Research
scientists are the primary audience for the journal, but summaries and accompanying articles are intended to make many of the most important papers understandable to scientists in other fields and the educated public. Towards the front of each issue are editorials, news and feature articles on issues of general interest to scientists, including current affairs, science funding, business, scientific ethics and research breakthroughs. There are also sections on books and arts
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Journal Of Psychohistory
The Journal of Psychohistory
Psychohistory
(J Psychohist) is a journal in the field of psychohistory, edited by Lloyd deMause
Lloyd deMause
and published by the Institute for Psychohistory. It aims to provide "a new psychological view of world events — past and present". The journal is published quarterly and contains subjects such as childhood and the family (especially child abuse), psychobiography with extensive childhood material, political psychology and psychological studies of anthropology. References[edit]^ a b "The Journal of psychohistory". ResearchGate
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Cancer Research (journal)
Cancer
Cancer
Research is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the American Association for Cancer
Cancer
Research. It covers research on all aspects of cancer and cancer-related biomedical sciences and was established in 1941. The editor-in-chief is George C. Prendergast (Lankenau Institute for Medical Research)
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Public Health
Public health
Public health
is "the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting human health through organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals."[1] Analyzing the health of a population and the threats is the basis for public health.[2] The "public" in question can be as small as a handful of people, an entire village or it can be as large as several continents, in the case of a pandemic. "Health" takes into account physical, mental and social well-being. It is not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, according to the World Health
Health
Organization.[3] Public health
Public health
is interdisciplinary. For example, epidemiology, biostatistics and health services are all relevant
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Zidovudine
Zidovudine
Zidovudine
(ZDV), also known as azidothymidine (AZT), is an antiretroviral medication used to prevent and treat HIV/AIDS.[2] It is generally recommended for use with other antiretrovirals.[2] It may be used to prevent mother-to-child spread during birth or after a needlestick injury or other potential exposure.[2] It is sold both by itself and together as lamivudine/zidovudine and abacavir/lamivudine/zidovudine.[2] It can be used by mouth or by slow injection into a vein.[2] Common side effects include headaches, fever, and nausea.[2] Serious side effects include liver problems, muscle damage, and hi
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Institute Of Medicine
Coordinates: 38°53′48″N 77°01′10″W / 38.8968°N 77.0194°W / 38.8968; -77.0194National Academy of MedicineFormation 1970; 48 years ago (1970) (as Institute of Medicine)Type NGOpresidentVictor DzauWebsite nam.eduThe National Academy of Medicine
National Academy of Medicine
(NAM), formerly called the Institute of Medicine (IoM), is an American nonprofit, non-governmental organization
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U.S. National Academy Of Sciences
The National Academy of Sciences
National Academy of Sciences
(NAS) is a United States
United States
nonprofit, non-governmental organization. NAS is part of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, along with the National Academy of Engineering
Engineering
(NAE) and the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). As a national academy, new members of the organization are elected annually by current members, based on their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. Election to the National Academies is one of the highest honors in the scientific field. Members serve pro bono as "advisers to the nation" on science, engineering, and medicine
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Perth, Western Australia
Perth
Perth
(/ˈpɜːrθ/ ( listen)) is the capital and largest city of the Australian state of Western Australia. It is the fourth-most populous city in Australia, with a population of 2,022,044 living in Greater Perth.[1] Perth
Perth
is part of the South West Land Division of Western Australia, with the majority of the metropolitan area located on the Swan Coastal Plain, a narrow strip between the Indian Ocean and the Darling Scarp. The first areas settled were on the Swan River at Guildford, with the city's central business district and port (Fremantle) both later founded downriver. Perth
Perth
was founded by Captain James Stirling in 1829 as the administrative centre of the Swan River Colony
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Proceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
National Academy of Sciences
of the United States of America (PNAS) is the official scientific journal of the National Academy of Sciences, published since 1915. With broad coverage, spanning the biological, physical, and social sciences, the journal publishes original research alongside scientific reviews, commentaries, and letters. In 1999–2009, the last period for which data are available, PNAS was the second most cited journal across all fields of science.[1] PNAS is published weekly in print, and daily online in PNAS Early Edition.Contents1 History 2 Editors 3 Peer review 4 Dual use papers and national security 5 Impact 6 PNAS Plus and significance statements 7 Sustainability science 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] PNAS was established by the National Academy of Sciences
National Academy of Sciences
(NAS) in 1914, with its first issue published in 1915
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Right Of Reply
The right of reply generally means the right to defend oneself against public criticism in the same venue where it was published
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Margaret Heckler
Margaret Mary Heckler (née O'Shaughnessy; born June 21, 1931) is a Republican politician from Massachusetts
Massachusetts
who served in the United States House of Representatives for eight terms, from 1967–83 and was later the Secretary of Health and Human Services
Secretary of Health and Human Services
and Ambassador to Ireland under President Ronald Reagan. After her defeat in 1982, no woman would be elected to Congress from Massachusetts
Massachusetts
until Niki Tsongas in a special election in 2007.Contents1 Early life 2 Congressional career2.1 Electoral history3 Health and Human Services Secretary3.1 Public divorce saga 3.2 Departure from Cabinet4 Ambassador to Ireland 5 See also 6 References 7 Links 8 Sources 9 External linksEarly life[edit] She was born Margaret Mary O'Shaughnessy in Flushing, New York
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Nature Biotechnology
Nature Biotechnology
Biotechnology
is a peer reviewed scientific journal published monthly by the Nature Publishing Group. The chief editor is Andrew Marshall who is part of an in-house team of editors. The focus of the journal is biotechnology including research results and the commercial business sector of this field. Coverage includes the related biological, biomedical, agricultural and environmental sciences
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Western Blot
The western blot (sometimes called the protein immunoblot) is a widely used analytical technique used in molecular biology, immunogenetics and other molecular biology disciplines to detect specific proteins in a sample of tissue homogenate or extract. Synthetic or animal-derived antibodies are created that react with a specific target protein. The sample material undergoes protein denaturation, followed by gel electrophoresis. Next, the electrophoresis membrane is washed in a solution containing the specific antibody
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Gold Standard (test)
In medicine and statistics, gold standard test is usually diagnostic test or benchmark that is the best available under reasonable conditions.[1] Other times, gold standard is the most accurate test possible without restrictions. Both meanings are different because for example, in medicine, dealing with conditions that would require an autopsy to have a perfect diagnosis, the gold standard test would be the best one that keeps the patient alive instead of the autopsy.Contents1 In medicine 2 Test calibration 3 Ambiguity 4 See also 5 ReferencesIn medicine[edit] " Gold
Gold
standard" can refer to the criteria by which scientific evidence is evaluated
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